Vilyuchinsk

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Vilyuchinsk
Вилючинск(Russian)
-   Town [1]   -
Viliuchinsk.JPG
Outline Map of Kamchatka Krai.png
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Vilyuchinsk
Location of Vilyuchinsk in Kamchatka Krai
Coats of Arms of Viluchinsk.svg
Flag of Viluchinsk.svg
Coat of arms
Flag
Administrative status  (as of March 2010)
Country Russia
Federal subject Kamchatka Krai
Administratively subordinated toVilyuchinsk Town Under Krai Jurisdiction [1]
Administrative center ofVilyuchinsk Town Under Krai Jurisdiction [1]
Municipal status  (as of December 2004)
Urban okrugVilyuchinsky Urban Okrug [2]
Administrative center ofVilyuchinsky Urban Okrug [2]
Mayor[ citation needed ]Alexey Sova[ citation needed ]
Statistics
Population (2010 Census)22,905 inhabitants [3]
Time zone PETT (UTC+12:00) [4]
FoundedOctober 16, 1968[ citation needed ]
Postal code(s) [5] 684090–684093
Dialing code(s) +7 41535[ citation needed ]
Website
Vilyuchinsk on Wikimedia Commons

Vilyuchinsk (Russian : Вилючинск) is a closed town in Kamchatka Krai, Russia, located on the Kamchatka Peninsula about 20 kilometers (12 mi) across Avacha Bay from Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. Population: 22,905(2010 Census); [3] 24,166(2002 Census). [6]

Russian language East Slavic language

Russian is an East Slavic language, which is official in the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely used throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia. It was the de facto language of the Soviet Union until its dissolution on 25 December 1991. Although nearly three decades have passed since the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russian is used in official capacity or in public life in all the post-Soviet nation-states, as well as in Israel and Mongolia.

Closed city settlement where specific authorization is required to visit

A closed city or closed town is a settlement where travel or residency restrictions are applied so that specific authorization is required to visit or remain overnight. They may be sensitive military establishments or secret research installations that require much more space or freedom than is available in a conventional military base. There may also be a wider variety of permanent residents including close family members of workers or trusted traders who are not directly connected with its clandestine purposes.

The classification system of the types of inhabited localities in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and some other post-Soviet states has certain peculiarities compared with the classification systems in other countries.

Contents

History

It was founded as Sovetsky (Сове́тский) on October 16, 1968 through the amalgamation of three earlier settlements which supplied the Soviet Navy and served as a base for submarine construction: Rybachy, Primorsky, and Seldevaya.[ citation needed ] In 1970, as with other closed towns in the Soviet Union, it was given a code name based on the nearest major city, becoming known officially as Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky-50 until 1994. In 1994, the town was renamed after the nearby volcano, Vilyuchik.

Soviet Navy naval arm of the Soviet Armed Forces

The Soviet Navy was the naval arm of the Soviet Armed Forces. Often referred to as the Red Fleet, the Soviet Navy was a large part of the Soviet Union's strategic plan in the event of a conflict with opposing super power, the United States, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), or another conflict related to the Warsaw Pact of Eastern Europe. The influence of the Soviet Navy played a large role in the Cold War (1945-1991), as the majority of conflicts centered on naval forces.

Soviet Union 1922–1991 country in Europe and Asia

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. Other major urban centres were Leningrad, Kiev, Minsk, Alma-Ata, and Novosibirsk. It spanned over 10,000 kilometres east to west across 11 time zones, and over 7,200 kilometres north to south. It had five climate zones: tundra, taiga, steppes, desert and mountains.

Administrative and municipal status

Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as Vilyuchinsk Town Under Krai Jurisdiction —an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. [1] As a municipal division, Vilyuchinsk Town Under Krai Jurisdiction is incorporated as Vilyuchinsky Urban Okrug. [2]

City of federal subject significance is an umbrella term used to refer to a type of an administrative division of a federal subject of Russia which is equal in status to a district but is organized around a large city; occasionally with surrounding rural territories.

Kamchatka Krai was formed on July 1, 2007 as a result of the merger of Kamchatka Oblast with Koryak Autonomous Okrug.

Economy

Besides the construction of nuclear submarines, the town's economy is largely reliant on fishing and processing of fish. In the suburb of Rybachy, one of the three original settlements from which the town was created, a squadron of submarines of the Russian Pacific Fleet has been based since August 1938. The local ship-repair industry began to develop in late 1959.

A nuclear submarine is a submarine powered by a nuclear reactor. The performance advantages of nuclear submarines over "conventional" submarines are considerable. Nuclear propulsion, being completely independent of air, frees the submarine from the need to surface frequently, as is necessary for conventional submarines. The large amount of power generated by a nuclear reactor allows nuclear submarines to operate at high speed for long periods of time; and the long interval between refuelings grants a range virtually unlimited, making the only limits on voyage times being imposed by such factors as the need to restock food or other consumables.

Fishing Activity of trying to catch fish

Fishing is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. “Fishing” may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms. The term is not normally applied to catching farmed fish, or to aquatic mammals, such as whales where the term whaling is more appropriate. In addition to being caught to be eaten, fish are caught as recreational pastimes. Fishing tournaments are held, and caught fish are sometimes kept as preserved or living trophies. When bioblitzes occur, fish are typically caught, identified, and then released.

