Vernor Vinge

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Vernor Vinge
Vernor Vinge.jpg
BornVernor Steffen Vinge
(1944-10-02) October 2, 1944 (age 74)
Waukesha, Wisconsin, US
Occupation Computer scientist
Nationality American
Period1966–present
Genre Science fiction
Notable works True Names (1981),
A Fire Upon the Deep (1992),
"The Coming Technological Singularity" (1993),
Fast Times at Fairmont High (2002)
Notable awards Hugo Awards,
  Best Novel: 1993, 2000, 2007;
  Best Novella: 2003, 2005
Prometheus Awards:
  1987, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2014 Special Award for Lifetime Achievement
Spouse Joan D. Vinge (1972–1979, divorced)

Vernor Steffen Vinge ( /ˈvɜːrnərˈvɪn/ ( Loudspeaker.svg listen ); born October 2, 1944) is an American science fiction author and retired professor. He taught mathematics and computer science at San Diego State University. He is the originator of the technological singularity concept and perhaps the first to present a fictional "cyberspace".[ citation needed ] He has won the Hugo Award for his novels and novellas A Fire Upon the Deep (1992), A Deepness in the Sky (1999), Rainbows End (2006), Fast Times at Fairmont High (2002), and The Cookie Monster (2004).

Computer science Study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation

Computer science is the study of processes that interact with data and that can be represented as data in the form of programs. It enables the use of algorithms to manipulate, store, and communicate digital information. A computer scientist studies the theory of computation and the practice of designing software systems.

San Diego State University public research university in San Diego, USA

San Diego State University (SDSU) is a public research university in San Diego, California. Founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School, it is the third-oldest university in the 23-member California State University (CSU). SDSU has a Fall 2016 student body of 34,688 and an alumni base of more than 280,000.

The technological singularity is the hypothesis that the invention of artificial superintelligence (ASI) will abruptly trigger runaway technological growth, resulting in unfathomable changes to human civilization.

Contents

Life and work

Vinge published his first short story, "Bookworm, Run!", in the March 1966 issue of Analog Science Fiction , then edited by John W. Campbell. The story explores the theme of artificially augmented intelligence by connecting the brain directly to computerised data sources. He became a moderately prolific contributor to SF magazines in the 1960s and early 1970s. In 1969, he expanded the story "Grimm's Story" ( Orbit 4 , 1968) into his first novel, Grimm's World . His second novel, The Witling , was published in 1976. [1]

"Bookworm, Run!" is a science fiction short story by American wrtier Vernor Vinge. His second published work of fiction, it appeared in Analog Science Fiction Science Fact in 1966, and was reprinted in True Names... and Other Dangers in 1987, and in 2001's The Collected Stories of Vernor Vinge.

John W. Campbell American science fiction writer and editor

John Wood Campbell Jr. was an American science fiction writer and editor. He was editor of Astounding Science Fiction from late 1937 until his death and was part of the Golden Age of Science Fiction. Campbell wrote super-science space opera under his own name and stories under his primary pseudonym, Don A. Stuart. Campbell also used the pen names Karl Van Kampen and Arthur McCann. His novella Who Goes There? was adapted as the films The Thing from Another World (1951), The Thing (1982), and The Thing (2011).

Orbit was an American long-running series of anthologies of new fiction edited by Damon Knight, often featuring work by such writers as Gene Wolfe, Joanna Russ, R. A. Lafferty, and Kate Wilhelm, who was married to Knight. The anthologies tended toward the avant-garde edge of science fiction, but by no means exclusively; occasionally the volumes would feature some nonfiction critical writing or humorous anecdotes by Knight. Inspired by Frederik Pohl's Star Science Fiction series, and in its turn an influence on Harlan Ellison's Dangerous Visions volumes and many others, it ran for over a decade and twenty-one volumes, not including a "Best-of" collection which covered the years 1966-1976.

