University of Wales

Last updated

University of Wales
Welsh: Prifysgol Cymru
University of Wales.svg
MottoGoreu Awen Gwirionedd
(The Best Inspiration is Truth)
Type Confederal, non-membership university [1]
Established1893
Chancellor Prince Charles, The Prince of Wales
Vice-Chancellor Medwin Hughes
Location, ,
UK
Colours
Affiliations Association of Commonwealth Universities
Website http://www.wales.ac.uk/
Cymrulogo.png

The University of Wales (Welsh: Prifysgol Cymru) was a confederal university based in Cardiff, Wales, UK. Founded by Royal Charter in 1893 as a federal university with three constituent colleges – Aberystwyth, Bangor and Cardiff – the university was the first and oldest university in Wales, one of the four countries in the United Kingdom. The university was the second largest university in the UK.

Contents

A federal university similar to the University of London, the University of Wales was in charge of examining students, while its colleges were in charge of teaching. Historically, the University of Wales was the only university in Wales until the establishment of the University of Glamorgan in 1992.

Former colleges under the University of Wales included most universities in Wales: Aberystwyth University (formerly University of Wales, Aberystwyth), Bangor University (formerly University of Wales, Bangor), St David's University College (later University of Wales, Lampeter, and now merged with University of Wales Trinity Saint David), Cardiff University (formerly University of Wales, Cardiff), Swansea University (formerly University of Wales, Swansea), Cardiff Metropolitan University (formerly University of Wales Institute, Cardiff) and University of Wales, Newport (which merged with Glamorgan University in April 2013 to form the University of South Wales).

In 2007, the University of Wales changed from a federal structure to a confederal one and many of the constituent colleges became independent universities. Following a number of controversies in the late 2000s involving overseas affiliates and student visas, a decision was made to abolish the university as it then existed. From August 2017 it has been functionally integrated with the University of Wales Trinity Saint David.

History

Origins

University College Wales (now Aberystwyth University) was the oldest founding member of the University of Wales Aberystwyth Old University Building.jpg
University College Wales (now Aberystwyth University) was the oldest founding member of the University of Wales

The University of Wales was founded in Wales in 1893 as a federal university with three foundation colleges: University College Wales (now Aberystwyth University), which had been founded in 1872; University College North Wales (now Bangor University); University College South Wales and Monmouthshire (now Cardiff University). The last two had been founded following the Aberdare Report in 1881. Prior to the foundation of the federal university, these three colleges had prepared students for the examinations of the University of London.

A fourth college, Swansea (now Swansea University), was added in 1920 and in 1931 the Welsh National School of Medicine was incorporated. In 1967 the Welsh College of Advanced Technology entered the federal university as the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology (UWIST), also in Cardiff. In 1971 St David's College (now part of the University of Wales: Trinity Saint David), Wales' oldest degree-awarding institution, suspended its own degree-awarding powers and entered the University of Wales.

A financial crisis in the late eighties caused UWIST and University College Cardiff to merge in 1988, forming the University of Wales College Cardiff (UWCC). In 1992 the university lost its position as the only university in Wales when the Polytechnic of Wales became the University of Glamorgan (now part of the new University of South Wales).

Re-organisation

The university was composed of colleges until 1996, when the university was reorganised with a two-tier structure of member institutions in order to absorb the Cardiff Institute of Higher Education (which became the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC), now known as Cardiff Metropolitan University) and the Gwent College of Higher Education (which became University of Wales College, Newport (UWCN)). The existing colleges became constituent institutions and the two new member institutions became university colleges. In 2003, both of these colleges became full constituent institutions and in 2004 UWCN received permission from the Privy Council to change its name to the University of Wales, Newport.

Cardiff University and the University of Wales College of Medicine (UWCM) merged on 1 August 2004. The merged institution, known as Cardiff University, ceased to be a constituent institution and joined a new category of 'Affiliated/Linked Institutions'. While the new institution continued to award University of Wales degrees in medicine and related subjects, students joining Cardiff from 2005 to study other subjects were awarded Cardiff University degrees.[ needs update ]

At the same time, the university admitted four new institutions. Thus, North East Wales Institute of Higher Education (NEWI), Swansea Institute of Higher Education and Trinity College, Carmarthen (who were all previously Associated Institutions) along with the Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama (which was previously a Validated Institution) were admitted as full members of the university on 27 July 2004.

The Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama subsequently left the university in January 2007. More changes followed in September 2007 when the university changed from a federal structure to a confederation of independent institutions, allowing those individual institutions which had gained the status of universities in their own right to use the title of university – these institutions are Aberystwyth University, Bangor University, Glyndŵr University (formerly the North East Wales Institute of Higher Education (NEWI)), Swansea Metropolitan University and Swansea University.

In November 2008, Aberystwyth, Bangor and Swansea Universities decided to exercise their right to register students to study for their own awarded degrees.

Scandal and merger

In 2010 the university broke its links with a Malaysian college after it was discovered its director had bogus qualifications, while a Thai institution linked to the university was found to be operating illegally. In June 2011, a report from the Quality Assurance Agency found that the university had not run the necessary checks on institutes delivering courses it validated, and instructed it to review all of its validation arrangements. [2] In October, the University announced that it would cease validating courses, just before news broke that one of its affiliated colleges in London was involved in a visa fraud. [3] [4] [5] This led to calls from the vice chancellors of the universities of Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cardiff, Glamorgan and Swansea for the University of Wales to be wound up. [6]

It was announced later in October that the University of Wales would be "effectively abolished", and merged into the University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD). [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] which itself merged with Swansea Metropolitan University [12] on 1 August 2013. In August 2017 a deed of union was approved by the University of Wales and UWTSD, which integrated the two universities into a single functional body. As of January 2018 the full legal constitutional merger has not been finalised. [13] [14]

Central services

The University of Wales registry building, Cathays Park Cardiff 13737 University of Wales Registry 01.JPG
The University of Wales registry building, Cathays Park

The administrative office of the University of Wales is located in Cardiff's Civic Centre. In addition to its work with the accredited institutions in Wales, the university also validates schemes of study at some 130 centres in the UK and across the world, though it is currently in the process of bringing this current validation model to a close. It runs a highly rated research centre, the Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies (incorporating the Welsh Dictionary Unit), which is adjacent to the National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth. [15] The first edition of Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru (The University of Wales Dictionary), which has the same status for Welsh as the OED does for English, was completed in 2002, eighty-two years after it had been started. The University of Wales Press [16] was founded in 1922 and publishes around seventy books a year in both English and Welsh. The university also has a study and conference centre at Gregynog, near Newtown. [17]

Former colleges and member institutions

Current nameFormer namesEstablishedJoinedLeftLocation
Aberystwyth University University College Wales; University of Wales, Aberystwyth1872 [18] 1893 [18] 2007 [19] Aberystwyth
Bangor University University College of North Wales; University of Wales, Bangor1884 [20] 1893 [20] 2007 [20] Bangor
Cardiff University University College South Wales and Monmouthshire; University College Cardiff1883 [21] [22] 1893 [21] [22] 1988 (merger) [21] [22] Cardiff
Welsh College of Advanced Technology; University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology1866 [21] 1968 [21] 1988 (merger) [21] [22] Cardiff
University of Wales College of Cardiff; University of Wales, Cardiff1988 (merger) [21] [22] 1988 (merger) [21] [22] 2004 (merger) [21] [22] Cardiff
University of Wales College of Medicine1931 [22] 1931 [22] 2004 (merger) [21] [22] Cardiff
Cardiff Metropolitan University South Glamorgan Institute of Higher Education; Cardiff Institute of Higher Education; University of Wales Institute Cardiff1865 [23] 1996 [24] 2011 [23] Cardiff
University of South Wales Gwent College of Higher Education; University of Wales College, Newport; University of Wales, Newport 1841 [25] 1996 [24] 2013 [26] Newport
Cardiff College of Music; Welsh College of Music & Drama; Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama 1949 [27] 2004 [24] 2007 [24] Cardiff
(Also takes in the University of Glamorgan, which was never part of the University of Wales) [26]
Swansea University University College Swansea; University of Wales, Swansea192019202007 Swansea
University of Wales Trinity Saint David St David's College, Lampeter; University of Wales, Lampeter1822 [28] 1971 [28] 2010 [28] Lampeter
Trinity College, Carmarthen; Trinity University College 1848 [28] 2004 [24] 2010 [28] Carmarthen
West Glamorgan Institute of Higher Education; Swansea Institute of Higher Education; Swansea Metropolitan University 1853 [28] 2004 [24] 2008 [28] Swansea
Wrexham Glyndŵr University Wrexham School of Science and Art; North East Wales Institute; Glyndŵr University1887 [29] 2004 [29] 2008 [29] Wrexham

In September 2007, three universities applied for a change to their Royal Charters to give them the power to award their own degrees, instead of University of Wales degrees. Aberystwyth University, Bangor University, and Swansea University now all award their own degrees. [30] [31]

The University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD) already had its own degree awarding powers, inherited from Saint David's College, Lampeter, which were put into abeyance when Lampeter joined the University of Wales in 1971. From then on, Lampeter awarded Wales degrees but its own licences and diplomas. When the merger between UWTSD and the University of Wales is complete, the new unified institution will award degrees under the historic 1828 Royal Charter of Saint David's College.

