University of Texas System

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The University of Texas System
UofTsystem seal.svg
MottoDisciplina Praesidium Civitatis
(Latin for "Cultivated mind is the guardian genius of democracy")
Type State university system
Established1876
Endowment $26.535 billion (2018) [1]
Budget$17.9 billion (2017) [2]
Chancellor James Milliken
Academic staff
17,158 [3]
Administrative staff
62,982 [3]
Students221,337 (2017)
Undergraduates 167,028 [2]
Postgraduates 54,309 [2]
Colors Navy blue, orange, and tan
              
Website www.utsystem.edu
USA Texas location map.svg
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University of Texas System Locations.

The University of Texas System (UT System) is a government entity of the state of Texas that oversees 14 educational institutions throughout the state including eight universities and six health institutions. The UT System is headquartered in Downtown Austin, and has a total enrollment of over 216,000 students (largest university system in Texas) and employs more than 87,000 faculty and staff. The UT System's $24 billion endowment (as of the 2016 fiscal year) is the largest of any public university system in the United States. [4] As of 2018, Reuters ranks the UT System among the top 10 most innovative academic institutions in the world. [5] [6]

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, and has a coastline with the Gulf of Mexico to the southeast.

Downtown Austin human settlement in Austin, Texas, United States of America

Downtown Austin is the central business district of Austin, Texas. Downtown is located on the north bank of the Colorado River. The approximate borders of Downtown include Lamar Boulevard to the west, Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard and the University of Texas at Austin to the north, Interstate 35 to the east, and Lady Bird Lake to the south.

Austin, Texas Capital of Texas

Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County, with portions extending into Hays and Williamson counties. It is the 11th-most populous city in the United States and the 4th-most populous city in Texas. It is also the fastest growing large city in the United States, the second most populous state capital after Phoenix, Arizona, and the southernmost state capital in the contiguous United States. As of the U.S. Census Bureau's July 1, 2017 estimate, Austin had a population of 950,715 up from 790,491 at the 2010 census. The city is the cultural and economic center of the Austin–Round Rock metropolitan statistical area, which had an estimated population of 2,168,316 as of July 1, 2018. Located in Central Texas within the greater Texas Hill Country, it is home to numerous lakes, rivers, and waterways, including Lady Bird Lake and Lake Travis on the Colorado River, Barton Springs, McKinney Falls, and Lake Walter E. Long.

Contents

Component institutions

Academic institutions

The University of Texas System has eight separate and distinct academic institutions; each institution is a stand-alone university and confers its own degrees. Its oldest and flagship institution is The University of Texas at Austin.

University of Texas at Austin public research university in Austin, Texas, United States

The University of Texas at Austin is a public research university in Austin, Texas. It was founded in 1883 and is the flagship institution of the University of Texas System. The University of Texas was inducted into the Association of American Universities in 1929, becoming only the third university in the American South to be elected. The institution has the nation's eighth-largest single-campus enrollment, with over 50,000 undergraduate and graduate students and over 24,000 faculty and staff.

Official nameOfficial
abbrev.
LocationEstab.Joined
system
Enrollment
(Fall 2017)
Refs
The University of Texas at Arlington UTA Arlington 1895196541,933 [7] [8] [9]
The University of Texas at Austin UT Austin 188351,525 [10] [11] [12]
The University of Texas at Dallas UTD Richardson 1961196927,642 [13] [14] [15]
The University of Texas at El Paso UTEP El Paso 1913196725,078 [16] [17] [18] [19] [20]
The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley UTRGV Brownsville, Edinburg, [n 1]
Harlingen, McAllen, Rio Grande City
2015 [n 1] 27,809 [21] [22] [23] [24] [25]
The University of Texas at San Antonio UTSA San Antonio 196930,674 [21] [22] [23] [24]
The University of Texas at Tyler UTT Tyler 1971197910,527 [26] [27] [28]
The University of Texas of the Permian Basin UTPB Odessa 19737,628 [29] [30] [31]
Notes
  1. 1 2 UTRGV was formally founded in 2013 by the merger of UT Brownsville and UTPA, but did not begin operation until 2015.

