Venues of the 1992 Winter Olympics

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Olympic rings.svg 1992 Winter Olympics

For the 1992 Winter Olympics in Albertville, France, a total of thirteen sports venues were used. Val-d'Isère has been part of the Alpine Skiing World Cup since the late 1960s while Tignes served as host of the first Freestyle World Ski Championships in 1986. Most of the venues used were constructed between 1987 and mid 1990 with the test events taking place in late 1990 and early 1991. It was the last Winter Olympics with an outdoor speed skating rink which led to weather issues for three of the ten events. Three cross-country skiing events were run in snowstorms while the men's 20 km biathlon was found to be 0.563 km (0.350 mi) too short. The downhill events in alpine skiing were criticized for being too steep. Freestyle skiing made its official debut at these games with the men's winner being stormed after his win while the women's winner won her event in a snow storm. La Plagne hosted the skeleton World Championships in 1993 while Val-d'Isère hosted the Alpine World Ski Championships in 2009.

Contents

Venues

VenueSportsCapacityRef.
L'anneau de vitesse Speed skating 10,000 [1]
La halle de glace Olympique Figure skating, Short track speed skating 9,000 [2]
La Plagne Bobsleigh, Luge Not listed. [3]
Les Arcs Speed skiing (demonstration)Not listed. [4]
Les Menuires Alpine skiing (men's slalom)Not listed. [5]
Les Saisies Biathlon, Cross-country skiing 12,500 [6]
Méribel Alpine skiing (women)3,000 [7]
Méribel Ice Palace Ice hockey 6,420 [7]
Patinoire olympique de Pralognan-la-Vanoise Curling (demonstration)2,300 [8]
Théâtre des Cérémonies Ceremonies (opening/ closing)35,000 [1]
Tignes Freestyle skiing Not listed. [9]
Tremplin du Praz Nordic combined, Ski jumping 20,000 (jumping)
15,000 (Nordic combined - cross-country skiing)
[10]
Val-d'Isère Alpine skiing (men's downhill, super-giant slalom, giant slalom, and combined)Not listed. [11]

Before the Olympics

Albertville is part of the Rhône-Alpes region in France that had hosted the Winter Olympics twice with Chamonix in 1924 and Grenoble in 1968. [12] [13] Jean-Claude Killy, the triple gold medalist in the men's alpine skiing event at the 1968 Grenoble Games, had become a successful businessman when he suggested the idea of the 1992 Winter Olympics in December 1981 to Michel Barnier, a politician in the Savoie department. [13] A proposal was sent to the Albertville town council six months later, followed regional studies done during 1983-5. [13] Presentation and media operations for the bid took place from 1983 to its awarding in 1986 by the International Olympic Committee. [13] After five rounds of voting, Albertville was selected 51-25-9 over Sofia, Bulgaria & Falun, Sweden. [13]

Val-d'Isère had its first alpine skiing World Cup events run in December 1968. [14] The Olympic test held there in December 1990 was won by 1980 Winter Olympics men's downhill gold medalist Leonhard Stock of Austria. [15]

Tignes hosted of the first FIS Freestyle World Ski Championships in February 1986. [16]

Construction on most of the venues took place between 1987 and mid 1990 in time for the late 1990 and early 1991 test events. [17]

During the Olympics

This was the last Winter Olympics in which speed skating was held outdoors. [18] As a result, weather played a factor in three of the ten events run. In the women's 500 m on 10 February, the start of the event was delayed one hour the let the outdoor oval ice harden. [19] Warm weather delayed the women's 1,500 m event for an hour on the 12th. [20] The following day, the men's 5,000 m event was held in a steady rain. [21] Norway's Geir Karlstad, the gold medalist in the men's 5000 m, commented in the post race press conference that "I didn't like soft ice up to now, but now I do". [21] This led to the International Skating Union passing a rule after the 1992 Winter Games stating that all Olympic speed skating competitions should be held indoors which it has been since the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer. [18]

For the alpine skiing downhill courses, complaints were given that the courses were too steep. [22] On the men's side, the complaints from downhill skiers that it was more like a super giant slalom course rather than a classical downhill course. [22] The women's course was 2.77 km (1.72 mi) long and had the steepest vertical drop ever at 828 m (2,717 ft). [22] Further making the women's downhill a challenge was an impending snowstorm that forced race officials to move up the start time and send the skiers out at shorter-than-usual intervals. [22] An intermittent fog also set in during the women's downhill. [22]

Cross-country skiing had snowstorm in the men's 10 km, men's 10 km + 15 km combined pursuit, and women's 5 km events. [23] Meanwhile, the course of the biathlon men's 20 km individual event was found to be 0.563 km (0.350 mi) too short. [24]

