Upsilon2 Cancri

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Upsilon2 Cancri
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0        Equinox J2000.0 (ICRS)
Constellation Cancer
Right ascension 08h 33m 00.10385s [1]
Declination +24° 05 05.2560 [1]
Apparent magnitude  (V)+6.35 [2]
Characteristics
Spectral type G9 III [3]
U−B color index +0.88 [2]
B−V color index +1.02 [2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)+73.7±0.5 [4]  km/s
Proper motion (μ)RA: −63.80 [1]   mas/yr
Dec.: −46.40 [1]   mas/yr
Parallax (π)5.1325 ± 0.0407 [5]   mas
Distance 635 ± 5  ly
(195 ± 2  pc)
Absolute magnitude  (MV)+1.13 [3]
Details
Radius 15.43 [5]   R
Luminosity 120 [5]   L
Surface gravity (log g)2.43±0.11 [6]   cgs
Temperature 4881±44 [6]   K
Metallicity [Fe/H]0.00±0.05 [6]   dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i)2.7 [7]  km/s
Other designations
υ2 Cnc, 32 Cancri, BD+24°1946, HD  72324, HIP  41940, HR  3369, SAO  80245 [8]
Database references
SIMBAD data

Upsilon2 Cancri2 Cancri) is a faint, yellow-hued star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It is near the lower brightness limit of stars that can be viewed with the naked eye, having an apparent visual magnitude of +6.35. [2] Based upon an annual parallax shift of 5.1325  mas as seen from our orbit, [1] this system is roughly 635  light years away.

This is an evolved G-type giant star with a stellar classification of G9 III. [3] It is radiating 98 [9] times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of 4,881 K. [6] Upsilon2 Cancri is a member of the Epsilon Indi Moving Group of stars that share a common motion through space. [3]

Related Research Articles

Epsilon Cancri Star in the constellation Cancer

Epsilon Cancri is a white-hued binary star system in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It is the brightest member of the Beehive Cluster with an apparent visual magnitude of +6.29, which is near the lower limit of visibility with the naked eye. The annual parallax shift of 5.3 mas as seen from Earth yields a distance estimate of approximately 616 light-years from the Sun.

Upsilon Serpentis, Latinized from υ Serpentis, is a star in the Serpens Caput section of the constellation Serpens. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 13.04 mas as seen from Earth, it is located around 250 light years from the Sun. The star is bright enough to be faintly visible to the naked eye, having an apparent visual magnitude of +5.70. It is a member of the Hyades group, a stream of stars that share a similar trajectory to the Hyades cluster.

Lambda Cancri is a blue-white hued spectroscopic binary star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. With a combined apparent visual magnitude of +5.93, it is faintly visible to the naked eye. Based upon parallax measurements obtained during the Gaia mission, it is about 550 light-years distant from the Sun.

Mu2 Cancri is a solitary, yellow-hued star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.30. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 42.36 mas as seen from Earth, this star is located 77 light years from the Sun. It is drifting closer with a radial velocity of −36 km/s and will make its closest approach in about 611,100 years when it passes at a distance of 16.8 ly (5.2 pc).

Nu Cancri, Latinized from ν Cancri, is a binary star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It is faintly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.46. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 8.31 mas as seen from the Earth, the star is located roughly 390 light years from the Sun.

Xi Cancri is a spectroscopic binary star system in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.15. Based upon parallax measurements obtained during the Hipparcos mission, it is roughly 370 light-years distant from the Sun.

82 Cancri Star in the constellation Cancer

82 Cancri is a solitary, orange-hued star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It has the Bayer designation Pi2 Cancri, which is Latinized from π2 Cancri; 82 Cancri is the star's Flamsteed designation. The star lies just a degree to the south of the ecliptic. With an apparent visual magnitude of +5.33, it is dimly visible to the naked eye on a dark night. This star is located at a distance of approximately 540 light years from the Sun based on parallax. At that range, the visual magnitude is diminished by an extinction of 0.10 magnitudes due to interstellar dust. It is drifting further away with a radial velocity of +27 km/s.

