Upsilon Aquilae

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Upsilon Aquilae
Aquila IAU.svg
Cercle rouge 100%25.svg
Location of υ Aquilae (circled)
Observation data
Epoch J2000       Equinox J2000
Constellation Aquila
Right ascension 19h 45m 39.94763s [1]
Declination +07° 36 47.3717 [1]
Apparent magnitude  (V)+5.889 [2]
Characteristics
Spectral type A3 IV [3]
U−B color index +0.09 [4]
B−V color index +0.18 [4]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)–29.9 [5]  km/s
Proper motion (μ)RA: +54.10 [1]   mas/yr
Dec.: +0.50 [1]   mas/yr
Parallax (π)18.65 ± 0.41 [1]   mas
Distance 175 ± 4  ly
(54 ± 1  pc)
Absolute magnitude  (MV)+2.24 [6]
Details
Luminosity 10.5 [6]   L
Surface gravity (log g)4.21 [2]   cgs
Temperature 7,906 [2]   K
Metallicity [Fe/H]–0.05 [2]   dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i)42 [7]  km/s
Other designations
υ Aql, 49 Aquilae, BD+07° 4210, HD 186689, HIP 97229, HR 7519, SAO 125032. [8]
Database references
SIMBAD data

Upsilon Aquilae, Latinized from υ Aquilae, is the Bayer designation for a star in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. With an apparent visual magnitude of +5.91 [4] it is a faint star but visible to the naked eye from suburban skies. It has an annual parallax shift of 18.65  milliarcsecond, [1] indicating a distance of around 175 light-years (54 parsecs ).

Upsilon Aquilae is a subgiant star with a stellar classification of A3 IV. [3] The outer atmosphere is radiating energy into space with 10.5 [6] times the Sun's luminosity at an effective temperature of 7,906 K, [2] which gives it the white-hot glow of an A-type star. It is spinning relatively quickly with a projected rotational velocity of 42 km/s. [7]

Related Research Articles

Pi<sup>4</sup> Orionis Binary star in the constellation Orion

Pi4 Orionis4 Ori, π4 Orionis) is a binary star system in the western part of the Orion constellation. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 3.7. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 3.1 mass, it is located roughly 1,050 light years from the Sun.

Pi Serpentis, Latinized from π Serpentis, is a solitary white-hued star in the constellation Serpens, located in its head, Serpens Caput. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 18.22 mas as seen from Earth, it is located around 179 light years from the Sun. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.82.

Upsilon Serpentis, Latinized from υ Serpentis, is a star in the Serpens Caput section of the constellation Serpens. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 13.04 mas as seen from Earth, it is located around 250 light years from the Sun. The star is bright enough to be faintly visible to the naked eye, having an apparent visual magnitude of +5.70. It is a member of the Hyades group, a stream of stars that share a similar trajectory to the Hyades cluster.

Epsilon Trianguli Binary star in the constellation Triangulum

Epsilon Trianguli, Latinized from ε Trianguli, is a binary star system in the northern constellation of Triangulum. Based upon measurement of its trigonometric parallax, it is approximately 390 light years from Earth.

Psi<sup>3</sup> Aquarii Binary star in the constellation Aquarius

Psi3 Aquarii, Latinized from ψ3 Aquarii, is the Bayer designation for a visual binary star system in the constellation of Aquarius. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 4.98, which is bright enough to be seen with the naked eye. Parallax measurements give a distance estimate of roughly 262 light-years.

Lambda Aquilae Star in the constellation Aquila

Lambda Aquilae, Latinized from λ Aquilae, is a star in the constellation Aquila. It has the traditional name Al Thalimain, which it shares with ι Aquilae. The name is derived from the Arabic الظلیمينal-ẓalīmayn "the two ostriches". Lambda Aquilae is more precisely Al Thalimain Prior. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 3.43, which is bright enough to be seen with the naked eye. Parallax measurements place it at a distance of about 125 light-years from Earth.

Rho Aquilae Star in the constellation Delphinus

Rho Aquilae, ρ Aquilae, is the Bayer designation for a star in the northern constellation of Delphinus. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 4.94 and is bright enough to be seen with the naked eye in good conditions.

Phi Aquilae Star in the constellation Aquila

Phi Aquilae, Latinized from φ Aquilae, is the Bayer designation of a binary star system in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. It has an apparent visual magnitude of +5.28 and is visible to the naked eye. With an annual parallax shift of 14.86 mas, this star is located at a distance of approximately 219 light-years from Earth.

Lambda Arietis

Lambda Arietis is the Bayer designation for a double star in the northern constellation of Aries. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 25.32 arcseconds, this system is approximately 129 light-years distant from Earth. The pair have a combined apparent visual magnitude of 4.79, which is bright enough to be viewed with the naked eye. Because the yellow secondary is nearly three magnitudes fainter than the white primary, they are a challenge to split with quality 7× binoculars and are readily resolvable at 10×.

Omicron Arietis, Latinized from ο Arietis, is the Bayer designation for a single, blue-white hued star in the northern constellation of Aries. It has an apparent visual magnitude of +5.78, which means it is dimly visible to the naked eye. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 5.49 mas as seen from Earth, it is located roughly 590 light years from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude of the star is diminished by an extinction factor of 0.22 due to interstellar dust.

