United States Secretary of the Navy

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Secretary of the Navy
United States Department of the Navy Seal.svg
Seal of the Department of the Navy
Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy.svg
Flag of the Secretary of the Navy
Richard V. Spencer (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Richard V. Spencer

since 3 August 2017
Department of the Navy
Style Mister Secretary
The Honorable
(formal address in writing)
Reports to Secretary of Defense
Deputy Secretary of Defense
AppointerThe President
with Senate advice and consent
Inaugural holder Benjamin Stoddert
Formation18 June 1798
Succession 3rd in SecDef succession
DeputyThe Under Secretary
(Principal Civilian Deputy)
Chief of Naval Operations
(Navy Advisor and Deputy)
The Commandant
(Marine Corps Advisor and Deputy)
Salary Executive Schedule, level II
Website Official Website

The Secretary of the Navy (or SECNAV) is a statutory officer (10 U.S.C.   § 5013) and the head (chief executive officer) of the Department of the Navy, a military department (component organization) within the Department of Defense of the United States of America.

Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. It provides the legal basis for the roles, missions and organization of each of the services as well as the United States Department of Defense. Each of the five subtitles deals with a separate aspect or component of the armed services.

Chief executive officer highest-ranking corporate officer or administrator

The chief executive officer (CEO) or just chief executive (CE), is the most senior corporate, executive, or administrative officer in charge of managing an organization – especially an independent legal entity such as a company or nonprofit institution. CEOs lead a range of organizations, including public and private corporations, non-profit organizations and even some government organizations. The CEO of a corporation or company typically reports to the board of directors and is charged with maximizing the value of the entity, which may include maximizing the share price, market share, revenues or another element. In the non-profit and government sector, CEOs typically aim at achieving outcomes related to the organization's mission, such as reducing poverty, increasing literacy, etc.

United States Department of the Navy

The United States Department of the Navy (DoN) was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide a government organizational structure to the United States Navy, the United States Marine Corps and, when directed by the President, the United States Coast Guard, as a service within the Department of the Navy, though each remain independent service branches. The Department of the Navy was an Executive Department and the Secretary of the Navy was a member of the President's cabinet until 1949, when amendments to the National Security Act of 1947 changed the name of the National Military Establishment to the Department of Defense and made it an Executive Department. The Department of the Navy then became, along with the Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force, a Military Department within the Department of Defense: subject to the authority, direction and control of the Secretary of Defense.

Contents

The Secretary of the Navy must be a civilian by law, at least 5 years removed from active military service. The Secretary is appointed by the President and requires confirmation by a majority vote of the Senate.

Civilian control of the military is a doctrine in military and political science that places ultimate responsibility for a country's strategic decision-making in the hands of the civilian political leadership, rather than professional military officers. The reverse situation, where professional military officers control national politics, is called a military dictatorship. A lack of control over the military may result in a state within a state. One author, paraphrasing Samuel P. Huntington's writings in The Soldier and the State, has summarized the civilian control ideal as "the proper subordination of a competent, professional military to the ends of policy as determined by civilian authority".

President of the United States Head of state and of government of the United States

The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C.

The Secretary of the Navy was, from its creation in 1798, a member of the President's Cabinet until 1949, when the Secretary of the Navy (and the Secretaries of the Army and Air Force) was by amendments to the National Security Act of 1947 made subordinate to the Secretary of Defense. [1]

United States Secretary of the Army position

The Secretary of the Army is a senior civilian official within the Department of Defense of the United States with statutory responsibility for all matters relating to the United States Army: manpower, personnel, reserve affairs, installations, environmental issues, weapons systems and equipment acquisition, communications, and financial management.

United States Secretary of the Air Force Head of the Department of the Air Force

The Secretary of the Air Force is the head of the Department of the Air Force, a component organization within the United States Department of Defense. The Secretary of the Air Force is appointed from civilian life by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Secretary reports to the Secretary of Defense and/or the Deputy Secretary of Defense, and is by statute responsible for and has the authority to conduct all the affairs of the Department of the Air Force.

