Victor Jory

Last updated
Victor Jory
Victor Jory in First Lady trailer.jpg
Jory in First Lady (1937)
Born(1902-11-23)November 23, 1902
Dawson City, Yukon, Canada
DiedFebruary 12, 1982(1982-02-12) (aged 79)
OccupationActor
Years active1930–1980
Spouse(s)Jean Inness Jory (1928–1978, her death; 2 children)

Victor Jory (November 23, 1902 February 12, 1982) was a Canadian-American actor of stage, film, and television. [1] He initially played romantic leads, but later was mostly cast in villainous or sinister roles, like Oberon in A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935), Jonas Wilkerson in Gone with the Wind (1939), and Jabe Torrance in The Fugitive Kind (1960). From 1959 to 1961 he had a lead role in the 78-episode television police drama Manhunt . He also recorded numerous stories for Peter Pan Records.rockford files episode s4ep14

Actor Person who acts in a dramatic or comic production and works in film, television, theatre, or radio

An actor is a person who portrays a character in a performance. The actor performs "in the flesh" in the traditional medium of the theatre or in modern media such as film, radio, and television. The analogous Greek term is ὑποκριτής (hupokritḗs), literally "one who answers". The actor's interpretation of their role—the art of acting—pertains to the role played, whether based on a real person or fictional character. Interpretation occurs even when the actor is "playing themselves", as in some forms of experimental performance art.

<i>A Midsummer Nights Dream</i> (1935 film) 1935 film by William Dieterle and Max Reinhardt

A Midsummer Night's Dream is a 1935 American romance fantasy film of William Shakespeare's play, directed by Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle, and starring James Cagney, Mickey Rooney, Olivia de Havilland, Jean Muir, Joe E. Brown, Dick Powell, Ross Alexander, Anita Louise, Victor Jory and Ian Hunter. Produced by Henry Blanke and Hal B. Wallis for Warner Brothers, and adapted by Charles Kenyon and Mary C. McCall Jr. from Reinhardt's Hollywood Bowl production of the previous year, the film is about the events surrounding the marriage of the Duke of Athens, Theseus, and the Queen of the Amazons, Hippolyta. These include the adventures of four young Athenian lovers and a group of six amateur actors, who are controlled and manipulated by the fairies who inhabit the forest in which most of the story is set. The play, which is categorized as a comedy, is one of Shakespeare's most popular works for the stage and is widely performed across the world. Felix Mendelssohn's music was extensively used, as re-orchestrated by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. The ballet sequences featuring the fairies were choreographed by Bronislava Nijinska.

<i>Gone with the Wind</i> (film) 1939 film by Victor Fleming

Gone with the Wind is a 1939 American epic historical romance film adapted from the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell. The film was produced by David O. Selznick of Selznick International Pictures and directed by Victor Fleming. Set in the American South against the backdrop of the American Civil War and the Reconstruction era, the film tells the story of Scarlett O'Hara, the strong-willed daughter of a Georgia plantation owner. It follows her romantic pursuit of Ashley Wilkes, who is married to his cousin, Melanie Hamilton, and her subsequent marriage to Rhett Butler. The leading roles are played by Vivien Leigh (Scarlett), Clark Gable (Rhett), Leslie Howard (Ashley), and Olivia de Havilland (Melanie).

Contents

Biography

Born in Dawson City, Yukon, of American parents, he was the boxing and wrestling champion of the United States Coast Guard during his military service, and he kept his burly physique. [2] [ unreliable source? ] He graduated from the Martha Oatman School of the Theater. [3]

Dawson City Town in Yukon, Canada

Dawson City, officially the Town of the City of Dawson, is a town in the Canadian territory of Yukon. It is inseparably linked to the Klondike Gold Rush (1896–99). Its population was 1,375 as of the 2016 census, making it the second largest town of Yukon.

Yukon Territory of Canada

Yukon is the smallest and westernmost of Canada's three territories. It has the smallest population of any province or territory in Canada, with 35,874 people, although it has the largest city in any of the three territories. Whitehorse is the territorial capital and Yukon's only city.

United States Coast Guard Coastal defense and law enforcement branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is the coastal defense and maritime law enforcement branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the country's seven uniformed services. The Coast Guard is a maritime, military, multi-mission service unique among the U.S. military branches for having a maritime law enforcement mission and a federal regulatory agency mission as part of its mission set. It operates under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security during peacetime, and can be transferred to the U.S. Department of the Navy by the U.S. President at any time, or by the U.S. Congress during times of war. This has happened twice: in 1917, during World War I, and in 1941, during World War II.