The men's freestyle skiing event had France's Edgar Grospiron as its winner. [25] Grospiron's fan broke through the security fence that lined the course to embrace the champion and hoist Grospiron on their shoulders. [25] Meanwhile, the women's event was won by Donna Weinbrecht of the United States while skiing to an accompaniment of The Ramones' "Rock 'n' Roll High School" in a snowstorm. [26]

After the Olympics

La Plagne hosted the skeleton part of the FIBT World Championships in 1993. [27] The venue was part of Annecy's unsuccessful bid for the 2018 Winter Olympics in July 2011. If selected, La Plagne would have hosted the bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton events. [28]

Val-d'Isère hosted the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships in 2009. [29] The venue continues to host be a host of the annual FIS Alpine Ski World Cup. [30]

The speed skating venue was converted into an athletics and football venue after the Olympics. Olympic Hall is in use for ice hockey and figure skating as of 2010. [31] The ceremonial stadium was removed following the 1992 Winter Olympics though the monument that was at the ceremony remains as of 2010.

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For the 1960 Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley, California, in the United States, a total of five sports venues were used. Except for the Squaw Valley ski resort, all of the venues had to be constructed. For the first time in Winter Olympic history, a temporary venue was constructed at McKinney Creek for biathlon, cross-country skiing, and Nordic combined. A bobsleigh track was not constructed over the guarantees from the FIBT not being able to field the minimum twelve teams needed to compete, making it the only time bobsleigh has not been included in the Winter Olympics.

For the 1964 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, a total of eight sports venues were used. Luge made its debut at these games, but were marred by the death of a British slider two weeks prior to the Games. A second ski jumping event debuted and the best two out of three jumps were used in both events for the only time in the history of the Winter Olympics. All eight venues would be used again when the Winter Games returned to Innsbruck twelve years later though the venues would undergo renovations in time for the 1976 Games.

For the 1968 Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France, a total of ten sports venues were used. Most venues were constructed between the 1964 Winter Games in Innsbruck and the 1968 Games. Thawing was an issue for the four-man bobsleigh run. They were limited to only two runs. Thawing also affected the men's 500 m speed skating event. Electronic timing in alpine skiing affected the results of the women's giant slalom event. It gave Canada's Nancy Greene a headache for two days despite her gold medal in the event.

For the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan, a total of twelve sports venues were used. A thirteenth venue which was a reserved luge course was constructed, but never used in actual competition. Construction on all but of the venues used took place between 1968 and early 1971 in time for the test events. The Tsuskisamu Indoor Skating Rink was not completed until late 1971 or early 1972 because the number of teams scheduled to compete at the 1972 Games was not known. At the actual luge venue used, a malfunctioning starting gate during the first run led to the results being cancelled and rerun being ordered. The results of this event led to the only tie in Olympic luge history. The ski jumps at Miyanomori and Okurayama served as host venues for the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships thirty-five years later.

Venues of the 1976 Winter Olympics Wikimedia list article

For the 1976 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, a total of eight sports venues were used. The games were originally awarded to Denver, Colorado in the United States in 1970, but they withdrew in the wake of Colorado residents voting against it for environmental and cost reasons in November 1972. This led to the International Olympic Committee opening up the bids for the games again, eventually awarding them to Innsbruck in February 1973. The Austrian city, having hosted the Winter Olympics in 1964, was in the process of having the venues used for those Games before Denver's with clear cutting of the alpine skiing venues, lessening of the amount of cross-country skiing routes, upgrading the ski jumps, adding lighting in the indoor sports arena to accommodate color television, and the construction of a combination bobsleigh and luge track. After the 1976 Games, the venues have remained in use, hosting events in Nordic skiing and the sliding sports. They hosted some of the events for the Winter Universiade in 2005 and seven of the eight venues served as host for the first Winter Youth Olympic Games in 2012.

Venues of the 1980 Winter Olympics Wikimedia list article

For the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, United States, a total of seven sports venues were used. All five of the venues used for the 1932 Winter Olympics were also used at the 1980 Winter Games with adjustments. These adjustments included electronic scoreboards, increased refrigeration, and the addition of a separate luge track. This was the last Winter Olympics where there were separate bobsleigh and luge tracks. The closest finish in Olympic history in cross-country skiing led skiing officials to time future events in hundredths of a second rather than tenths of a second. This would also apply to biathlon events. Eric Heiden of the United States won five gold medals at the speed skating oval while the "Miracle on Ice" took place between Americans and Soviets at the Olympic Center. In the late 1990s, the luge track was demolished and a new combination track was constructed in time for the only Winter Goodwill Games held. The sliding venue was named to the American National Register of Historical Places in February 2010.

For the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, a total of nine sports venues were used. The idea for the Games came around from a 1968 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development study on promoting winter tourism in Yugoslavia. After Sarajevo was awarded the 1984 Games in 1978, venue construction and renovation took place between 1979 and 1983. Weather postponed the men's downhill alpine skiing event three times before it was finally run. The men's cross-country skiing 30 km event was run during a blizzard. After the games, all but one of the venues were damaged during the Bosnian War and the Siege of Sarajevo. After the war, Zetra Ice Hall was rebuilt and is in use as of 2010.