Cardiff University and the University of Wales College of Medicine were full members of the University of Wales but left following their merger in 2004. The merged institute awarded its own degrees to students admitted since 2005, except in medicine and related subjects which continued to be awarded University of Wales degrees until 2011. Cardiff University had previously merged with the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology, another college of the University of Wales, in 1988.

The Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama became a member of the University of Wales in 2004 but left in 2007, when it merged with the University of Glamorgan, although retaining is separate identity. [32] The University of Glamorgan subsequently merged with the University of Wales, Newport, another former member of the University of Wales, in 2013 to form the University of South Wales

Former validated institutions

A number of institutions were not accredited by the university, but had some of their courses validated by it. [33] There was some publicity and questioning of the quality of these external courses, [34] [35] [36] [37] and in October 2011, in response to changes in higher education in Wales, including the university's merger, the university announced that it would launch a new academic strategy which would see the institution only award degrees to students on courses designed and fully controlled by the university. All existing students at validated institutions are able to continue the remainder of their studies for a University of Wales award and will have continuous support. [38] [39] [40]

List of Vice-Chancellors of the University of Wales

The appointment of Vice-Chancellor of the University of Wales is held by a head of one of its constituent colleges/universities.

Notable alumni

See also

Related Research Articles

Rhodri Morgan First Minister of Wales

Hywel Rhodri Morgan was a Welsh Labour politician who was the First Minister of Wales and the Leader of Welsh Labour from 2000 to 2009. He was also the Assembly Member for Cardiff West from 1999 to 2011 and the Member of Parliament for Cardiff West from 1987 to 2001. He was, as of 2018, the longest-serving First Minister of Wales. He was elected Chancellor of Swansea University on 24 October 2011.

Since 1 April 1996, Wales has been divided into 22 single-tier principal areas for local government purposes. The elected councils of these areas are responsible for the provision of all local government services, including education, social work, environmental protection, and most highways. Below these there are also elected community councils to which responsibility for specific aspects of the application of local policy may be devolved.

Cardiff University public research university in Cardiff, United Kingdom

Cardiff University is a public research university in Cardiff, Wales. Founded in 1883 as the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, it became a founding college of the University of Wales in 1893, and in 1997 received its own degree-awarding powers, although it held them in abeyance. It merged with the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology (UWIST) in 1988. The college adopted the public name of Cardiff University in 1999; in 2005 this became its legal name, as an independent university awarding its own degrees. The third oldest university institution in Wales, it contains three colleges: Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Biomedical and Life Sciences; and Physical Sciences and Engineering.

Education in Wales differs in certain respects from education elsewhere in the United Kingdom. For example, a significant minority of students all over Wales are educated either wholly or largely through the medium of Welsh: in 2014/15, 15.7% of children and young people received Welsh-medium education - a drop from the 15.9% in 2010/11. And additional 10% attend schools which had a significant portion of the curriculum is bilingual. The study of the Welsh language is available to all age groups through nurseries, schools, colleges and universities and in adult education. The study of the language is compulsory for all pupils in State Schools until the age of 16.

University of Glamorgan former university in Wales

The University of Glamorgan was a university based in South Wales prior to the merger with University of Wales, Newport, that formed the University of South Wales in April 2013. The university was based in Pontypridd, in Rhondda Cynon Taf, with campuses in Trefforest, Glyntaff, Merthyr Tydfil, Tyn y Wern and Cardiff. The university had four faculties, and was the only university in Wales which had no link with the University of Wales.

Lampeter town in Wales, United Kingdom

Lampeter is a town, community and electoral ward in Ceredigion, South West Wales, at the confluence of the River Teifi and the Afon Dulas. It is the third largest urban area in Ceredigion, after Aberystwyth and Cardigan, and has a campus of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David.