Jory toured with theater troupes and appeared on Broadway, before making his Hollywood debut in 1930. He initially played romantic leads, but later was mostly cast as the villain, likely due to his distinctive seemingly coal-black eyes that might be perceived as 'threatening'. [4] He made over 150 films and dozens of TV episodes, as well as writing two plays. His long career in radio included starring in the series Dangerously Yours. [5]

Broadway theatre class of professional theater presented in New York City, New York, USA

Broadway theatre, also known simply as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Along with London's West End theatre, Broadway theatre is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world.

Hollywood District in Los Angeles, California, United States

Hollywood is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California, notable as the home of the U.S. film industry, including several of its historic studios. Its name has come to be a shorthand reference for the industry and the people associated with it.

He is remembered for his roles as malevolent Injun Joe in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938), Jonas Wilkerson, the opportunistic overseer of the slaves at Tara in Gone with the Wind [6] [ better source needed ] and as Lamont Cranston, aka 'The Shadow', in the 1940 serial film The Shadow . [7] [ better source needed ] He also portrayed Oberon in Max Reinhardt's 1935 film adaptation of Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream . [8] [ better source needed ]

<i>The Adventures of Tom Sawyer</i> (1938 film) 1938 American film directed by Norman Taurog

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a 1938 American literature adaptation produced by David O. Selznick and directed by Norman Taurog starring Tommy Kelly in the title role, with Jackie Moran and Ann Gillis. The screenplay by John V. A. Weaver was based on the classic 1876 novel of the same name by Mark Twain. The movie was the first film version of the novel to be made in color.

<i>The Shadow</i> Fictional character

The Shadow is the name of a collection of serialized dramas, originally in 1930s pulp novels, and then in a wide variety of Shadow media. One of the most famous adventure heroes of 20th century North America, the Shadow has been featured on the radio, in a long-running pulp magazine series, in American comic books, comic strips, television, serials, video games, and at least five feature films. The radio drama included episodes voiced by Orson Welles.

Max Reinhardt Theatre director, actor

Max Reinhardt was an Austrian-born theatre and film director, intendant, and theatrical producer. With his innovative stage productions, he is regarded as one of the most prominent directors of German-language theatre in the early 20th century. In 1920, he established the Salzburg Festival with the performance of Hofmannsthal's Jedermann.

He co-starred in seven Hopalong Cassidy films between the years 1941 and 1943, usually cast in the role of a villain with the exception of his role as a broad-shouldered lumberjack in the film Riders of the Timberline (1941).

Hopalong Cassidy fictional cowboy hero

Hopalong Cassidy or Hop-along Cassidy is a fictional cowboy hero created in 1904 by the author Clarence E. Mulford, who wrote a series of short stories and novels based on the character.

<i>Riders of the Timberline</i> 1941 film by Lesley Selander

Riders of the Timberline is a 1941 American Western film directed by Lesley Selander and written by J. Benton Cheney. The film stars William Boyd, Andy Clyde, Brad King, Victor Jory, Eleanor Stewart, J. Farrell MacDonald and Anna Q. Nilsson. The film was released on September 17, 1941, by Paramount Pictures.

He starred in the radio series "Dangerously Yours" beginning in July, 1944. The series was retitled "Matinee Theater" in October, 1944 and ran through April, 1945. Each episode was a dramatic reworking of famous literary works. The first episode dated 7/2/44 was "The Highwayman", a dramatic interpretation of the Alfred Noyes poem.

In 1946 he narrated "Tubby the Tuba" for children, which was inducted in 2005 in the National Recording Registry and also introduces the orchestra to young listeners. The story tells of a tuba who doesn't fit in. He also narrated "Bumpo the Ballerina", whose title character is an elephant.

National Recording Registry List of sound recordings

The National Recording Registry is a list of sound recordings that "are culturally, historically, or aesthetically important, and/or inform or reflect life in the United States." The registry was established by the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, which created the National Recording Preservation Board, whose members are appointed by the Librarian of Congress. The recordings preserved in the United States National Recording Registry form a registry of recordings selected yearly by the National Recording Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress.

From 1959 to 1961, he appeared with Patrick McVey in the 78-episode syndicated television police drama, Manhunt . Jory played the lead role of Detective Lieutenant Howard Finucane. McVey was cast as police reporter Ben Andrews. [9]

In 1957, Jory was cast in the role of the Southern Baptist pastor George Washington Truett of the First Baptist Church of Dallas, Texas, in the episode "Lone Star Preacher" of the syndicated religion anthology series Crossroads . [10]

In 1962, Jory was cast as Deacon Lee in the two-part episode "Policemen Die Alone" of Leslie Nielsen's ABC crime drama The New Breed . That same year, Jory guest starred as Mike Dahlback in the episode "Ride to a Fall" in the NBC modern western series Empire , which starred Richard Egan as rancher Jim Redigo. He also played Helen Keller's father in The Miracle Worker , for which his costars Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke won Academy Awards.