Former institutions merged

Official nameOfficial
abbrev.
LocationFoundedJoined
system
MergedRefs
The University of Texas at Brownsville UTB Brownsville 197319912015
(merged to form The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley)
[32] [33]
The University of Texas–Pan American UTPA Edinburg 19271989 [34] [35]

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

On June 14, 2013, Texas Governor Rick Perry signed SB 24 into law, officially approving the creation of a new university in South Texas within the UT System, officially replacing UT-Brownsville and UT-Pan American. The initiative resulted in a single institution, including a medical school, spanning the entire Rio Grande Valley, with a presence in each of the major metropolitan areas of Brownsville, Edinburg, Harlingen, and McAllen. On December 12, 2013, the UT Board of Regents voted to name the new university the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. [36] The new university began full operation in the 2015–16 school year.

University of Texas at Brownsville defunct university

The University of Texas at Brownsville was an educational institution located in Brownsville, Texas. The university was on the land once occupied by Fort Brown. It was a member of the University of Texas System. The institution was formed from a 1991 partnership between the two-year Texas Southmost College and University of Texas-Pan American at Brownsville. The partnership ended in 2011 as UTB became a standalone University of Texas institution, and Texas Southmost College returned to being an independent community college. UTB itself offered baccalaureate and graduate degrees in liberal arts, sciences, education, business, and professional programs.

University of Texas–Pan American defunct university

The University of Texas–Pan American (UTPA) was a state university located in Edinburg, Texas. Founded in 1927, it was a component institution of the University of Texas System. The university served the Rio Grande Valley and South Texas with baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral degrees. The Carnegie Foundation classified UTPA as a "doctoral research university". From the institution's founding until it was merged into the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), it grew from 200 students to over 20,000, making UTPA the tenth-largest university in the state of Texas. The majority of these students were natives of the Rio Grande Valley. UTPA also operated an Upper Level Studies Center in Rio Grande City, Starr County, Texas. On August 15, 2014, Dr. Havidan Rodriguez was appointed interim President of UTPA, the institution's final leader.

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine is a public medical school of University of Texas Rio Grande Valley located in Edinburg, Texas. It is in the preliminary stages of being accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME). The UTRGV School of Medicine was established by the Texas Legislature in May 2013. The medical school enrolled its first class of 50 first-year medical students in the fall of 2016.

Health institutions

In addition to eight academic institutions, the University of Texas System also has six standalone health institutions. Two of the academic institutions also house medical schools.

The 1890 Ashbel Smith building on the campus of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Ashbel Smith Building UTMB Galveston.jpg
The 1890 Ashbel Smith building on the campus of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston UTHealth is the most comprehensive academic health center in The UT System and the U.S. Gulf Coast region. UTHealth educates more healthcare professionals than any health-related institution in the State of Texas

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) was created in 1972 by The University of Texas System Board of Regents. UTHealth is located in Houston, Texas, in the Texas Medical Center, which is considered the largest medical center in the world. It is composed of six schools: John P. and Kathrine G. McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, UTHealth School of Dentistry, Cizik School of Nursing, UTHealth School of Biomedical Informatics and UTHealth School of Public Health.

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, d/b/a UT Health San Antonio is an institute of health science education and research located in the South Texas Medical Center, the medical district of the U.S. city of San Antonio, Texas. It is a component of the University of Texas System.