National Security Act of 1947 United States law restructuring its armed forces

The National Security Act of 1947 was a major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II. The majority of the provisions of the Act took effect on September 18, 1947, the day after the Senate confirmed James Forrestal as the first Secretary of Defense.

Responsibilities

The Department of the Navy (DoN) consists of two Uniformed Services: the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. [2] The Secretary of the Navy is responsible for, and has statutory authority (10 U.S.C.   § 5013) to "conduct all the affairs of the Department of the Navy", i.e. as its chief executive officer, subject to the limits of the law, and the directions of the President and the Secretary of Defense. In effect, all authority within the Navy and Marine Corps, unless specifically exempted by law, is derivative of the authority vested in the Secretary of the Navy.

United States Navy Naval warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the Navy is the third largest of the service branches. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March 2018, making it the second-largest air force in the world, after the United States Air Force.

United States Marine Corps Amphibious warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines or U.S. Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations with the United States Navy as well as the Army and Air Force. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

United States Secretary of Defense Leader of the United States armed forces following the President

The Secretary of Defense (SecDef) is the leader and chief executive officer of the United States Department of Defense, the executive department of the Armed Forces of the U.S. The Secretary of Defense's position of command and authority over the U.S. military is second only to that of the President and Congress, respectively. This position corresponds to what is generally known as a Defense Minister in many other countries. The Secretary of Defense is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, and is by custom a member of the Cabinet and by law a member of the National Security Council.

Specifically enumerated responsibilities of the SECNAV in the before-mentioned section are: recruiting, organizing, supplying, equipping, training, mobilizing, and demobilizing. The Secretary also oversees the construction, outfitting, and repair of naval ships, equipment, and facilities. SECNAV is responsible for the formulation and implementation of policies and programs that are consistent with the national security policies and objectives established by the President or the Secretary of Defense. [3] [4]

The Secretary of the Navy is a member of the Defense Acquisition Board (DAB), chaired by the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics. Furthermore, the Secretary has several statutory responsibilities under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) with respect to the administration of the military justice system for the Navy & the Marine Corps, including the authority to convene general courts-martial and to commute sentences.

The Defense Acquisition Board (DAB) is the senior advisory board for defense acquisitions in the Department of Defense of the United States of America. The board is chaired by the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics and includes the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Service Secretaries, and a number of Under Secretaries of Defense. The DAB plays an important role in the Defense Acquisition System. Members of this board are responsible for approving the Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAPs) and serve as the most important executive review of expensive acquisition projects that would have potentially large impacts on how wars are fought — things like new tanks, fighter aircraft, or C3 systems.

The Uniform Code of Military Justice is the foundation of military law in the United States. It was established by the United States Congress in accordance with the authority given by the United States Constitution in Article I, Section 8, which provides that "The Congress shall have Power....To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval forces".

The principal military advisers to the SECNAV are the two service chiefs of the naval services: for matters regarding the Navy the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), and for matters regarding the Marine Corps the Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC). The CNO and the Commandant act as the principal executive agents of the SECNAV within their respective services to implement the orders of the Secretary.

The United States Navy Regulations is the principal regulatory document of the Department of the Navy, and any changes to it can only be approved by the Secretary of the Navy.