Cardiff Metropolitan University, formerly University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC), Prifysgol Athrofâu Cymru, Caerdydd (PACC) is a university which is one of three non-Russell group universities located in the city of Cardiff.

A community is a division of land in Wales that forms the lowest tier of local government in Wales. Welsh communities are analogous to civil parishes in England. In 2016 there were 870 communities in Wales.

Cardiff University School of Medicine

The Cardiff University School of Medicine is the medical school of Cardiff University and is located in Cardiff, Wales, UK. Founded in 1893 as part of the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, it is the older of the two medical schools in Wales.

National Eisteddfod of Wales annual festival of Welsh-language culture

The National Eisteddfod of Wales is the most important of several eisteddfodau that are held annually, mostly in Wales. Its eight days of competitions and performances are considered the largest music and poetry festival in Europe. Competitors typically number 6,000 or more, and overall attendance generally exceeds 150,000 visitors. The 2018 Eisteddfod was held in Cardiff Bay with a fence-free 'Maes'.

Coleg Llandrillo is a college in the north of Wales. After its merger in 2012, Grwp Llandrillo Menai became Wales' largest further education institution.

Islam in Wales

Islam is the largest non-Christian faith in Wales, with about 46,000 adherents recorded in the country in the 2011 Census. The earliest recorded connections between Wales and the Muslim world dates back to the early 12th Century. There has been a Somali and Yemeni Islamic community in Cardiff since the mid-19th century, founded by seafarers to Cardiff Docks. The first purpose-built mosque was erected in Cardiff in 1947.

John Viriamu Jones British mathematician and physicist

John Viriamu Jones, FRS, was a Welsh scientist, who worked on measuring the ohm, and an educationalist who was instrumental in establishing the University of Sheffield and Cardiff University.

Swansea Business School Business school part of University of Wales Trinity Saint David

Swansea Business School(SBS) is a public research institution focusing on business studies and is situated in the city of Swansea, Wales, UK. It is based near the High Street at the Swansea Business Campus of the University of Wales Trinity St David and is part of the Faculty of Business and Management. It offers numerous undergraduate courses in Human Resources, Law, Accounting, Business and Finance, Business Management, Leadership, Marketing and Skills for the Workplace.

Sir David Emrys Evans was a Welsh classicist and university principal.

Edward Ernest Hughes was the first professor of history at University College, Swansea.

Bangor University university in Wales, United Kingdom

Bangor University is a university in Bangor, Wales. It received its Royal Charter in 1885 and was one of the founding institutions of the federal University of Wales. Officially known as University College of North Wales (UCNW), and later University of Wales, Bangor (UWB), in 2007 it became Bangor University, independent from the University of Wales.

University of Wales Trinity Saint David public research university based in Wales and London, United Kingdom

The University of Wales Trinity Saint David is a multi-campus university with three main campuses in South West Wales, in Carmarthen, Lampeter and Swansea, a fourth campus in London, England, and learning centres in Cardiff, Wales, and Birmingham, England.

References

  1. "Registrar's Office". Bangor.ac.uk. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  2. "Leighton Andrews: University of Wales 'let Wales down'". BBC News. 22 June 2011.
  3. "University of Wales to stop validating other degrees". BBC News. 3 October 2011.
  4. "University of Wales degree and visa scam exposed by BBC". BBC News. 5 October 2011.
  5. Julie Henry (22 October 2011). "University of Wales abolished after visa scandal". Daily Telegraph.
  6. "Bogus degree scandal prompts calls to wind up University of Wales". Wales Online. 6 October 2011.
  7. University of Wales effectively abolished in merger - BBC News, 21 October 2011
  8. "University of Wales to stop validating other degrees - BBC News". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 4 July 2016.
  9. Jenkins, Ciaran. "University of Wales degree and visa scam exposed by BBC - BBC News". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 4 July 2016.
  10. "Scrap University of Wales call by vice-chancellors - BBC News". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 4 July 2016.
  11. "Warning not to strip University of Wales assets". BBC News. 11 November 2011. Retrieved 17 November 2011.
  12. "Uni merger goes ahead after Met is dissolved". South Wales Evening Post.
  13. "Academic brands Wales' university mergers 'disgraceful'". BBC News . 6 January 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  14. "University of Wales Merger – Frequently Asked Questions" (PDF). University of Wales. January 2018. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
  15. Wales Online (7 June 2012). "University View: Andrew Hawke, managing editor of Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, the University of Wales Dictionary of the Welsh Language".
  16. "UW Press Website".
  17. Abele Adamu Bouba (21 October 2011). "A sense of history and a new beginning". Wales.ac.uk. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  18. 1 2 "Early Days". Aberystwyth University. Retrieved 20 June 2017.
  19. "College by the sea to College on the hill". Aberystwyth University. Retrieved 20 June 2017.
  20. 1 2 3 Blake Welton (12 August 2015). "Your essential new student guide to Bangor University". Daily Post. Trinity Mirror . Retrieved 20 June 2017.
  21. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Sian Collins (29 January 2016). "Cardiff University: a patchwork of predecessors". Cardiff University. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  22. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "History". Cardiff University. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  23. 1 2 "The School of Art: In the Beginning". Cardiff Met 150. Cardiff Metropolitan University. 2015. Archived from the original on 7 July 2015. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  24. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Highs and lows of the University of Wales". BBC News . 5 October 2011.
  25. "History of the University". Archived from the original on 3 November 2012.
  26. 1 2 "Our history". University of South Wales. Retrieved 20 June 2017.
  27. "Welsh college students perform at Buckingham Palace". BBC News . 29 April 2010. The college, based in Cardiff, was founded in 1949 in Cardiff Castle.
  28. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "History and Timeline". University of Wales Trinity Saint David. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  29. 1 2 3 "University's medieval rebel name". BBC News . 15 July 2008. Retrieved 20 June 2017.
  30. Swansea University – What's Happening Archived 28 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  31. "Second uni to award own degrees –". BBC News. 21 November 2008. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  32. "Merger deal signals £13m windfall". Wales Online. 6 January 2007. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  33. "Institution Search – University of Wales". Wales.ac.uk. Archived from the original on 6 May 2012. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  34. "Another worthless validation: the University of Wales and nutritional therapy". dcscience.net.
  35. "BBC TV Wales, part 1". Youtube.
  36. "BBC TV Wales, part 2". Youtube.
  37. "Scandal of the University of Wales and the Quality Assurance Agency". dcscience.net.
  38. "University of Wales to stop validating other degrees". BBC News. 3 October 2011.
  39. Times Higher Education (4 October 2011). "University of Wales pulls in its tentacles".
  40. UW Website (6 October 2011). "University of Wales announces new academic strategy".
  41. "Statue of John Viriamu Jones". National Recording Project. Public Monuments and Sculpture Association. Archived from the original on 1 September 2012. Retrieved 3 July 2017.
  42. Edgar William Jones (1959). "JONES, JOHN VIRIAMU (1856-1901)". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales . Retrieved 4 July 2017.
  43. David Emrys Evans (1959). "REICHEL , Sir HARRY (HENRY RUDOLF) (1856-1931)". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales . Retrieved 4 July 2017.
  44. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Sir Henry Rudolf Reichel (1856–1931)". ArtUK. Retrieved 5 July 2017.
  45. "The University of Wales". North Wales Times. 30 October 1897.
  46. "University Court at Shrewsbury". The Montgomery County Times and Shropshire and Mid-Wales Advertiser. 29 October 1898.
  47. "University of Wales". The Western Mail. 3 November 1899.
  48. "The University of Wales". Towyn-on-Sea and Merioneth County Times. 10 May 1900.
  49. "Welsh University Court". Towyn-on-Sea and Merioneth County Times. 16 May 1901.
  50. "University of Wales". Evening Express. 24 August 1903.
  51. 1 2 "Aberystwyth". Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard. 3 September 1909.
  52. Harold Idris Bell (1959). "JONES, Sir HENRY STUART (1867-1939)". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales . Retrieved 4 July 2017.
  53. 1 2 Edward Lewis Ellis (2001). "REES, Sir JAMES FREDERICK (1883-1967)". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales . Retrieved 4 July 2017.
  54. 1 2 3 Evan David Jones (2001). "EVANS, IFOR (IVOR) LESLIE (1897-1952)". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales . Retrieved 4 July 2017.
  55. Dutton, Jack (27 March 1997). "Obituary: Professor Frank Llewellyn Jones". The Independent. Retrieved 3 July 2017.
  56. Keith Robbins (2015). "SUNDERLAND, ERIC (1930-2010)". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales . Retrieved 4 July 2017.
  57. 'CLEMENT, Prof. (Robert) Marc', Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 3 July 2017

Bibliography

Official histories of the University

Commons-logo.svg Media related to University of Wales at Wikimedia Commons