United States v. Morgan

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United States v. Morgan is the name of a number of noted court cases:

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Irene Morgan American activist

Irene Amos Morgan, later known as Irene Morgan Kirkaldy, was an African-American woman from Baltimore, Maryland, who was arrested in Middlesex County, Virginia, in 1944 under a state law imposing racial segregation in public facilities and transportation. She was traveling on an interstate bus that operated under federal law and regulations. She refused to give up her seat in what the driver said was the "white section". At the time she worked for a defense contractor on the production line for B-26 Marauders.

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Morgan v. U.S. is the name of a number of noted Supreme Court cases:

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