U.S. Coast Guard

Whenever the United States Coast Guard operates as a service within the Department of the Navy, the Secretary of the Navy has the same powers and duties with respect to the Coast Guard as the Secretary of Homeland Security when the Coast Guard is not operating as a service in the Department of the Navy. [5]

The Navy Secretariat

The Office of the Secretary of the Navy, also known within DoD as the Navy Secretariat or simply just as the Secretariat in a DoN setting, is the immediate headquarters staff that supports the Secretary in discharging his duties. The principal officials of the Secretariat include the Under Secretary of the Navy (the Secretary's principal civilian deputy), the Assistant Secretaries of the Navy (ASN), the General Counsel of the Department of the Navy, the Judge Advocate General of the Navy (JAG), the Naval Inspector General (NIG), the Chief of Legislative Affairs, and the Chief of Naval Research. The Office of the Secretary of the Navy has sole responsibility within the Department of the Navy for acquisition, auditing, financial and information management, legislative affairs, public affairs, research, and development. [6]

The Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Marine Corps have their own separate staffs, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (also known by its acronym OPNAV) and Headquarters Marine Corps .

Secretaries of the Navy

  Denotes acting Secretaries

[7] [8]

Continental Congress

PositionPictureNameTerm of Office
Chairman of the Marine Committee US Navy 031029-N-6236G-001 A painting of President John Adams (1735-1826), 2nd president of the United States, by Asher B. Durand (1767-1845)-crop.jpg John Adams 13 October 1775 – 1779
Member of the Marine Committee John langdon.jpg John Langdon 13 October 1775–?
Member of the Marine Committee Silas Deane - Du Simitier and B.L. Prevost.jpg Silas Deane 13 October 1775–?
Member of the Marine Committee Joseph Hewes.jpg Joseph Hewes 1775 [9]
Continental Navy Board
(under Marine Committee)
6 November 1776 – 28 October 1779
Chairman of the Continental Board of Admiralty Francis Lewis.jpg Francis Lewis December 1779 – 1780
Secretary of Marine AlexanderMcdougall.jpg Alexander McDougall 7 February 1781 – 29 August 1781
Agent of Marine
(devolved onto Superintendent of Finance)
Robert Morris.jpg Robert Morris 29 August 1781 – 1784 [10]

(Post of Secretary of Marine created but remained vacant)

