United Nations Security Council Resolution 773

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UN Security Council
Resolution 773
Kuwait-Iraq barrier.png
Date26 August 1992
Meeting no.3,108
CodeS/RES/773 (Document)
SubjectIraq–Kuwait
Voting summary
14 voted for
None voted against
1 abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 773, adopted on 26 August 1992, after recalling resolutions 687 (1991) and 689 (1991), the Council considered the work of the Iraq–Kuwait Boundary Demarcation Commission established on 2 May 1991, and reiterated its position that it would enforce any violation of the ceasefire in the demilitarised zone. [1]

United Nations Security Council Resolution 687 United Nations Security Council resolution

United Nations Security Council Resolution 687, adopted on 3 April 1991, after reaffirming resolutions 660, 661, 662, 664, 665, 666, 667, 669, 670, 674, 677, 678 and 686 (1991), the Council set the terms, in a comprehensive resolution, with which Iraq was to comply after losing the Gulf War. Resolution 687 was passed by 12 votes to one against (Cuba) with two abstentions from Ecuador and Yemen after a very extended meeting. Iraq accepted the provisions of the resolution on 6 April 1991.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 689 United Nations Security Council resolution

United Nations Security Council resolution 689, adopted unanimously on 9 April 1991, after recalling Resolution 687 (1991), the Council noted a report by the Secretary-General and decided to establish the United Nations Iraq–Kuwait Observation Mission to monitor the demilitarized zone between Iraq and Kuwait, known as the Kuwait–Iraq barrier.

Demilitarized zone Area in which agreements between military powers forbid military activities

A demilitarized zone, DMZ or DZ is an area in which treaties or agreements between nations, military powers or contending groups forbid military installations, activities or personnel. A DMZ often lies along an established frontier or boundary between two or more military powers or alliances. A DMZ may sometimes form a de facto international border, such as the 38th parallel between North and South Korea. Other examples of demilitarized zones are a 120-mile (190 km) wide area between Iraq and Kuwait, Antarctica and outer space.

Contents

The Council stressed that the Commission was not to reallocate territory on the border, but for the first time is demarcating the boundary set out in the "Agreed Minutes between the State of Kuwait and the Republic of Iraq regarding the restoration of Friendly Relations, Recognition and Related Matters" signed on 4 October 1963 by Iraq and Kuwait. [2] It also welcomed the decision of the Commission to consider the Eastern section of the boundary at its next session and urged for it to be demarcated as soon as possible. The Commission completed its work in November 1992. [3]

A political demarcation line is a territorial delimitation, often agreed upon as part of an armistice or ceasefire.

Iraq Republic in Western Asia

Iraq, officially the Republic of Iraq, is a country in Western Asia, bordered by Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest and Syria to the west. The capital, and largest city, is Baghdad. Iraq is home to diverse ethnic groups including Arabs, Kurds, Chaldeans, Assyrians, Turkmen, Shabakis, Yazidis, Armenians, Mandeans, Circassians and Kawliya. Around 99% of the country's 37 million citizens are Muslims, with tiny minorities of Christians, Yarsans, Yezidis and Mandeans also present. The official languages of Iraq are Arabic and Kurdish.

Kuwait Country in Western Asia

Kuwait, officially the State of Kuwait, is a country in Western Asia. Situated in the northern edge of Eastern Arabia at the tip of the Persian Gulf, it shares borders with Iraq and Saudi Arabia. As of 2016, Kuwait has a population of 4.5 million people: 1.3 million are Kuwaitis and 3.2 million are expatriates. Expatriates account for 70% of the population.

The resolution was adopted by 14 votes to none, while Ecuador abstained. [4]

Ecuador Republic in South America

Ecuador, officially the Republic of Ecuador, is a country in northwestern South America, bordered by Colombia on the north, Peru on the east and south, and the Pacific Ocean on the west. Ecuador also includes the Galápagos Islands in the Pacific, about 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) west of the mainland. The capital city is Quito, which is also its largest city.

See also

Gulf War 1990–1991 war between Iraq and Coalition Forces

The Gulf War, codenamed Operation Desert Shield for operations leading to the buildup of troops and defense of Saudi Arabia and Operation Desert Storm in its combat phase, was a war waged by coalition forces from 35 nations led by the United States against Iraq in response to Iraq's invasion and annexation of Kuwait arising from oil pricing and production disputes. The war is also known under other names, such as the Persian Gulf War, First Gulf War, Gulf War I, Kuwait War, First Iraq War or Iraq War, before the term "Iraq War" became identified instead with the post-2003 Iraq War. The war has also earned the nickname Video Game War after the daily broadcast of images from cameras on board US bombers during Operation Desert Storm.

Invasion of Kuwait Major conflict between Iraq and Kuwait

The invasion of Kuwait on 2 August 1990 was a two-day operation conducted by Iraq against the neighboring State of Kuwait, which resulted in the seven-month-long Iraqi occupation of the country. This invasion and Iraq's subsequent refusal to withdraw from Kuwait by a deadline mandated by the United Nations led to military intervention by a United Nations-authorized coalition of forces led by the United States. These events came to be known as the first Gulf War and resulted in the expulsion of Iraqi forces from Kuwait and the Iraqis setting 600 Kuwaiti oil wells on fire during their retreat.

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References

  1. Conte, Alex (2005). Security in the 21st century: the United Nations, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. p. 126. ISBN   978-0-7546-2442-4.
  2. Klabbers, Jan (1994). "No More Shifting Lines? The Report of the Iraq–Kuwait Boundary Demarcation Commission". International and Comparative Law Quarterly. Cambridge University Press. 43 (4): 904–913. doi:10.1093/iclqaj/43.4.904.
  3. Katzman, Kenneth; Prados, Alfred B.; Jeffries, Leon M.; McHugh, Lois; Metz, Helen Chapin; Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service (2003). Iraq: issues, historical background, bibliography. Nova Publishers. p. 42. ISBN   978-1-59033-292-4.
  4. "UN Security Council resolution 773 on Iraq–Kuwait boundary". United States Department of State. 28 September 1992.