Vince Stevenson

Last updated
Vince Stevenson
Vincestevensonfootball.jpg
Born:(1884-03-01)March 1, 1884
Livingston, Kentucky
Died:August 7, 1962(1962-08-07) (aged 78)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Career information
Position(s) Quarterback
College Penn
Career history
As player
1906 Canton Bulldogs
Career highlights and awards

Vincent Stevenson (March 1, 1884 – August 7, 1962) was an American football player. He played college football for the Penn Quakers in 1904 and 1905. In 1904, he earned All-American honors from Walter Camp, after leading his team to a 12–0 record, in which the Quakers outscored their opponents 222–4.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, the team with possession of the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with the ball or passing it, while the defense, the team without possession of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs or plays; if they fail, they turn over the football to the defense, but if they succeed, they are given a new set of four downs to continue the drive. Points are scored primarily by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

College Football is gridiron football consisting of American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Penn Quakers football

The Penn Quakers football team is the college football team at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Penn Quakers have competed in the Ivy League since its inaugural season of 1956, and are currently a Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Penn has played in 1,364 football games, the most of any school in any division. Penn plays its home games at historic Franklin Field, the oldest football stadium in the US. All Penn games are broadcast on WNTP or WFIL radio.

In 1906, Stevenson played professionally for the Canton Bulldogs of the "Ohio League". However, he was injured his knee in the third game of the season and was replaced at quarterback by Twister Steinberg – until he was relieved by Jack Hayden. Stevenson tried to recover and rejoin the team, however the medical consensus was for him to sit out the remainder of the season, so that the bone could heal properly. The injury prevented Stevenson from taking part in Canton's two game series, against the rival Massillon Tigers, that would result in a scandal.

The Canton Bulldogs were a professional American football team, based in Canton, Ohio. They played in the Ohio League from 1903 to 1906 and 1911 to 1919, and the American Professional Football Association, from 1920 to 1923 and again from 1925 to 1926. The Bulldogs would go on to win the 1916, 1917 and 1919 Ohio League championships. They were the NFL champions in 1922 and 1923. In 1921–1923, the Bulldogs played 25 straight games without a defeat, which as of 2018 remains an NFL record. As a result of the Bulldogs' early success along with the league being founded in the city, the Pro Football Hall of Fame is located in Canton. Jim Thorpe, the Olympian and renowned all-around athlete, was Canton's most-recognized player in the pre-NFL era.

The Ohio League was an informal and loose association of American football clubs active between 1902 and 1919 that competed for the Ohio Independent Championship (OIC). As the name implied, its teams were mostly based in Ohio. It is the direct predecessor to the modern National Football League (NFL).

Quarterback Position in gridiron football

The quarterback, colloquially known as the "signal caller", is a position in gridiron football. Quarterbacks are members of the offensive team and line up directly behind the offensive line. In modern American football, the quarterback is usually considered the leader of the offensive team, and is often responsible for calling the play in the huddle. The quarterback also touches the ball on almost every offensive play, and is the offensive player that almost always throws forward passes. When the QB is tackled, it is called a sack.

During the 1910s, he became a crewman on several trans-oceanic oil tankers. World War I was now taking place and these tankers were frequent targets for German U-boats. Although he was reported missing on several occasions, he always showed up unharmed in some distant port.

World War I 1914–1918 global war starting in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the Seminal Catastrophe, and initially in North America as the European War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

In 1949, while watching a game between Penn and Cornell, Stevenson proclaimed: "I don't like this two-platoon business," showing his favor having players play on both offense and defense. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1968.

The Cornell Big Red football team represents Cornell University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) college football competition as a member of the Ivy League. It is one of the oldest and most storied football programs in the nation. The team has attained five national championships and has had seven players inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

College Football Hall of Fame College sports hall of fame in Atlanta, Georgia

The College Football Hall of Fame is a hall of fame and interactive attraction devoted to college football. The National Football Foundation (NFF) founded the Hall in 1951 to immortalize the players and coaches of college football.

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