In 1964, along with actresses Coleen Gray and Susan Seaforth, Jory testified before the United States Congress as part of "Project Prayer," arguing in favor of an amendment to the United States Constitution to restore school prayer, which the United States Supreme Court struck down in two decisions in 1962 and 1963.

Jory was on the faculty of the University of Utah, teaching acting in the Department of Theater. He endowed a scholarship for junior/senior students in the department known as the Victor Jory Scholarship, which continues to the current day. [11] His daughter Jean Jory Anderson was a public-relations director of the theater department at Utah State University at Logan, UT. [12]

The High Chaparral television episode "The Peacemaker" in 1968 featured Jory as a peace envoy attempting to negotiate a treaty with Apache Native American chief Cochise.

In the private-eye TV Series Mannix , Jory played the Armenian-American hero's widowed father, Stefan Mannix—a grape farmer in "Summer Grove", a fictitious town in California's Central Valley near Fresno (which continues to have a large Armenian population). He appeared in two episodes,"Return to Summer Grove" (1969) and "Wine from These Grape"(1971).

In 1977, near the end of his career, Jory guest starred as an aging Federal Bureau of Investigation agent in James Garner's The Rockford Files episode "The Attractive Nuisance."

Jory died on February 12, 1982 at the age of 79 from a heart attack in Santa Monica, California. [1]

For his contribution to the motion-picture industry, Victor Jory was honored in 1960 with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. His star is located at 6605 Hollywood Blvd. [13]

Family

Jory had two children, Jon and Jean. Jon Jory headed the Actors Theater of Louisville, Kentucky, for thirty-one years, which he helped to build into one of America's most respected regional theater companies. He left the job in 2000 to become professor of drama at the University of Washington in Seattle.

TV and films

Victor Jory as Oberon in an outtake from the film A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935) Victor Jory as Oberon, 1935.png
Victor Jory as Oberon in an outtake from the film A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935)
Jory's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6605 Hollywood Blvd. Victor Jory star HWF.JPG
Jory's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6605 Hollywood Blvd.

Radio appearances

YearProgramEpisode/source
1953 Grand Central Station Lost Year (with daughter Jean) [14]
1959SuspenseDeath Notice

Related Research Articles

Fred MacMurray American actor

Frederick Martin MacMurray was an American actor and singer who appeared in more than 100 films and a successful television series during a career that spanned nearly a half-century, from 1930 to the 1970s.

Lon Chaney Jr. American actor

Creighton Tull Chaney, known by his stage name Lon Chaney Jr., was an American actor known for playing Larry Talbot in the film The Wolf Man (1941) and its various crossovers, Count Alucard, Frankenstein's monster in The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942), the Mummy in three pictures, and various other roles in many Universal horror films. He also portrayed Lennie Small in Of Mice and Men (1939) and supporting parts in dozens of mainstream movies. Originally referenced in films as Creighton Chaney, he was later credited as "Lon Chaney, Jr." in 1935, and after Man Made Monster (1941), beginning as early as The Wolf Man later that same year, he was almost always billed under his more famous father's name as Lon Chaney. Chaney had English, French, and Irish ancestry, and his career in movies and television spanned four decades, from 1931 to 1971.

Andy Devine actor

Andrew Vabre Devine was an American character actor known for his distinctive raspy, crackly voice and roles in Western films. He is probably best remembered for his role as Cookie, the sidekick of Roy Rogers in 10 feature films. He also appeared alongside John Wayne in films like Stagecoach (1939), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and How the West Was Won. He is also remembered as Jingles on the TV series The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok from 1951 to 1958, as Danny McGuire in A Star Is Born (1937) and as the voice of Friar Tuck in the Disney Animation film Robin Hood (1973).

Dick Powell American singer, actor, film producer, film director and studio head

Dick Powell born Richard Ewing Powell was an American singer, actor, voice actor, film producer, film director and studio head. Though he came to stardom as a musical comedy performer, he showed versatility and successfully transformed into a hardboiled leading man starring in projects of a more dramatic nature. He was the first actor to portray the private detective Philip Marlowe on screen.

Cesar Romero American actor

Cesar Julio Romero Jr. was an American actor, singer, dancer and vocal artist. He was active in film, radio, and television for almost 60 years.

Ralph Bellamy American actor

Ralph Rexford Bellamy was an American actor whose career spanned 62 years on stage, film, and television. During his career, he played leading roles as well as supporting roles, garnering acclaim and awards, including an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for The Awful Truth (1937).