Sigma2 Cancri, Latinized from σ2 Cancri, is the Bayer designation for a solitary, white-hued star in the constellation Cancer. It is faintly visible to the naked eye, with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.44. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 16.79 mas as seen from Earth, this star is located around 194 light years from the Sun.

Upsilon1 Cancri, Latinized from υ1 Cancri, is the Bayer designation for a solitary, yellow-white hued star in the constellation Cancer. It is faintly visible with the naked eye, having an apparent visual magnitude of +5.7. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 13.05 mas as seen from Earth, this system is roughly 250 light years from the Sun.

Phi1 Cancri, Latinized from φ1 Cancri, is a solitary, orange-hued star in the constellation Cancer. It is faintly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.57. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 8.74 mas, it is approximately 370 light years from the Sun.

36 Cancri is a star in the southern part of the zodiac constellation of Cancer, located around 501 light years away from the Sun. It has the Bayer designation c Cancri; 36 Cancri is the Flamsteed designation. This object is a visible to the naked eye as a faint, white-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 5.92. It is moving further from the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of +16 km/s.

50 Cancri is a single star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer, located 183 light years away from the Sun. It has the Bayer designation A2 Cancri; 50 Cancri is the Flamsteed designation. It is faintly visible to the naked eye as a white-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 5.89. The star is moving away from the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of 23 km/s, having come to within 118 light-years some 1.2 million years ago.

ω2 Cancri is a star in the zodiac constellation Cancer, located around 810 light years away from the Sun. It has the Flamsteed designation 4 Cancri; ω2 Cancri is the Bayer designation, which is Latinised to omega2 Cancri and abbreviated to ω2 Cnc or omega2 Cnc. The star is near the lower limit of visibility to the naked eye, having an apparent visual magnitude of 6.32. It is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −8 km/s. The position of this star near the ecliptic means it is subject to lunar occultations.

Mu1 Cancri, Latinized from μ1 Cancri, is a variable star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. The name Mu1 comes from the Bayer naming system: the "1" in the name is because (from Earth) it appears to be close to 10 Cancri, or Mu2 Cancri. It is also known by the variable star designation BL Cancri. The star is dimly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude that ranges from 5.87 down to 6.07. Parallax measurements put it about 630 light-years (192 parsecs) from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude is diminished by an extinction factor of 0.28. The position of the star near the ecliptic means it is subject to lunar occultations.

28 Cancri is a star system in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It is a variable star with the designation CX Cancri, and is close to the lower limit of visibility with the naked eye, having a mean apparent visual magnitude of 6.05. The annual parallax shift seen from Earth's orbit is 7.32 mas, which provides a distance estimate of about 450 light years. It is moving away from the Sun with a radial velocity of around +9 km/s.

34 Cancri is a star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer, located about 568 light years away from the Sun. It is a challenge to view with the naked even under good viewing conditions, having an apparent visual magnitude of 6.48. At the distance of this star, its visual magnitude is diminished by an extinction of 0.14 due to interstellar dust.

μ Mensae, Latinized as Mu Mensae, is a solitary, blue-white hued star in the southern constellation of Mensa. With an apparent visual magnitude of 5.54, it is just bright enough to be faintly visible to the naked eye. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 6.8405 mas as seen from GAIA, this star is located roughly 477 light years from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude is diminished by an extinction factor of 0.09 due to interstellar dust.

Eta Reticuli Star in the constellation Reticulum

Eta Reticuli is a solitary star in the southern constellation of Reticulum. With an apparent visual magnitude of 5.22, it is faintly visible to the naked eye on a dark night. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 8.48 mas, it is located at a distance of roughly 385 light years from the Sun. It may be a member of the high-velocity Zeta Herculis Moving Group of stars that share a common motion through space.

Upsilon³ Eridani, officially named Beemim, is a star in the constellation of Eridanus. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 3.96 The distance to this star, based upon an annual parallax shift of 11.01 mas, is around 296 light-years.

Upsilon Coronae Borealis, Latinized from υ Coronae Borealis, is a solitary star in the northern constellation of Corona Borealis. It is a white-hued star that is dimly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 5.78. The distance to this object is approximately 630 light-years based on parallax.

References

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