Executive Department 1798–1949

No.PictureNameStateTerm of OfficeServed under
1 Benjamin Stoddert SecNavy.jpg Benjamin Stoddert Maryland 18 June 1798 – 31 March 1801 John Adams/Thomas Jefferson
2 Robert Smith SecNavy.jpg Robert Smith Maryland 27 July 1801 – 4 March 1809 Thomas Jefferson
3 Paul Hamilton SecNavy.jpeg Paul Hamilton South Carolina 15 May 1809 – 31 December 1812 James Madison
4 William-Jones.jpg William Jones Pennsylvania 19 January 1813 – 1 December 1814
5 BWCrowninshield.jpg Benjamin W. Crowninshield Massachusetts 16 January 1815 – 30 September 1818
James Monroe
6 SmithThompson.jpg Smith Thompson New York 1 January 1819 – 31 August 1823
7 Samuel L. Southard SecNavy.jpg Samuel L. Southard New Jersey 16 September 1823 – 4 March 1829
John Quincy Adams
8 JohnBranch2.jpg John Branch North Carolina 9 March 1829 – 12 May 1831 Andrew Jackson
9 Levi Woodbury.jpg Levi Woodbury New Hampshire 23 May 1831 – 30 June 1834
10 Mahlon Dickerson.jpg Mahlon Dickerson New Jersey 1 July 1834 – 30 June 1838
Martin Van Buren
11 JKPaulding.jpg James K. Paulding New York 1 July 1838 – 4 March 1841
12 GEBadger-portrait.jpg George E. Badger North Carolina 6 March 1841 – 11 September 1841 William Henry Harrison
John Tyler
13 Abel P. Upshur SecNavy.jpg Abel P. Upshur Virginia 11 October 1841 – 23 July 1843
14 David Henshaw SecNavy.jpg David Henshaw Massachusetts 24 July 1843 – 18 February 1844
15 Thomas Gilmer newer.jpeg Thomas W. Gilmer Virginia 19 February 1844 – 28 February 1844
16 JYMason.jpg John Y. Mason Virginia 26 March 1844 – 4 March 1845
17 George Bancroft United States Secretary of Navy c. 1860.jpg George Bancroft Massachusetts 11 March 1845 – 9 September 1846 James Knox Polk
18 JYMason.jpg John Y. Mason Virginia 10 September 1846 – 4 March 1849
19 WmBdPreston.jpg William B. Preston Virginia 8 March 1849 – 22 July 1850 Zachary Taylor
20 William Alexander Graham - Brady-Handy.jpg William A. Graham North Carolina 2 August 1850 – 25 July 1852 Millard Fillmore
21 JohnKennedy.jpg John P. Kennedy Maryland 26 July 1852 – 4 March 1853
22 JCDobbin.jpg James C. Dobbin North Carolina 8 March 1853 – 4 March 1857 Franklin Pierce
23 Isaac Toucey - Brady-Handy.jpg Isaac Toucey Connecticut 7 March 1857 – 4 March 1861 James Buchanan
24 Gideon Welles - Ambrotype.jpg Gideon Welles Connecticut 7 March 1861 – 4 March 1869 Abraham Lincoln
Andrew Johnson
25 Adolph Borie, Brady-Handy bw photo portrait, ca1860-1875.jpg Adolph E. Borie Pennsylvania 9 March 1869 – 25 June 1869 Ulysses S. Grant
26 George Robeson 1865 1880.jpg George M. Robeson New Jersey 26 June 1869 – 4 March 1877
(acting) William Faxon cropped.jpg William Faxon 4 March 1877 – 13 March 1877 Rutherford B. Hayes
27 RWThompson.jpg Richard W. Thompson Indiana 13 March 1877 – 20 December 1880
28 Nathan Goff, Jr. - Brady-Handy.jpg Nathan Goff, Jr. West Virginia 7 January 1881 – 4 March 1881
29 William-Henry-Hunt.jpg William H. Hunt Louisiana 7 March 1881 – 16 April 1882 James Garfield
Chester A. Arthur
30 Wm Eaton Chandler.jpg William E. Chandler New Hampshire 16 April 1882 – 4 March 1885
31 William Collins Whitney by Charles Milton Bell c1892.jpg William C. Whitney New York 7 March 1885 – 4 March 1889 Grover Cleveland
32 BFTracy.jpg Benjamin F. Tracy New York 6 March 1889 – 4 March 1893 Benjamin Harrison
33 Hilary A. Herbert.jpg Hilary A. Herbert Alabama 7 March 1893 – 4 March 1897 Grover Cleveland
34 JDLong.jpg John D. Long Massachusetts 6 March 1897 – 30 April 1902 William McKinley
Theodore Roosevelt
35 WHMoody.jpg William H. Moody Massachusetts 1 May 1902 – 30 June 1904
36 Paul Morton.jpg Paul Morton Illinois 1 July 1904 – 30 June 1905
37 CJBonaparte.jpg Charles J. Bonaparte Maryland 1 July 1905 – 16 December 1906
38 VHMetcalf.jpeg Victor H. Metcalf California 17 December 1906 – 30 November 1908
39 Truman Handy Newberry.jpg Truman H. Newberry Michigan 1 December 1908 – 4 March 1909
40 GvLMeyer.jpg George von Lengerke Meyer Massachusetts 6 March 1909 – 4 March 1913 William Howard Taft
41 Josephus Daniels 1.jpg Josephus Daniels North Carolina 5 March 1913 – 4 March 1921 Woodrow Wilson
42 ECDenby.jpg Edwin C. Denby Michigan 6 March 1921 – 10 March 1924 Warren G. Harding
Calvin Coolidge
(acting) Theodore Roosevelt Jr. 1921.jpg Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. 10 March 1924 – 19 March 1924
43 Curtis Dwight Wilbur.jpg Curtis D. Wilbur California 19 March 1924 – 4 March 1929
44 CharlesAdamsIII.jpg Charles F. Adams III Massachusetts 5 March 1929 – 4 March 1933 Herbert Hoover
45 Claude Augustus Swanson.jpg Claude A. Swanson Virginia 4 March 1933 – 7 July 1939 Franklin D. Roosevelt
46 Charles Edison.jpg Charles Edison New Jersey 7 July 1939 – 2 January 1940
2 January 1940 – 24 June 1940
(acting) Lewis Compton (Assistant Secretary of the Navy).jpg Lewis Compton 24 June 1940 – 11 July 1940
47 Fknox.jpg Frank Knox Illinois 11 July 1940 – 28 April 1944
(acting) Ralph Bard 1922.jpg Ralph A. Bard 28 April 1944 – 19 May 1944
48 James Forrestal - SecOfDef.jpg James V. Forrestal New York 19 May 1944 – 17 September 1947
Harry S. Truman
49 John L Sullivan SecofNavy.jpg John L. Sullivan 18 September 194724 May 1949
50 Francis P. Matthews.jpg Francis P. Matthews 25 May 194910 August 1949

