Vincent Harris

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E Vincent Harris
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Vincent Harris
Born(1876-06-26)26 June 1876
Died1 August 1971(1971-08-01) (aged 95)
Nationality United Kingdom
OccupationArchitect
Buildings Manchester Central Library (1934)
Sheffield City Hall (1932)
Leeds Civic Hall (1933)
Projects Manchester Town Hall Extension (1938)

Emanuel Vincent Harris OBE RA (26 June 1876 1 August 1971), often known as E. Vincent Harris, was an English architect who designed several important public buildings.

Architect person trained to plan and design buildings, and oversee their construction

An architect is a person who plans, designs and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings that have human occupancy or use as their principal purpose. Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek, i.e., chief builder.

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Early life

He was born in Devonport, Devon and educated at Kingsbridge Grammar School. He was articled to the Plymouth architect James Harvey in 1893; [1] in 1897 he moved to London, where he assisted E. Keynes Purchase, Leonard Stokes and Sir William Emerson. [1] From 1901 to 1907 he worked for the London County Council before setting up in private practice.

Devon County of England

Devon, also known as Devonshire, is a county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel in the north to the English Channel in the south. It is part of South West England, bounded by Cornwall to the west, Somerset to the north east, and Dorset to the east. The city of Exeter is the county town. The county includes the districts of East Devon, Mid Devon, North Devon, South Hams, Teignbridge, Torridge, and West Devon. Plymouth and Torbay are each geographically part of Devon, but are administered as unitary authorities. Combined as a ceremonial county, Devon's area is 6,707 km2 and its population is about 1.1 million.

Kingsbridge Market town in the South Hams district of Devon, England

Kingsbridge is a market town and tourist hub in the South Hams district of Devon, England, with a population of 6,116 at the 2011 census. Two electoral wards bear the name of Kingsbridge. Their combined population at the above census was 4,381. It is situated at the northern end of the Kingsbridge Estuary, a ria that extends to the sea six miles south of the town. It is the third largest settlement in the South Hams.

Plymouth City and Unitary authority in England

Plymouth is a port city situated on the south coast of Devon, England, approximately 37 miles (60 km) south-west of Exeter and 190 miles (310 km) west-south-west of London. Enclosing the city are the mouths of the river Plym and river Tamar, which are naturally incorporated into Plymouth Sound to form a boundary with Cornwall.

Work

He was primarily a classicist; A. Stuart Gray wrote: "Some of his buildings suggest the influence of Sir Edwin Lutyens, but are bolder, balder, and less subtle or more frank depending on ones point of view." [1] His work was often criticised by modernist architects. In his acceptance speech when he was awarded the RIBA Royal Gold Medal in 1951 [2] Harris is reported to have said: "Look, a lot of you here tonight don't like what I do and I don't like what a lot of you do ...". [1]

Classical architecture Architectural style

Classical architecture usually denotes architecture which is more or less consciously derived from the principles of Greek and Roman architecture of classical antiquity, or sometimes even more specifically, from the works of Vitruvius. Different styles of classical architecture have arguably existed since the Carolingian Renaissance, and prominently since the Italian Renaissance. Although classical styles of architecture can vary greatly, they can in general all be said to draw on a common "vocabulary" of decorative and constructive elements. In much of the Western world, different classical architectural styles have dominated the history of architecture from the Renaissance until the second world war, though it continues to inform many architects to this day.

Edwin Lutyens British architect

Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens, was an English architect known for imaginatively adapting traditional architectural styles to the requirements of his era. He designed many English country houses, war memorials and public buildings. In his biography, the writer Christopher Hussey wrote, "In his lifetime (Lutyens) was widely held to be our greatest architect since Wren if not, as many maintained, his superior". The architectural historian Gavin Stamp described him as "surely the greatest British architect of the twentieth century".

Modern architecture broad type of architecture

Modern architecture, or modernist architecture was based upon new and innovative technologies of construction, particularly the use of glass, steel and reinforced concrete; the idea that form should follow function; an embrace of minimalism; and a rejection of ornament. It emerged in the first half of the 20th century and became dominant after World War II until the 1980s, when it was gradually replaced as the principal style for institutional and corporate buildings by postmodern architecture.

He became an Associate of the Royal Academy in 1942. He died in Bath in 1971 and is buried in the village of Chaffcombe, Somerset.

Bath, Somerset City in Somerset, England

Bath is the largest city in the county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859. Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage site in 1987.

Chaffcombe a village located in South Somerset, United Kingdom

Chaffcombe is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated 2 miles (3.2 km) north east of Chard in the South Somerset district. The village has a population of 229.

Important works

University of Exeter public research university located in South West England, United Kingdom

The University of Exeter is a public research university in Exeter, Devon, South West England, United Kingdom. It was founded and received its Royal Charter in 1955, although its predecessor institutions, St Luke's College, Exeter School of Science, Exeter School of Art, and the Camborne School of Mines were established in 1838, 1855, 1863, and 1888 respectively. In post-nominals, the University of Exeter is abbreviated as Exon., and is the suffix given to honorary and academic degrees from the university.

Streatham Campus

The Streatham Campus in Exeter, Devon is the largest campus of the University of Exeter. The centre of the campus is occupied by teaching, administrative and service buildings. Most of the university's student halls of residence, and some accommodation for postgraduates and families, are on its edges.

Mary Harris Memorial Chapel of the Holy Trinity Church

The Mary Harris Memorial Chapel of the Holy Trinity is the Anglican Chaplaincy's chapel on the Streatham Campus of the University of Exeter. It is located at the heart of the campus, beneath Queen's Building and adjacent to the Old Library and the Roborough Building.

Ministry of Defence Main Building (United Kingdom) headquarters of the Ministry of Defence in Whitehall, London

The Ministry of Defence Main Building or MOD Main Building also known as MOD Whitehall or originally as the Whitehall Gardens Building, is a grade I listed government office building located on Whitehall in London. The building was designed by E. Vincent Harris in 1915 and constructed between 1939 and 1959 on the site of the Palace of Whitehall. It was initially occupied by the Air Ministry and the Board of Trade before in 1964 becoming the current home of the Ministry of Defence.

Sheffield City Hall concert hall and multi-purpose events venue in Sheffield, England

Sheffield City Hall is a Grade II* listed building in Sheffield, England which dominates Barker's Pool, one of Sheffield's central squares. It was built and is owned by Sheffield City Council but is now managed by the Sheffield City Trust, under a 99-year lease and is operated by Sheffield International Venues as a venue for concerts and other events in its various rooms.

Leeds Civic Hall

Leeds Civic Hall is a municipal building located in the civic quarter of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It replaced Leeds Town Hall as the administrative centre in 1933. The Civic Hall houses Leeds City Council offices, council chamber and a banqueting hall, and is a Grade II* listed building. A city landmark, two 2.3 metres high gold-leafed owls top its twin towers, decorations which are joined by four more owls on columns in Millennium Square, which sits to the front, and a gilded clock on both sides.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Julian Holder (2007), Emanuel Vincent Harris and the survival of classicism in inter-war Manchester, in: Clare Hartwell & Terry Wyke (editors), Making Manchester, Lancashire & Cheshire Antiquarian Society, ISBN   978-0-900942-01-3
  2. Allinson, Kenneth. (2008). Architects and Architecture of London. Oxford: Elsevier. p. 294. ISBN   9780750683371.
  3. "History of City Hall - formerly known as the Council House". Bristol City Council. Archived from the original on 13 April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.

Further reading