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Hospital in Texas, United States of America

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is one of the original three comprehensive cancer centers in the United States. It is both a degree-granting academic institution, and a cancer treatment and research center located at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. It is affiliated with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Student profile

Racial and/or ethnic background (2015)
Students [37] Texas [38] United States [39]
Asian 11%5%6%
Black 7%13%13%
Hispanic
(of any race, includes Tejanos and White Hispanics)
39%39%18%
Non-Hispanic White 30%43%61%
International student 9%N/AN/A
Other races or unknown4%3%N/A

Administration

O. Henry Hall, the former main administrative building for the system, is in Downtown Austin OHenryHall.JPG
O. Henry Hall, the former main administrative building for the system, is in Downtown Austin

The administrative offices are in Downtown Austin. [40] The UT system approved moving the system headquarters in November 2012. [41] Bonds from the UT System's endowment funded the construction of the new 19-story, 330,000-square-foot (31,000 m2) headquarters, which had a price tag of $102 million. The UT system planned to lease a portion of the facility for shops and other offices, with the approximately 200,000-square-foot (19,000 m2) remaining portion used for its own employees. [42] The system headquarters, named Replacement Office Building (ROB), were scheduled to open on August 1, 2017. [43]

The University of Texas System was previously headquartered in O. Henry Hall in Downtown Austin. [44] The system headquarters complex previously included multiple buildings, which had 550 employees in 2014. [42] These faciliies included O. Henry Hall, Claudia Taylor Johnson Hall (named after Lady Bird Johnson), Ashbel Smith Hall, the Colorado Building, the Lavaca Building, and the Norwood Tower. Parking garages serving the complex include Parking Garage I, Parking Garage II, Parking Garage III, 300 West 6th Street Parking Garage, and the garage between the Colorado and Lavaca buildings. [45]

In 2013 the UT system approved the demolitions of the Colorado Building and the Lavaca Building, [41] and the new UT headquarters was built where these buildings previously stood. [42] The Texas State University System purchased O. Henry Hall in 2015 for $8.2 million; [41] the UT System leased it and continued using it as its administrative headquarters prior to the 2017 completion of the UT System's current headquarters. [46] The UT system replaced Claudia Taylor Johnson Hall and Ashbel Smith Hall with a commercial property that used the façade of Johnson Hall and is leased by Trammell Crow. [41] The Ashbel Smith name is no longer used due to his involvement in the Confederate States of America. [43] Ashbel Smith Hall was promptly imploded on March 25, 2018. [47]

Coordinated Admissions Program

The Coordinated Admissions Program (more colloquially known as "CAP") offers some UT Austin applicants the chance to attend the university if they complete their freshman year at another system school and meet specified requirements. [48] Each institution in the University of Texas System sets its own admissions standards, and not all schools may accept a particular CAP student. [48] UT Dallas does not participate in the CAP program, and UTSA, the largest recipient of CAP students, has stated it will be phasing out the program within the next ten years. [49] [50]