18 Aquarii is a single, yellow-white hued star in the equatorial constellation of Aquarius. The designation is from the catalogue of English astronomer John Flamsteed, first published in 1712. The star is faintly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 5.49 and is located about 154 light-years from Earth.

14 Aquilae is a probable spectroscopic binary star system in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. 14 Aquilae is the Flamsteed designation though it also bears the Bayer designation g Aquilae. It is visible to the naked eye as a dim, white-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 5.42, and it is located at a distance of approximately 500 light-years from Sun. The star is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −39 km/s, and may come as close as 136 light-years in around 3.5 million years.

28 Aquilae, abbreviated 28 Aql, is a star in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. 28 Aquilae is its Flamsteed designation though it also bears the Bayer designation A Aquilae. It has an apparent visual magnitude is 5.5, making this a faint star that requires dark suburban skies to view. The annual parallax shift of 9.67 mas means this star is located at a distance of approximately 340 light-years from Earth.

35 Aquilae Star in the constellation Aquila

35 Aquilae is a star in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. 35 Aquilae is its Flamsteed designation though it also bears the Bayer designation c Aquilae. The apparent visual magnitude of this star is 5.8, which means it is a faint star but visible to the naked eye from dark suburban or rural skies. It has an annual parallax shift of 16.34 mas that is caused by the Earth's orbit around the Sun. This yields a distance estimate of 200 light-years, give or take a 4 light-year margin of error. At this distance, the visual magnitude is diminished by 0.26 from extinction caused by interstellar gas and dust.

68 Aquilae is a double star in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. 68 Aquilae is its Flamsteed designation. Its apparent magnitude is 6.12.

Rho2 Cephei, Latinized from ρ2 Cephei, or simply ρ Cephei, is a solitary star in the northern constellation of Cepheus. With an apparent visual magnitude of 5.50, it is faintly visible to the naked eye, forming an optical pair with Rho1 Cephei. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 13.31 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located about 245 light years from the Sun.

Omega<sup>1</sup> Aquarii Star in the constellation Aquarius

Omega1 Aquarii, Latinized from ω1 Aquarii, is the Bayer designation for a star in the equatorial constellation of Aquarius. With an apparent visual magnitude of 4.96, this star is visible to the naked eye from the suburbs. The distance to this star can be estimated from the parallax as roughly 142 light-years, with a 5% margin of error.

54 Ceti

54 Ceti is an older Flamsteed designation for a star that is now located within the constellation boundaries of Aries, the Ram. In the present day it is known by star catalogue identifiers like HD 11257 or HR 534. At an apparent visual magnitude of 5.94, it can be seen with the naked eye. The distance to this star, as determined using parallax measurements made during the Hipparcos mission, is approximately 139 light-years, give or take a 6 light-year margin of error. It is located near the ecliptic and hence is subject to occasional occultation by the Moon.

Omega<sup>2</sup> Aquilae Star in the constellation Aquila

Omega2 Aquilae, Latinized from ω2 Aquilae, is the Bayer designation for a star in the equatorial constellation of Aquila, the eagle. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 6.0, which is close to the lower limit of detectability with the naked eye. According to the Bortle Dark-Sky Scale, this star can be viewed from dark rural skies. As the Earth orbits about the Sun, this star undergoes a parallax shift of 11.7 mas. This is equivalent to a physical distance of 279 light-years from Earth, give or take a 2 light year margin of error. The star is drifting closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −26 km/s.

υ Gruis, Latinised as Upsilon Gruis, is a double star in the southern constellation of Grus. The apparent magnitude is 5.61, which is bright enough to be viewed with the naked eye. Located around 87 parsecs (280 ly) distant, the white-hued primary is an A-type main-sequence star of spectral type A1V, a star that is currently fusing its core hydrogen. it is spinning rapidly with a projected rotational velocity of 320 km/s. The companion is a magnitude 8.24 star at an angular separation of 0.90″ from the primary along a position angle of 205°, as of 2009.

References

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  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Soubiran, C.; et al. (June 2010), "The PASTEL catalogue of stellar parameters", Astronomy and Astrophysics, 515: A111, arXiv: 1004.1069 , Bibcode:2010A&A...515A.111S, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201014247.
  3. 1 2 Cowley, A.; et al. (April 1969), "A study of the bright A stars. I. A catalogue of spectral classifications", Astronomical Journal, 74: 375–406, Bibcode:1969AJ.....74..375C, doi:10.1086/110819.
  4. 1 2 3 Johnson, H. L.; et al. (1966), "UBVRIJKL photometry of the bright stars", Communications of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 4 (99): 99, Bibcode:1966CoLPL...4...99J.
  5. Wilson, Ralph Elmer (1953), "General catalogue of stellar radial velocities", Washington, Carnegie Institution of Washington: 0, Bibcode:1953GCRV..C......0W.
  6. 1 2 3 Anderson, E.; Francis, Ch. (2012), "XHIP: An extended hipparcos compilation", Astronomy Letters, 38 (5): 331, arXiv: 1108.4971 , Bibcode:2012AstL...38..331A, doi:10.1134/S1063773712050015.
  7. 1 2 Royer, F.; Zorec, J.; Gómez, A. E. (February 2007), "Rotational velocities of A-type stars. III. Velocity distributions", Astronomy and Astrophysics, 463 (2): 671–682, arXiv: astro-ph/0610785 , Bibcode:2007A&A...463..671R, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20065224.
  8. "* ups Aql". SIMBAD . Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg . Retrieved 2012-07-21.