Vernon K. Irvine

Last updated
Vernon K. Irvine
Biographical details
Born(1871-06-24)June 24, 1871
Bedford, Pennsylvania
DiedSeptember 4, 1942(1942-09-04) (aged 71)
St. Petersburg, Florida
Alma mater Princeton University (1895)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1894 North Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall6–3

Vernon Kremer Irvine (June 24, 1871 – September 4, 1942) was an American football coach and educator. He served as the head football coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for on season, in 1894, compiling a record of 6–3. Irvine was born one June 24, 1871 in Bedford, Pennsylvania. [1] He attended Phillips Exeter Academy, where played football as an end, and Princeton University, where he was captain of the "scrub" football team. [2] [3] Irvine was the principal of Butler High School in Butler, Pennsylvania for 36 years, until his retirement in 1934 due to poor health. He moved to St. Petersburg, Florida, where he died September 4, 1942. [4]

Contents

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
North Carolina Tar Heels (Independent)(1894)
1894 North Carolina 6–3
North Carolina:6–3
Total:6–3

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References

  1. "Full text of "The class of 1895"". www30.us.archive.org. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  2. "Foot Ball Coach Arrived". The Daily Tar Heel . Chapel Hill, North Carolina. October 4, 1894. p. 2. Retrieved September 16, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  3. "Retired Educator Succumbs Here". St. Petersburg Times . St. Petersburg, Florida. September 5, 1942. p. 5. Retrieved September 16, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .