United Nations Security Council Resolution 1975

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UN Security Council
Resolution 1975
059 French Foreign Legion.JPG
Rebels in Côte d'Ivoire with AMX 10 RC
Date30 March 2011
Meeting no.6,508
CodeS/RES/1975 (Document)
SubjectThe situation in Côte d'Ivoire
Voting summary
  • 15 voted for
  • None voted against
  • None abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1975, adopted unanimously on March 30, 2011, after recalling previous resolutions on the situation in Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), including resolutions 1572 (2004), 1893 (2009), 1911 (2010), 1924 (2010), 1933 (2010), 1942 (2010), 1946 (2010), 1951 (2010), 1962 (2010), 1967 (2011) and 1968 (2011), the Council demanded that Laurent Gbagbo step down as President (allowing internationally recognised President Alassane Ouattara to take power) and imposed sanctions on him and his close associates. [1]

Contents

The resolution was sponsored by France and Nigeria. [2]

Resolution

Observations

In the preamble of the resolution, the Council wished for a peaceful, durable and democratic resolution to the crisis in Côte d'Ivoire. It commended the efforts of the African Union and Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) to resolve the crisis, and reaffirmed the international recognition given to Alassane Ouattara as President of Côte d'Ivoire.

There was concern at the rapidly deteriorating situation in the country and its possible relapse into a civil war. The Council condemned all provocative actions and violations of human rights and international humanitarian law by any party and called for restraint and the peaceful resolution of their differences. All such violations had to be investigated and those responsible be brought to justice, with the Council considering that attacks on civilians could constitute a crime against humanity.

Acts

Acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Council urged all Ivorian parties to respect the will of the people and the election of Alassane Ouattara as President of Côte d'Ivoire, as recognised by ECOWAS, the African Union and the rest of the international community. It also demanded an immediate end to violence against civilians. Furthermore, the Ivorian parties were urged to pursue the political solution offered by the African Union, and Laurent Gbagbo was criticised for not accepting the solution and urged to step down. [3]

The resolution condemned attacks by defence forces, militias and mercenaries against United Nations peacekeepers, and urged Laurent Gbagbo's forces and supporters to fully co-operate with the United Nations Operation in Côte d'Ivoire (UNOCI). Furthermore, attacks against civilians were strongly condemned and the Council reiterated that UNOCI could use "all necessary measures" in its mandate to protect civilians under imminent threat of attack. [4]

All Ivorian parties were urged to co-operate with UNOCI and supporting French forces as part of Operation Unicorn, by guaranteeing their safety and freedom of movement of Côte d'Ivoire, as well as co-operating with an independent inquiry put in place by the United Nations Human Rights Council. Ivorian state media, including Radiodiffusion Television Ivoirienne, was condemned for inciting violence and restrictions on freedom of expression were urged to be lifted. [5]

There was concern at the increase in the number of refugees and internally displaced persons, particularly in Liberia, and demands that Laurent Gbagbo lift the siege against the hotel where Alassane Ouattara was blockaded and protected by UNOCI troops.

Sanctioned individuals

Finally, the Council placed financial and travel sanctions on the following individuals for obstructing the peace process: [5]

See also

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References

  1. "Security Council demands end to violence in Côte d'Ivoire, imposing sanctions against former President and urging him to 'step aside'". United Nations. March 30, 2011.
  2. ""Gbagbo must go" is call as UN Council OKs Cote d'Ivoire resolution". Xinhua. 31 March 2011.
  3. "UN Security Council imposes "targeted sanctions" against incumbent leader in Cote d'Ivoire". VOV News (Vietnam). 30 March 2011.
  4. "UN council slaps sanctions on Ivory Coast's Gbagbo". Reuters. 30 March 2011. Archived from the original on 8 September 2012.
  5. 1 2 "Demanding end to violence in Côte d'Ivoire, Security Council imposes targeted sanctions". Modern Ghana. 30 March 2011.