Upper Sandusky, Ohio

Last updated
Upper Sandusky, Ohio
Upper Sandusky Ohio.JPG
Downtown Upper Sandusky on North Sandusky Avenue
Motto(s): 
Small town living with big business appeal
OHMap-doton-Upper Sandusky.png
Location of Upper Sandusky, Ohio
Map of Wyandot County Ohio Highlighting Upper Sandusky City.png
Location of Upper Sandusky in Wyandot County
Coordinates: 40°49′47″N83°16′45″W / 40.82972°N 83.27917°W / 40.82972; -83.27917 Coordinates: 40°49′47″N83°16′45″W / 40.82972°N 83.27917°W / 40.82972; -83.27917
Country United States
State Ohio
County Wyandot
Township Crane
Government
  MayorScott Washburn ]] (R)
   City Council
Area
[2]
  Total7.19 sq mi (18.62 km2)
  Land7.01 sq mi (18.16 km2)
  Water0.18 sq mi (0.47 km2)
Elevation
[3]
846 ft (258 m)
Population
 (2010) [4]
  Total6,596
  Estimate 
(2018 [5] )
6,481
  Density940.9/sq mi (363.3/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
43351
Area code(s) 419, 567
FIPS code 39-79044 [6]
GNIS feature ID1065414 [3]
Website http://www.uppersanduskyoh.com/

Upper Sandusky is a city and the county seat of Wyandot County, Ohio, United States, [7] along the upper Sandusky River, which flows north to Sandusky Bay and Lake Erie. The city is approximately 59 mi (96 km) south of Toledo and 62 mi (99 km) north of Columbus. The population was 6,596 at the 2010 census. The city was founded in 1843 and named for an earlier Wyandot Indian village of the same name, which was located nearby. [8] It was named "Upper" because it is located near the headwaters of the Sandusky River; [9]

Contents

History

Upper Sandusky and surrounding villages at the time of the 1782 Sandusky Expedition. Crawford expedition.PNG
Upper Sandusky and surrounding villages at the time of the 1782 Sandusky Expedition.

Upper Sandusky was a 19th-century Wyandot town named for its location at the headwaters of the Sandusky River in northwestern Ohio. [8] This was the primary Wyandot town during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was sometimes also known as Half-King's Town, after Dunquat, the Wyandot "Half-King". The town and the surrounding settlements, like Captain Pipe's Town, were closely allied with the British at Fort Detroit. During the Crawford expedition of 1782, Pennsylvania militiamen sought to destroy the town, but were defeated en route.

After the war, in September 1783, a number of American Indians met at Upper Sandusky and formed the Western Confederacy, a confederation intended to resist U.S. expansion into the Northwest Territory.[ citation needed ] The Northwest Indian War followed.

In the War of 1812, the village became the site of Fort Feree (or Ferree) on a bluff over looking the flood plain of the Sandusky River [10] The Fort was built in late 1812 by Pennsylvania militia led by Lieutenant Colonel Joel Ferree, by order of General William Henry Harrison.

Upper Sandusky became part of the Wyandot Grand Reserve in the Upper Sandusky River area created by the Treaty of Fort Meigs in 1817. Prior to that, it was in northwestern Ohio Indian country above the Greenville Treaty line of 1795. Numerous indigenous Wyandot kept their settlements here until 1842, when they were relocated under the Indian Removal Act of 1830 to what became Wyandotte County, Kansas. A small community of free blacks also settled in the old village.

A new town of Upper Sandusky was platted nearby the abandoned Wyandot village in 1843 and the first house was built in 1845. The first building in town was the county jail in 1846. It was designated as the seat of Wyandot county in 1848.

Geography

Upper Sandusky is located at 40°49′47″N83°16′45″W / 40.82972°N 83.27917°W / 40.82972; -83.27917 (40.829608, -83.279102). [11]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.19 square miles (18.62 km2), of which 7.01 square miles (18.16 km2) is land and 0.18 square miles (0.47 km2) is water. [2]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 754
1860 1,599112.1%
1870 2,56460.4%
1880 3,54038.1%
1890 3,5720.9%
1900 3,355−6.1%
1910 3,77912.6%
1920 3,708−1.9%
1930 3,8894.9%
1940 3,9070.5%
1950 4,39712.5%
1960 4,94112.4%
1970 5,64514.2%
1980 5,9725.8%
1990 5,906−1.1%
2000 6,53310.6%
2010 6,5961.0%
Est. 20186,481 [5] −1.7%
Sources: [6] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18]

2010 census

As of the census [4] of 2010, there were 6,596 people, 2,882 households, and 1,724 families residing in the city. The population density was 940.9 inhabitants per square mile (363.3/km2). There were 3,180 housing units at an average density of 453.6 per square mile (175.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.0% White, 0.3% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 2.6% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.3% of the population.

There were 2,882 households of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.3% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.2% were non-families. 34.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.83.

The median age in the city was 41 years. 22.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.2% were from 25 to 44; 25.3% were from 45 to 64; and 20.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.9% male and 53.1% female.

2000 census

As of the census [6] of 2000, there were 6,533 people, 2,744 households, and 1,682 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,246.2 people per square mile (481.4/km²). There were 2,910 housing units at an average density of 555.1 per square mile (214.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.15% White, 0.18% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.57% Asian, 1.45% from other races, and 0.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.71% of the population.

There were 2,744 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.7% were non-families. 33.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the city, the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 19.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 86.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,613, and the median income for a family was $45,236. Males had a median income of $29,829 versus $22,526 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,484. About 2.7% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.5% of those under age 18 and 3.2% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Upper Sandusky Exempted Village School District operates three elementary schools, one middle school, and Upper Sandusky High School. [19]

The city has a lending library, the Upper Sandusky Community Library. [20]

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Wyandot County, Ohio U.S. county in Ohio

Wyandot County is a county located in northwest Ohio, United States' As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,615. Its county seat is Upper Sandusky. It was named for the Wyandot Indians, who lived here before and after European encounter. Their autonym is variously translated from their language as "around the plains" and "dwellers on the peninsula".

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References

  1. "City Council", City of Upper Sandusky.RetrievedApril 5, 2018.
  2. 1 2 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  3. 1 2 "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  5. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 16, 2019.
  6. 1 2 3 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  8. 1 2 Mangus, Michael; Herman, Jennifer L. (2008). Ohio Encyclopedia. North American Book Dist LLC. p. 560. ISBN   978-1-878592-68-2.
  9. Overman, William Daniel (1958). Ohio Town Names. Akron, OH: Atlantic Press. p. 136.
  10. The local Elks Lodge is built where the stockade stood.
  11. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  12. "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.[ permanent dead link ]
  13. "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  14. "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  15. "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  16. "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.[ permanent dead link ]
  17. "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  18. "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 11 June 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2013.
  19. "Schools". Upper Sandusky Exempted Village School District. Archived from the original on 2018-03-04. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  20. "Wyandot County Public Libraries". Every Library. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  21. "Wyandot County Visitors' Bureau". Wyandot County Visitors' Bureau. Retrieved 1 June 2018.
  22. Evans, Justin (January 24, 2020). "Meet Justin Evans, metro Phoenix's beer bar entrepreneur with big plans for 2020". AZ Central.