Vinge came to prominence in 1981 with his novella True Names , perhaps the first story to present a fully fleshed-out concept of cyberspace, [2] which would later be central to cyberpunk stories by William Gibson, Neal Stephenson and others. His next two novels, The Peace War (1984) and Marooned in Realtime (1986), explore the spread of a future libertarian society, and deal with the impact of a technology which can create impenetrable force fields called 'bobbles'. These books built Vinge's reputation as an author who would explore ideas to their logical conclusions in particularly inventive ways. Both books were nominated for the Hugo Award, but lost to novels by William Gibson and Orson Scott Card. [3] [4]

<i>True Names</i> novella by Vernor Vinge

True Names is a 1981 science fiction novella by American writer Vernor Vinge, a seminal work of the cyberpunk genre. It is one of the earliest stories to present a fully fleshed-out concept of cyberspace, which would later be central to cyberpunk. The story also contains elements of transhumanism, anarchism, and even hints about The Singularity.

Cyberspace notional environment in which communication over computer networks occurs

Cyberspace is widespread, interconnected digital technology. The term entered the popular culture from science fiction and the arts but is now used by technology strategists, security professionals, government, military and industry leaders and entrepreneurs to describe the domain of the global technology environment. Others consider cyberspace to be just a notional environment in which communication over computer networks occurs. The word became popular in the 1990s when the uses of the Internet, networking, and digital communication were all growing dramatically and the term "cyberspace" was able to represent the many new ideas and phenomena that were emerging. It has been called the largest unregulated and uncontrolled domain in the history of mankind, and is also unique because it is a domain created by people vice the traditional physical domains.

Cyberpunk is a subgenre of science fiction in a futuristic setting that tends to focus on a "combination of lowlife and high tech" featuring advanced technological and scientific achievements, such as artificial intelligence and cybernetics, juxtaposed with a degree of breakdown or radical change in the social order.

Vinge won the Hugo Award (tying for Best Novel with Doomsday Book by Connie Willis) with his 1992 novel, A Fire Upon the Deep . [5] A Deepness in the Sky (1999) was a prequel to Fire, following competing groups of humans in The Slow Zone as they struggle over who has the rights to exploit a technologically emerging alien culture. Deepness won the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 2000. [6]

<i>Doomsday Book</i> (novel) novel by Connie Willis

Doomsday Book is a 1992 science fiction novel by American author Connie Willis. The novel won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards, and was shortlisted for other awards. The title of the book refers to the Domesday Book of 1086; Kivrin, the main character, says that her recording is "a record of life in the Middle Ages, which is what William the Conqueror's survey turned out to be."

Connie Willis American science fiction writer

Constance Elaine Trimmer Willis, commonly known as Connie Willis, is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. She has won eleven Hugo Awards and seven Nebula Awards for particular works—more major awards than any other writer—most recently the "Best Novel" Hugo and Nebula Awards for Blackout/All Clear (2010). She was inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2009 and the Science Fiction Writers of America named her its 28th SFWA Grand Master in 2011.

<i>A Fire Upon the Deep</i> 1992 science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge

A Fire Upon the Deep is a 1992 science fiction novel by American writer Vernor Vinge, a space opera involving superhuman intelligences, aliens, variable physics, space battles, love, betrayal, genocide, and a conversation medium resembling Usenet. A Fire Upon the Deep won the Hugo Award in 1993, sharing it with Doomsday Book by Connie Willis.

His novellas Fast Times at Fairmont High and The Cookie Monster also won Hugo Awards in 2002 and 2004, respectively. [7] [8]

The Cookie Monster is a science fiction novella by American writer Vernor Vinge. It was first published in the October 2003 issue of Analog.

Vinge's 2006 novel Rainbows End , set in the same universe and featuring some of the same characters as Fast Times at Fairmont High, won the 2007 Hugo Award for Best Novel. [9] In 2011, he released The Children of the Sky , a sequel to A Fire Upon the Deep set approximately 10 years following the end of A Fire Upon the Deep. [10] [11]

<i>Rainbows End</i> science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge

Rainbows End is a 2006 science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge. It was awarded the 2007 Hugo Award for Best Novel. The book is set in San Diego, California, in 2025, in a variation of the fictional world Vinge explored in his 2002 Hugo-winning novella "Fast Times at Fairmont High" and 2004's "Synthetic Serendipity". Vinge has tentative plans for a sequel, picking up some of the loose threads left at the end of the novel. The many technological advances depicted in the novel suggest that the world is undergoing ever-increasing change, following the technological singularity, a recurring subject in Vinge's fiction and nonfiction writing.