Despite plans for the navy base to be closed in 2003 due to lack of finances, this has continued to operate. The base had been modernized in the late 2000s with newly constructed residential buildings, a hospital, nursery school, and a sports center with a water park opened in 2007 personally by President Vladimir Putin. [7]

President of Russia head of state of the RSFSR (office established in 1991) and Russia

The President of Russia, officially the President of the Russian Federation, is the head of state of the Russian Federation, as well as holder of the highest office in Russia and commander-in-chief of the Russian Armed Forces.

Vladimir Putin Russian politician, 2nd and 4th President of Russia

Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin is a Russian politician and former intelligence officer serving as President of Russia since 2012, previously holding the position from 2000 until 2008. In between his presidential terms he was also the Prime Minister of Russia under his close associate Dmitry Medvedev.

Religion

Two Russian Orthodox churches were built in the 1990s, the first in the town.

Russian Orthodox Church autocephalous Orthodox Christian church, headquartered in Moscow, Russia

The Russian Orthodox Church, alternatively legally known as the Moscow Patriarchate, is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Christian churches. The Primate of the ROC is the Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus'. The ROC, as well as the primate thereof, officially ranks fifth in the Orthodox order of precedence, immediately below the four ancient patriarchates of the Greek Orthodox Church, those of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. Since 15 October 2018, the ROC is not in communion with the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, having unilaterally severed ties in reaction to the establishment of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine, which was finalised by the Ecumenical Patriarchate on 5 January 2019.

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Milkovsky District District in Kamchatka Krai, Russia

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Sobolevsky District District in Kamchatka Krai, Russia

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Karaginsky District District in Kamchatka Krai, Russia

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Olyutorsky District District in Kamchatka Krai, Russia

Olyutorsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion) of Koryak Okrug of Kamchatka Krai, Russia, one of the eleven in the krai. It is located in the northeast of the krai. The area of the district is 72,352 square kilometers (27,935 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Tilichiki. Population: 5,036 (2010 Census); 7,170 (2002 Census); 12,833 (1989 Census). The population of Tilichiki accounts for 34.6% of the district's total population.

Penzhinsky District District in Kamchatka Krai, Russia

Penzhinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion) of Koryak Okrug of Kamchatka Krai, Russia, one of the eleven in the krai. It is located in the northwest of the krai. The area of the district is 116,086 square kilometers (44,821 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Kamenskoye. Population: 2,340 (2010 Census); 2,990 (2002 Census); 5,301 (1989 Census). The population of Kamenskoye accounts for 28.0% of the district's total population.

Tigilsky District District in Kamchatka Krai, Russia

Tigilsky District is an administrative district (raion) of Koryak Okrug of Kamchatka Krai, Russia, one of the eleven in the krai. It is located in the west of the krai. The area of the district is 63,484 square kilometers (24,511 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Tigil. Population: 7,307 (2010 Census); 9,341 (2002 Census); 12,452 (1989 Census). The population of Tigil accounts for 23.1% of the district's total population.

Milkovo is a rural locality and the administrative center of Milkovsky District, Kamchatka Krai, Russia. Population: 8,251 (2010 Census); 9,243 (2002 Census); 12,132 (1989 Census).

Sobolevo is a rural locality and the administrative center of Sobolevsky District, Kamchatka Krai, Russia. Population: 1,773 (2010 Census); 1,893 (2002 Census); 2,922 (1989 Census).

Ust-Bolsheretsk is a rural locality and the administrative center of Ust-Bolsheretsky District, Kamchatka Krai, Russia. Population: 2,116 (2010 Census); 2,277 (2002 Census); 3,075 (1989 Census).

References

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Law #46
  2. 1 2 3 Law #242
  3. 1 2 Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года (2010 All-Russia Population Census) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service . Retrieved June 29, 2012.
  4. Правительство Российской Федерации. Федеральный закон №107-ФЗ от 3 июня 2011 г. «Об исчислении времени», в ред. Федерального закона №271-ФЗ от 03 июля 2016 г. «О внесении изменений в Федеральный закон "Об исчислении времени"». Вступил в силу по истечении шестидесяти дней после дня официального опубликования (6 августа 2011 г.). Опубликован: "Российская газета", №120, 6 июня 2011 г. (Government of the Russian Federation. Federal Law #107-FZ of June 31, 2011 On Calculating Time , as amended by the Federal Law #271-FZ of July 03, 2016 On Amending Federal Law "On Calculating Time". Effective as of after sixty days following the day of the official publication.).
  5. Почта России. Информационно-вычислительный центр ОАСУ РПО. (Russian Post). Поиск объектов почтовой связи (Postal Objects Search) (in Russian)
  6. Russian Federal State Statistics Service (May 21, 2004). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек" [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000](XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian). Retrieved August 9, 2014.
  7. "Media: Vilyuchinsk Base Cannot Accommodate New Borei Subs" Archived May 14, 2012, at the Wayback Machine .

Sources