Venues of the 1988 Winter Olympics Wikimedia list article

For the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, a total of nine sports venues were used. Calgary tried twice to host the Winter Olympics in the 1960s without success before finally winning the 1988 Winter Games in 1981. Stampede Corral was built in 1950 while McMahon Stadium was built in 1960. When the National Hockey League (NHL) Flames franchise was relocated from Atlanta, Georgia in the United States during the summer of 1980, a new arena was needed. The Saddledome construction was underway in late 1981 when Calgary was awarded the 1988 Games. Completed in 1983, the Olympic Saddledome has played host to the Flames ever since, including three Stanley Cup Finals and the NHL All-Star Game in 1985. An innovation for the games was the first indoor long-track speed skating venue which has served as a model for future Olympics. The bobsleigh and luge track was the first combination track in North America and was noted for the Jamaican bobsleigh team crash during the four-man event. Both the Oval and the bobsleigh/luge track continue to host the World Championships in their respective sports since the 1988 Winter Olympics.

Venues of the 1998 Winter Olympics Wikimedia list article

For the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, a total of fifteen sports venues were used. Nagano had attempted twice to host the Winter Olympics, losing out to Sapporo, host of the 1972 Winter Olympics. The third time, in 1991, Nagano edged out Salt Lake City to host the 1998 Games. The biathlon venue was adjusted in accordance with the Washington Convention over endangered species. The biggest venue controversy was at Happo'one resort on the length of the men's downhill and the battle that ensued to the point where skiing officials threatened to pull the event entirely before a compromise was reached three months before the Olympics. M-Wave has hosted three World Speed Skating Championships since the Olympics while the Spiral has hosted a couple of World championships in bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton.

Venues of the 2006 Winter Olympics Wikimedia list article

For the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, a total of fifteen sports venues were used. Venue construction ran from 2002 to 2005. Cesana Pariol had to have turns 17 and 18 modified following the Luge World Cup in January 2005, but they were not cleared out until October 2005. Winds postponed the Nordic combined team event for a day. Many of the venues served as host for the Winter Universidade the following year.

References

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  2. 1992 Winter Olympics official report. pp. 83, 87. Accessed 5 December 2010. (in English and French)
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  11. 1992 Winter Olympics official report. pp. 114-7. Accessed 5 December 2010. (in English and French)
  12. Rhone Alpes tourism website. Accessed 5 December 2010. (in Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish), & (Taiwanese)
  13. 1 2 3 4 5 1992 Winter Olympics official report. pp. 12-27. Accessed 5 December 2010. (in English and French)
  14. FIS-ski.com Alpine Skiing World Cup Val-d'Isere 11-12 December 1968 podium results. Accessed 5 December 2010.
  15. FIS-Ski.com Alpine skiing World Cup Val-d'Isere 8 December 1990 men's downhill results. Accessed 5 December 2010.
  16. FIS-ski.com Freestyle World Ski Championships Tignes 2-6 February 1986 results. Archived 2 January 2013 at Archive.today Accessed 5 December 2010.
  17. 1992 Winter Olympics official report. Accessed 5 December 2010. pp. 78-81, 314-7. (in English and French)
  18. 1 2 Sports-reference.com 1992 Winter Olympics speed skating overview. Accessed 5 December 2010.
  19. Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Speed Skating, Women: 500 Meters". In The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. pp. 122-3.
  20. Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Speed Skating, Women: 1500 Meters". In The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 129.
  21. 1 2 Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2009). "Speed Skating, Men: 5000 Meters". In The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited.
  22. 1 2 3 4 5 Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2009). The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. pp. 188-9, 201-2.
  23. Wallechinsky, David & Jaime Loucky (2009). The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics. London:Aurum Press Limited. pp. 230, 241, 256.
  24. Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2009). "Biathlon, Men: 20 Kilometers". In The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 286.
  25. 1 2 Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2009). "Freestyle Skiing, Men: Moguls". In The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 301.
  26. Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2009). "Freestyle Skiing, Women: Moguls". In The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 304.
  27. FIBT.com World and Olympic champions in men's skeleton: 1928-2007. Accessed 5 December 2010 (Source has 1993 listed as Albertville.).
  28. Annecy2018.com map of the proposed venues. Archived 2011-07-07 at the Wayback Machine Accessed 5 December 2010. (in English and French)
  29. FIS-ski.com Alpine World Ski Championships Val-d'Isere 3-15 February 2009 results. Accessed 5 December 2010.
  30. FISApline.com profile of the FIS Alpine Ski World Cup. Accessed 5 December 2010.
  31. Halle Olympique de Albertville official website. Accessed 5 December 2010. (in French)