Vinge retired in 2000 from teaching at San Diego State University, in order to write full-time. Most years, since its inception in 1999, Vinge has been on the Free Software Foundation's selection committee for their Award for the Advancement of Free Software. Vernor Vinge was Writer Guest of Honor at ConJosé, the 60th World Science Fiction Convention in 2002. [12]

Personal life

His former wife, Joan D. Vinge, is also a science fiction author. They were married from 1972 to 1979. [13]

Bibliography

Novels

Realtime/Bobble series

  • The Peace War (1984) ISBN   0-312-94342-3 — Hugo Award nominee, 1985 [3]
  • The Ungoverned (1985) - first published in Far Frontiers, Volume III, included in Across Realtime (1986) ISBN   0-671-72098-8
  • Marooned in Realtime (1986) ISBN   0-312-94295-8Prometheus Award winner, Hugo Award nominee, 1987 [4]

Zones of Thought series

Standalone novels

Collections

Essays

Uncollected short fiction

Related Research Articles

Joan D. Vinge American writer

Joan D. Vinge is an American science fiction author. She is known for such works as her Hugo Award-winning novel The Snow Queen and its sequels, her series about the telepath named Cat, and her Heaven's Chronicles books.

The Sprawl trilogy is William Gibson's first set of novels, composed of Neuromancer (1984), Count Zero (1986), and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988).

<i>A Deepness in the Sky</i> novel by Vernor Vinge

A Deepness in the Sky is a science fiction novel by American writer Vernor Vinge. Published in 1999, the novel is a loose prequel to his earlier novel A Fire Upon the Deep (1992). The title is coined by one of the story's main characters in a debate, in a reference to the hibernating habits of his species and to the vastness of space.

<i>The Peace War</i> novel by Vernor Vinge

The Peace War is a science fiction novel by American writer Vernor Vinge, about authoritarianism and technological progress. It was first published as a serial in Analog in 1984, and then appeared in book form shortly afterward. It was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1985. Its sequels are "The Ungoverned", which was a novella published in his collection True Names and Other Dangers, and the novel Marooned in Realtime. The Peace War and Marooned in Realtime were collected in Across Realtime.

<i>Marooned in Realtime</i> novel by Vernor Vinge

Marooned in Realtime is a 1986 murder mystery and time-travel science fiction novel by American writer Vernor Vinge, about a small, time-displaced group of people who may be the only survivors of a technological singularity or alien invasion. It is the sequel to the novel The Peace War (1984) and the novella The Ungoverned (1985). Both novels and the novella were collected in Across Realtime.

John E. Stith American writer

John E. Stith is an American science fiction and mystery author, known for the scientific rigor he brings to adventure and mystery stories.

"The Ungoverned" is a 1985 science fiction novella by American writer Vernor Vinge, set between his novels The Peace War and Marooned in Realtime. It was first published in Far Frontiers, Volume III, first collected in True Names and Other Dangers, and later published in the 1991 edition of the omnibus Across Realtime. The novella is a direct exploration of the concept of privately funded decentralized defense in the absence of a State, as described by Gustave de Molinari in "The Production of Security".

62nd World Science Fiction Convention

The 62nd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) was Noreascon 4, which was held in Boston, Massachusetts, from September 2–6, 2004. The venues for the 62nd Worldcon were Hynes Convention Center, Sheraton Boston Hotel and Boston Marriott Copley Place. The convention was organized by Massachusetts Convention Fandom, Inc., and the organizing committee was chaired by Deb Geisler.

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The 58th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) was Chicon 2000, which was held in Chicago, United States from August 31 through September 4, 2000. The venues for 58th Worldcon were Hyatt Regency Chicago, Sofitel Hotel and Fairmont Hotel. The organizing committee was chaired by Tom Veal.

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Nippon 2007, the 65th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) and the 46th Annual Nihon SF Taikai, was held in Yokohama, Japan from 30 August - 3 September 2007, at the Pacifico Yokohama Convention Center and adjoining hotels. The organising committee was chaired by Hiroaki Inoue. The attendance at the convention totaled 2,788, including 1,578 Japanese members, and 1,210 foreign members.

<i>The Witling</i> novel by Vernor Vinge

The Witling is a 1976 science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge, about the planet Giri, whose humanoid inhabitants, the Azhiri, are able to teleport. This ability varies from person to person: those without the talent at all are called witlings and are the lowest class of person in Azhiri society.

60th World Science Fiction Convention

ConJose was the 60th World Science Fiction Convention, held in San Jose, California on August 29-September 2, 2002. The convention was held in the McEnery Convention Center, as well as the Fairmont San Jose and the Hilton San Jose & Towers. ConJose was co-chaired by Tom Whitmore and Kevin Standlee and organized under the auspices of San Francisco Science Fiction Conventions.

<i>Grimms World</i> novel by Vernor Vinge

Grimm's World is a 1969 science fiction novel by Vernor Vinge.

<i>Tatja Grimms World</i> novel by Vernor Vinge

Tatja Grimm's World is a 1978 science fiction novel by American author Vernor Vinge.

References

  1. Vinge, Vernor (1976). The witling. Daw Books = sf. DAW Books Inc, Copyright Paperback Collection (Library of Congress). New York: DAW Books.
  2. Saffo, Paul (1990), "Consensual Realities in Cyberspace", in Denning, Peter J., Computers Under Attack: Intruders, Worms, and Viruses, New York, NY: ACM, pp. 416–20, doi:10.1145/102616.102644, ISBN   0-201-53067-8 . Revised and expansed from "Viewpoint", Communications of the ACM 32 (6): 664–65, 1989,doi : 10.1145/63526.315953.
  3. 1 2 "1985 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  4. 1 2 "1987 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  5. 1 2 3 "1993 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  6. 1 2 3 4 "2000 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  7. "2002 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  8. "2004 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  9. 1 2 3 "2007 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  10. Interview with Vernor Vinge, Norwescon website, October 12, 2009.
  11. "Vernor Vinge's sequel to A Fire Upon The Deep coming in October!".
  12. "Guests of Honor". ConJosé (the 2002 Worldcon).
  13. Stableford, Brian (2006), "Vinge, Vernor (Steffen) (1944–)", Science Fact and Science Fiction: An Encyclopedia, Routledge, pp. 551–552, ISBN   9781135923747
  14. "1992 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  15. "1999 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  16. Vinge, Vernor (October 12, 2000). "Win a Nobel Prize!". Nature. 407 (6805): 679. Bibcode:2000Natur.407..679V. doi:10.1038/35037684.(subscription required)
  17. "The Coming Technological Singularity: How to Survive in the Post-Human Era". Whole Earth Review (Winter 1993). 1993.
  18. Vinge, Vernor (March 23, 2006). "2020 Computing: The creativity machine". Nature. 440 (411). Bibcode:2006Natur.440..411V. doi:10.1038/440411a. ISSN   0028-0836. PMID   16554782 . Retrieved February 14, 2017.
  19. Vernor Vinge reading "A Dry Martini", recorded live at Penguicon 6.0 on April 20th, 2008
  20. Vinge, Vernor (June 30, 2004). "Synthetic Serendipity". IEEE Spectrum.
  21. Vinge, Vernor (26 February 2015). "BFF's first adventure". Nature. 518 (7540): 568. Bibcode:2015Natur.518..568V. doi:10.1038/518568a.
  22. Vinge, Vernor (10 August 2017). "Legale". Nature. 548 (7666): 254. Bibcode:2017Natur.548..254V. doi:10.1038/548254a.

About Vinge

Essays and speeches

Interviews