See also

Notes

  1. U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Endowment Market Value and Change* in Endowment Market Value from FY2016 to FY2017 Retrieved on 17 August 2018
  2. 1 2 3
  3. 1 2 "2006 figure" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on June 16, 2007. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  4. "The 10 richest public universities in America" . Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  5. "UT System among top 10 most academic institutions in the world". University of Texas System. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  6. "Reuters Top 100: The World's Most Innovative Universities - 2017". Reuters. September 27, 2017. Retrieved March 20, 2018 via Reuters.
  7. "University of Texas at Arlington". US News. Retrieved November 23, 2011.
  8. "The University of Texas at Arlington". College Portraits. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  9. "UTA Enrollment Climbs 6.1 Percent to Record 37,000 Texas-Based Students". September 15, 2015. Retrieved November 6, 2015.
  10. "2011–2012 Fiscal Year Funds & Finances Analysis" (PDF). UT Austin Office of Information Management and Analysis. January 18, 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 26, 2013. Retrieved February 15, 2012.
  11. "The University of Texas at Austin". College Portraits. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  12. "Facts & Figures | The University of Texas at Austin". utexas.edu. Retrieved November 6, 2015.
  13. "UT Dallas Announces 1st Comprehensive Campaign" . Retrieved April 20, 2012.
  14. "UTD". College Portraits. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  15. "Fast Facts - Parents and Families - UTD" . Retrieved November 6, 2015.
  16. "UTEP". US News. Retrieved November 23, 2011.
  17. "UTEP". College Portraits. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  18. Benedict, Harry Y. (1917). A Source Book Relating to the History of the University of Texas. Austin: University of Texas. p. 492.
  19. "UTEP Facts Brochure". Archived from the original on 21 October 2015. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  20. "UTEP's Fall 2017 Enrollment Reaches All-Time High".
  21. 1 2 "UTSA". US News. Retrieved November 23, 2011.
  22. 1 2 "UTSA Fact Book 2011 (New Undergraduates Section)". Office of Institutional Research. Retrieved April 28, 2012.
  23. 1 2 "The University of Texas at San Antonio". College Portrait. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  24. 1 2 "Fast Facts - About - UTSA" . Retrieved November 6, 2015.
  25. "UTRGV - UTRGV welcomes 29,045 #FirstClass students on first day". www.utrgv.edu. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  26. "UT Tyler". US News. Retrieved November 23, 2011.
  27. "UT-Tyler". College Portraits. Retrieved February 21, 2013.
  28. "UT Tyler Fast Facts" . Retrieved November 6, 2015.
  29. "UTPB". US News. Retrieved November 23, 2011.
  30. "UTPB". College Portraits. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  31. "UTPB | Quick Facts". utpb.edu. Retrieved November 6, 2015.
  32. "University of Texas Brownsville". US News. Retrieved November 23, 2011.
  33. "UTBSC". College Portraits. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  34. "UTPA". US News. Retrieved November 23, 2011.
  35. "The University of Texas-Pan American". College Portrait. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  36. Fischler, Jacob. "Regents name university: UT-RGV". The Monitor. Retrieved December 12, 2013.
  37. (PDF) https://www.utsystem.edu/sites/default/files/documents/facts%2C-figures-and-data/Fast%20Facts%202016/Fast_Facts_2016_Feb2017_v2Update.pdf . Retrieved March 25, 2018.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  38. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/48000.html
  39. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/00000.html
  40. "Contact Us." University of Texas System. Retrieved on November 19, 2017. "Address The University of Texas System 210 West 7th Street Austin, TX 78701-2982"
  41. 1 2 3 4 "Redevelopment of UT System downtown property will generate millions in revenue for city". University of Texas System. February 2, 2017. Retrieved November 19, 2017.
  42. 1 2 3 Haurwitz, Ralph K.M. (February 27, 2014). "University of Texas System to build $102 million headquarters downtown". Austin American-Statesman . Retrieved November 19, 2017. - Alternate link
  43. 1 2 Herman, Ken (July 4, 2017). "Herman: Move-in day nears for UT System Replacement Office Building". Austin American-Statesman . Archived from the original on November 19, 2017. Retrieved November 19, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  44. "UT System Contact Information." University of Texas System. October 6, 2009. Retrieved on November 19, 2017. "UT System Contact Information General Contact Information 601 Colorado Street Austin TX 78701-2982 "
  45. "Parking Map." University of Texas at Austin. Retrieved on June 21, 2010.
  46. "Regents Approve Purchase of O. Henry Hall from UT System" (Press release). Austin, Texas: Texas State University System. May 21, 2015. Retrieved November 19, 2017.
  47. "WATCH: Former UT building in downtown Austin brought down by implosion". KEPR-TV . March 25, 2018. Retrieved March 25, 2018.
  48. 1 2 "Information about CAP". Be a Longhorn. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  49. "UTSA to phase out CAP Program Archived 2013-01-21 at the Wayback Machine ". The Paisano. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  50. "CAP students love UTSA, for now Archived 2012-04-30 at the Wayback Machine ". The Paisano. Retrieved November 23, 2012.

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