United States Capitol Guide Service

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Patch of the United States Capitol Guides USCGSpatch.jpg
Patch of the United States Capitol Guides

The United States Capitol Guide Service was a guide service charged by the United States Congress to "provide guided tours of the interior of the United States Capitol Building for the education and enlightenment of the general public, without charge for such tours." It existed under 2 U.S.C.   § 2166.

Guide person who escorts travelers or tourists through unknown or unfamiliar locations

A guide is a person who leads travelers, sportsmen, or tourists through unknown or unfamiliar locations. The term can also be applied to a person who leads others to more abstract goals such as knowledge or wisdom.

United States Congress Legislature of the United States

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States, and consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate. The Congress meets in the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. Both senators and representatives are chosen through direct election, though vacancies in the Senate may be filled by a gubernatorial appointment. Congress has 535 voting members: 435 representatives and 100 senators. The House of Representatives has six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in addition to its 435 voting members. Although they cannot vote in the full house, these members can address the house, sit and vote in congressional committees, and introduce legislation.

United States Capitol seat of the United States Congress

The United States Capitol, often called the Capitol Building, is the home of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. It is located on Capitol Hill at the eastern end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Though no longer at the geographic center of the Federal District, the Capitol forms the origin point for the District's street-numbering system and the District's four quadrants.

Created in 1876 in honor of the United States turning 100 years old, the Capitol Guide Service was subject to the direction, supervision, and control of a Capitol Guide Board consisting of the Architect of the Capitol, the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate, and the Sergeant at Arms of the House of Representatives. These same three officials also made up the Capitol Police Board. Key Guide Service personnel included the Director, four Assistant Directors, as well as many regular guides.

Architect of the Capitol Federal agency that maintains the United States Capitol Complex

The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is the federal agency responsible for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, and also the head of that agency. The Architect of the Capitol is in the legislative branch and is accountable to the United States Congress and the Supreme Court.

The Capitol Police Board is a group of three members who maintain jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. The three members of this board are the acting Architect of the Capitol Christine A. Merdon, the Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate Michael C. Stenger, and the Sergeant at Arms of the United States House of Representatives Paul D. Irving. The Chief of the Capitol Police also serves as a member but in an ex officio status.

Personnel of the Capitol Guide Service could also be transferred to the United States Capitol Police force at the discretion of the Capitol Guide Board to provide ushering and informational services, and other services not directly involving law enforcement. This sometimes happened during major events, such as presidential inaugurations and Lying in State ceremonies.

United States Capitol Police United States federal law enforcement agency charged with protecting the U.S. Congress

The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a federal law enforcement agency in the United States charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its territories. It answers to Congress, not the President of the United States, and is the only full-service federal law enforcement agency responsible to the legislative branch of the Federal Government of the United States.

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South Visitor Facility

The Capitol Guides operated out of facilities located on the south side of the United States Capitol. Visitors were processed through the South Visitor Facility which included security screening and then directed into the Capitol, itself, via a walk around the west front of the building to enter through a west terrace door. Behind the South Visitor Facility was a trailer, which served as the temporary rest area and locker facility for the guides. Upon the opening of the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) on December 2, 2008, both buildings were removed and all guide-related operations as well as the guides themselves were transferred to the jurisdiction and oversight of the Architect of the Capitol, specifically the Visitor Services Division of the Capitol Visitor Center.

United States Capitol Visitor Center

The United States Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) is a large underground addition to the United States Capitol complex which serves as a gathering point for up to 4,000 tourists and an expansion space for the US Congress. It is located below the East Front of the Capitol and its plaza, between the Capitol building and 1st Street East. The complex contains 580,000 square feet (54,000 m2) of space below ground on three floors. The overall project's budget was $621 million.

Rate of tours

Tours began every ten minutes.

Uniform

The Capitol Guide Service had two uniforms, a full dress and summer uniform. The full dress uniform was notable for its striking red blazer with a circular patch on the left breast. It was accompanied by a white shirt, navy blue tie, and navy blue pants. It could be accompanied by a navy blue vest. It was required for ceremonies and other formal occasions, as well as cold weather. The less formal summer uniform was a red cotton short sleeve polo shirt with circular patch on the left breast. It was accompanied by navy blue pants. The summer uniform was generally not worn until temperatures were above 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Polo shirt form of shirt

A polo shirt is a form of shirt with a collar, a placket neckline with typically two or three buttons, and an optional pocket. Polo shirts are usually short sleeved; they were originally used by polo players during the 1920s

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Mess dress uniform formal evening dress worn by military officers in the mess or at other formal occasions

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Full dress uniform Uniform for wear on formal occasions

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Uniforms of the United States Navy

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Sergeant at Arms of the United States House of Representatives

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The Uniforms of the Canadian Armed Forces are the official dress worn by members of Canada's military while on duty.

Airman Battle Uniform

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Service dress uniform Wikipedia disambiguation page

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Uniforms and insignia of the Kriegsmarine

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