Unuma-juku

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Keisai Eisen's print of Unuma-juku, part of the series The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaido Kisokaido52 Unuma.jpg
Keisai Eisen's print of Unuma-juku, part of the series The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō

Unuma-juku(鵜沼宿,Unuma-juku) was the fifty-second of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It was also the last post station on the Inagi Kaidō. It is located in the present-day city of Kakamigahara, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The eastern and western portions of the old post town joined together to become a formal post town in 1651. Unuma-juku is approximately six kilometers from the preceding post town, Ōta-juku. [1]

69 Stations of the Nakasendō

The 69 Stations of the Nakasendō are the rest areas along the Nakasendō, which ran from Nihonbashi in Edo to Sanjō Ōhashi in Kyoto. The route stretched approximately 534 km (332 mi) and was an alternate trade route to the Tōkaidō.

Nakasendō

The Nakasendō, also called the Kisokaidō (木曾街道), was one of the five routes of the Edo period, and one of the two that connected Edo to Kyoto in Japan. There were 69 stations (staging-posts) between Edo and Kyoto, crossing through Musashi, Kōzuke, Shinano, Mino and Ōmi provinces. In addition to Tokyo and Kyoto, the Nakasendō runs through the modern-day prefectures of Saitama, Gunma, Nagano, Gifu and Shiga, with a total distance of about 534 km (332 mi).

Kakamigahara, Gifu City in Chūbu, Japan

Kakamigahara is a city located in southern Gifu Prefecture. As of 1 January 2019, the city had an estimated population of 148,225, and a population density of 1700 persons per km2, in 59,736 households. The total area of the city was 87.81 square kilometres (33.90 sq mi).

The old post town contains such historical treasures as Kuan-ji Temple, the ancient tomb of Ishozuka, and haiku-engraved monuments left by Matsuo Bashō. [2]

Haiku (俳句)listen  is a very short form of Japanese poetry in three phrases, typically characterized by three qualities:

  1. The essence of haiku is "cutting" (kiru). This is often represented by the juxtaposition of two images or ideas and a kireji between them, a kind of verbal punctuation mark which signals the moment of separation and colours the manner in which the juxtaposed elements are related.
  2. Traditional haiku often consist of 17 on, in three phrases of 5, 7, and 5 on, respectively.
  3. A kigo, usually drawn from a saijiki, an extensive but defined list of such terms.
Matsuo Bashō Japanese poet

Matsuo Bashō, born 松尾 金作, then Matsuo Chūemon Munefusa, was the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan. During his lifetime, Bashō was recognized for his works in the collaborative haikai no renga form; today, after centuries of commentary, he is recognized as the greatest master of haiku. Matsuo Bashō's poetry is internationally renowned; and, in Japan, many of his poems are reproduced on monuments and traditional sites. Although Bashō is justifiably famous in the West for his hokku, he himself believed his best work lay in leading and participating in renku. He is quoted as saying, "Many of my followers can write hokku as well as I can. Where I show who I really am is in linking haikai verses."

Neighboring Post Towns

Nakasendō
Ōta-juku - Unuma-juku - Kanō-juku
(Shinkanō-juku was an ai no shuku located between Unuma-juku and Kanō-juku.)
Inagi Kaidō
Unuma-juku - Inuyama-juku

Related Research Articles

<i>Honjin</i>

Honjin (本陣) is the Japanese word for an inn for government officials, generally located in post stations (shukuba) during the later part of the Edo period.

Kanō-juku

Kanō-juku was the fifty-third of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located just south of JR Gifu Station in Gifu, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. During the Edo period, it was an independent post town that was approximately 2.3 km (1.4 mi) wide, making it the largest post towns in Mino Province.

Gōdo-juku

Gōdo-juku was the fifty-fourth of the sixty-nine stations (shukuba) of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day city of Gifu, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Gōdo-juku flourished as a post town because it was located next to the Nagara River and there was a ferry service to the other side.

Ōta-juku

Ōta-juku was the fifty-first of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō during the Edo period. It is located in Minokamo, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. It was located on one of the more difficult parts of the Nakasendō, but relics from its days as a post town still remain today. There are tours and programs available to introduce this old post town to visitors, including the Ōta-juku Nakasendō Museum.

Tarui-juku

Tarui-juku was the fifty-seventh of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day town of Tarui, Fuwa District, Gifu Prefecture, Japan.

Akasaka-juku (Nakasendō)

Akasaka-juku was the fifty-sixth of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day city of Ōgaki, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. It flourished during the Edo Period, as it was located in a fertile valley, next to a river.

Sekigahara-juku

Sekigahara-juku was the fifty-eighth of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day town of Sekigahara, Fuwa District, Gifu Prefecture, Japan.

Fushimi-juku (Nakasendō)

Fushimi-juku was the fiftieth of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day town of Mitake, Kani District, Gifu Prefecture, Japan.

Imasu-juku

Imasu-juku was the fifty-ninth of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day town of Sekigahara, Fuwa District, Gifu Prefecture, Japan.

Ōtsu-juku

Ōtsu-juku was the last of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō, as well as the last of the fifty-three stations of the Tōkaidō. It was 14 km (9 mi) from the previous post town, Kusatsu-juku, and was located in Ōmi Province. It is currently located in the present-day city of Ōtsu, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Banba-juku

Banba-juku was the sixty-second of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day city of Maibara, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Toriimoto-juku

Toriimoto-juku was the sixty-third of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the north of Hikone, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Samegai-juku

Samegai-juku was the sixty-first of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day city of Maibara, Shiga Prefecture, Japan.

Musa-juku

Musa-juku was the sixty-sixth of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the city of Ōmihachiman, Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Other kanji used to write "Musa" included 牟佐 and 身狭, but 武佐 became the official kanji in the Edo period. Parts of the old post town still remain today, including the Nakamura-ya, a shop from the Edo period. There are also ruins from the sub-honjin remaining.

Takamiya-juku

Takamiya-juku was the sixty-fourth of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō. It is located in the present-day city of Hikone, Shiga Prefecture, Japan on the right bank of the Inukami River. It stretches from the center of the city out towards the east. It became a post town shortly after its original founding during the Warring States period. Takamiya was the entrance station of Taga-taisha shrine and a big torii exists at the center of Takamiya. Today, Ohmi Railway Taga Line connects Takamiya Station and Taga Taisha-mae Station.

Ai no Shuku were unofficial post stations along historical routes in Japan. These post stations formed organically along routes when the distance between two places was too far or when there were difficult passes nearby. Because they were not officially designated rest areas, travelers along the roads were not allowed to stay in these post stations. Sometimes the Japanese is shortened to 間宿.

<i>The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō</i>

The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō or Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Road, is a series of ukiyo-e works created by Utagawa Hiroshige and Keisai Eisen. There are 71 total prints in the series. The common name for the Kiso Kaidō is "Nakasendō," so this series is sometimes referred to as the Sixty-nine Stations of the Nakasendō. It is a follow up to Hiroshige's The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō and he produced 47 of the prints, with Eisen being responsible for the rest.

Miya-juku

Miya-juku was the forty-first of the fifty-three stations of the Tōkaidō. It is located in former Owari Province in what is now part of the Atsuta-ku section of the city of Nagoya, in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. It was six km from Narumi-juku, the preceding post station.

Shinkanō-juku was a mid-station along the Nakasendō in Edo period Japan. It was in between the post stations of Unuma-juku and Kanō-juku. It is located in the present-day town of Kakamigahara, Gifu Prefecture, Japan.

References

  1. Unuma-juku Juunin Homepage. Unuma-juku Juunin. Accessed July 10, 2007.
  2. Unuma-juku. You Yuu Tokai. Accessed July 10, 2007.

Coordinates: 35°24′16.7″N136°56′12.4″E / 35.404639°N 136.936778°E / 35.404639; 136.936778

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.