Military Department (Department of Defense) 1949–present

No.ImageNameTerm of OfficeServed under:
BeganEndedDays of Service Secretary President
50 Francis P. Matthews.jpg Francis P. Matthews 10 August 194931 July 1951797 Louis A. Johnson
George C. Marshall
Harry S. Truman
51 DanAKimball.jpg Dan A. Kimball 31 July 195120 January 1953539 George C. Marshall
Robert A. Lovett
52 Robert B Anderson.jpeg Robert B. Anderson 4 February 19533 March 1954392 Charles E. Wilson Dwight D. Eisenhower
53 CharlesSThomas.jpg Charles S. Thomas 3 May 19541 April 19571064
54 Thomas Gates official DoD photo.jpg Thomas S. Gates, Jr. 1 April 19578 June 1959798 Charles E. Wilson
Neil H. McElroy
55 WilliamBFranke.jpg William B. Franke 8 June 195919 January 1961591 Neil H. McElroy
Thomas S. Gates, Jr.
56 John Connally.jpg John B. Connally 25 January 196120 December 1961329 Robert S. McNamara John F. Kennedy
57 FredKorth.jpg Fred Korth 4 January 19621 November 1963666
(acting) PaulBFay.jpg Paul B. Fay 2 November 196328 November 196326 John F. Kennedy
Lyndon B. Johnson
58 Paul Nitze.jpeg Paul H. Nitze 29 November 196330 June 19671309 Lyndon B. Johnson
(acting) Charles F. Baird 1 July 196731 August 196761
59 Ignatius, Paul Robert.jpg Paul R. Ignatius 1 September 196724 January 1969511 Robert S. McNamara
Clark Clifford
Melvin R. Laird
Lyndon B. Johnson
Richard M. Nixon
60 John Chafee.jpg John H. Chafee 31 January 19694 May 19721189 Melvin R. Laird Richard M. Nixon
61 John W Warner Sec of Navy.jpg John W. Warner 4 May 19728 April 1974704 Melvin R. Laird
Elliot Richardson
James R. Schlesinger
62 JohnWilliamMiddendorf.jpg J. William Middendorf 8 April 197420 January 19771018 James R. Schlesinger
Donald H. Rumsfeld
Richard M. Nixon
Gerald Ford
63 W. Graham Claytor 1984.jpg W. Graham Claytor, Jr. 14 February 197724 August 1979921 Harold Brown Jimmy Carter
64 Edward Hidalgo, head and shoulders, facing front.jpg Edward Hidalgo 24 October 197920 January 1981454
65 John Lehman, official photo as Secretary of the Navy, 1982.JPEG John Lehman 5 February 198110 April 19872255 Caspar W. Weinberger Ronald Reagan
66 James Webb, Assistant Secretary of Defense, official photo.JPEG Jim Webb 1 May 198723 February 1988298 Caspar W. Weinberger
Frank C. Carlucci
67 William L Ball.jpg William L. Ball 28 March 198815 May 1989413 Frank C. Carlucci
Richard B. Cheney
Ronald Reagan
George H. W. Bush
68 Henry Lawrence Garrett III, official Navy photo, 1987.jpg Henry L. Garrett III 15 May 198926 June 19921138 Richard B. Cheney George H. W. Bush
(acting) Daniel Howard 26 June 19927 July 199211
69 Sean O'Keefe, official Navy photo, 1992.jpg Sean O'Keefe 7 July 19922 October 199287
2 October 199220 January 1993110
(acting) Admiral Frank Kelso, official military photo.JPEG Admiral Frank B. Kelso II 20 January 199321 July 1993182 Les Aspin Bill Clinton
70 DaltonJohn.jpg John H. Dalton 22 July 199316 November 19981943 Les Aspin
William J. Perry
William S. Cohen
71 Richard Danzig, official Navy photo.jpg Richard Danzig 16 November 199820 January 2001796 William S. Cohen
(acting) Robert Pirie, official photo portrait, circa 2001.jpg Robert B. Pirie, Jr. 20 January 200124 May 2001124 Donald H. Rumsfeld George W. Bush
72 Gordon England portrait.jpg Gordon R. England 24 May 200130 January 2003616
(acting) US Navy 030202-N-0000X-001 Under Secretary of the Navy.jpg Susan Livingstone 30 January 20037 February 20038
(acting) US Navy 030402-N-0000X-001 Secretary of the Navy Hansford T. Johnson (Acting).jpg Hansford T. Johnson 7 February 200330 September 2003235
73 Gordon England portrait.jpg Gordon R. England 1 October 200329 December 2005 [11] 820
(acting) AvilesDionel.jpg Dionel M. Aviles 29 December 2005 [11] 3 January 2006 [11] 5
74 Donald Winter, official photo as Secretary of the Navy, 2006.jpg Donald C. Winter 3 January 2006 [11] 13 March 2009 [12] 1165 Donald H. Rumsfeld
Robert M. Gates
George W. Bush
Barack Obama
(acting) PennBJ.jpg B. J. Penn 13 March 2009 [12] 19 May 2009 [13] 67 Robert M. Gates Barack Obama
75 SECNAV-Mabus-OfficialPhoto2-2014.jpg Ray Mabus 19 May 2009 [12] 20 January 20172803 Robert M. Gates
Leon Panetta
Chuck Hagel
Ash Carter
(acting) Sean J. Stackley.jpg Sean Stackley 20 January 20173 August 2017195 Jim Mattis