Brian Donlevy American actor

Waldo Brian Donlevy was an American actor, noted for playing dangerous tough guys from the 1930s to the 1960s. He usually appeared in supporting roles. Among his best-known films are Beau Geste (1939), The Great McGinty (1940) and Wake Island 1942, in which he played the lead. For his role as Sergeant Markoff in Beau Geste, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Kitty Kelly Stage, film, television actress

Kitty Kelly, was an American stage and film character actress.

Gilbert Roland American actor

Gilbert Roland was a Mexican-born American film and television actor whose career spanned seven decades from the 1920s until the 1980s. He was twice nominated for the Golden Globe Award in 1952 and 1964, and inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960.

Tom Tyler actor

Tom Tyler was an American actor known for his leading roles in low-budget Western films in the silent and sound eras, and for his portrayal of superhero Captain Marvel in the 1941 serial film The Adventures of Captain Marvel. Tyler also played the mummy in 1940's The Mummy's Hand, a popular Universal Studios monster film.

Richard Carlson (actor) American actor, television and film director, and screenwriter

Richard Dutoit Carlson was an American actor, television and film director, and screenwriter.

Regis Toomey actor

John Regis Toomey was an American film and television actor.

Don "Red" Barry American actor

Donald Barry de Acosta, born Donald Barry De Acosta, known as Red Barry, was an American film and television actor. He was nicknamed "Red" after appearing as the first Red Ryder in the highly successful 1940 film Adventures of Red Ryder; the character was played in later films by "Wild Bill" Elliott and Allan Lane. Barry went on to bigger budget films following Red Ryder, but none reached his previous level of success. He played Red Doyle in the 1964 Perry Mason episode 'The Case of the Simple Simon'.

George Sherman was an American film director and producer of low-budget Western films.

Paul Fix American film and television character actor, best known for his work in Westerns

Peter Paul Fix was an American film and television character actor who was best known for his work in Westerns. Fix appeared in more than a hundred movies and dozens of television shows over a 56-year career between 1925 and 1981. Fix was best known for portraying Marshal Micah Torrance, opposite Chuck Connors's character in The Rifleman from 1958 to 1963. He later appeared with Chuck Connors in the 1966 western film Ride Beyond Vengeance.

Eduardo Ciannelli Italian actor

Eduardo Ciannelli, sometimes credited as Edward Ciannelli,, was an Italian baritone and character actor with a long career in American films, mostly playing gangsters and criminals.

Addison Richards American actor

Addison Whittaker Richards, Jr. was an American actor of film and television. Richards appeared in more than three hundred films between 1933 and his death.

Grant Mitchell (actor) American actor

John Grant Mitchell Jr. was an American stage actor on Broadway and mainly a character actor on film. He appeared on Broadway from 1902 to 1939 and appeared in more than 125 films between 1930 and 1948.

Forrest Taylor actor

Edwin Forrest Taylor was an American character actor whose artistic career spanned six different decades, from silents through talkies to the advent of color films.

Art Mix American actor

Art Mix, was an American character actor from the 1920s until the mid-1940s. Prior to becoming an actor, Mix worked as a circus performer and a boxer. He initially appeared under his real name, Kesterson, before being given his stage name of Mix by Victor Adamson. During his career he appeared in over 200 film shorts and feature films. Although most of his roles were in smaller and bit parts, he would sometimes be cast in a featured role, such as in 1932's Border Devils, starring Harry Carey. Rarely, he was even given the lead role, as in the 1935 "B"-western, The Rawhide Terror.

References

  1. 1 2 Victor Jory - LA Times Hollywood Star Walk
  2. All Movie Guide via Answers.com
  3. "Oatman School offers new class". The Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. July 15, 1928. p. 45. Retrieved 2 June 2019 via Newspapers.com.
  4. "AMERICAN ACTOR FOR AUSTRALIAN FILM." The Sydney Morning Herald 2 Jun 1936: 24 Supplement: Women's Supplement accessed 26 Dec 2011
  5. The Definitive Dangerously Yours Radio Log
  6. Gone with the Wind (film)
  7. The Shadow
  8. A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935 film)
  9. "Victor Jory 'Shot' by Western Actor". Los Angeles Times . November 11, 1961. p. 19. Observers said a gun in the hands of actor Adam Williams discharged accidentally at a range of 6 in., inflicting powder burns.
  10. "Lone Star Preacher". Internet Movie Data Base, March 15, 1957. Retrieved February 19, 2013.
  11. The University of Utah: Victor Jory Scholarship. https://utah.academicworks.com/opportunities/8353 Accessed June 2019
  12. Boyd Magers. Characters and Heavies: Victor Jory http://www.westernclippings.com/heavies/victorjory_charactersheavies.shtml Accessed June 2019
  13. Victor Jory - Hollywood Walk of Fame
  14. Kirby, Walter (May 17, 1953). "Better Radio Programs for the Week". The Decatur Daily Review. p. 48. Retrieved June 27, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg