Victor A. Gangelin

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Victor A. Gangelin
Born(1899-03-04)March 4, 1899
DiedApril 2, 1967(1967-04-02) (aged 68)
OccupationSet decorator
Years active1936-1966

Victor A. Gangelin (March 4, 1899 April 2, 1967) was an American feature film and television set decorator. He won an Oscar (shared with Boris Leven) for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Color for West Side Story (1961). Gangelin was also nominated for another Oscar (with Mark-Lee Kirk) for Best Art Direction-Interior Direction, Black-and-White for Since You Went Away (1944).

Contents

Career

He served as a set director and assistant department head at Warner Brothers studio. Along with his Academy Award-nominated films, his 47 film and television credits include the John Wayne epics The Searchers (1956) [1] and The Alamo (1960) [2] as well as episodes of The Roy Rogers Show and My Mother the Car . His last credit was the 1966 film Duel at Diablo starring James Garner and Sidney Poitier. [3]

Later life

Gangelin died at age 68 in Los Angeles, California. His collection of "over 1,000 early authentic American and English antiques of museum quality" was offered at an estate sale in October 1967. [4]

Selected filmography

Gangelin won an Academy Award for Best Art Direction and was nominated for another:

Won
Nominated

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References

  1. "The Searchers". www.tcm.com.
  2. https://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/17415/The-Alamo/full-credits.html#overview
  3. "Duel At Diablo | TV Guide". TVGuide.com.
  4. "19 Oct 1967, 116 - The Los Angeles Times at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com.
  5. "The 34th Academy Awards (1962) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on February 15, 2015. Retrieved February 19, 2015.
  6. "The 17th Academy Awards (1945) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved August 14, 2011.