Patrick M. Shanahan

Donald Trump
76 Richard V. Spencer.jpg Richard V. Spencer 3 August 2017Incumbent620

See also

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References

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  11. 1 2 3 4 Staff reporter (29 December 2005). "Acting Deputy Defense Secretary Relinquishes Top Navy Post". American Forces Press Service. Retrieved 18 May 2009. Navy Undersecretary Dionel M. Aviles will serve as acting Navy secretary effective today. Donald Winter, who was confirmed by the Senate last month, will be sworn in as the 74th secretary of the Navy on Jan. 3.
  12. 1 2 3 "Navy Secretary Departs Office" (Press release). United States Department of Defense. 13 March 2009. Retrieved 18 May 2009. The 74th Secretary of the Navy, Donald C. Winter, resigned his office today as planned. Winter had agreed to remain in office until March 13, 2009, to ease the transition of the Department of Defense. [...] BJ Penn will be the acting Secretary of the Navy until the Senate confirms a nominee chosen by President Barack Obama.
  13. Staff reporter (19 May 2005). "Mabus Sworn in as New Navy Secretary". NNS. Retrieved 20 May 2009. Ray Mabus, former Mississippi governor and U.S. ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was sworn in May 19 as the 75th secretary of the Navy. (Archived by WebCite at WebCite)