Vincent Harris

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E Vincent Harris
E Vincent Harris.JPG
Vincent Harris
Born(1876-06-26)26 June 1876
Died1 August 1971(1971-08-01) (aged 95)
Nationality United Kingdom
OccupationArchitect
Buildings Manchester Central Library (1934)
Sheffield City Hall (1932)
Leeds Civic Hall (1933)
Projects Manchester Town Hall Extension (1938)

Emanuel Vincent Harris OBE RA (26 June 1876 1 August 1971), often known as E. Vincent Harris, was an English architect who designed several important public buildings.

Contents

Early life

He was born in Devonport, Devon and educated at Kingsbridge Grammar School. He was articled to the Plymouth architect James Harvey in 1893; [1] in 1897 he moved to London, where he assisted E. Keynes Purchase, Leonard Stokes and Sir William Emerson. [1] From 1901 to 1907 he worked for the London County Council before setting up in private practice.

Work

He was primarily a classicist; A. Stuart Gray wrote: "Some of his buildings suggest the influence of Sir Edwin Lutyens, but are bolder, balder, and less subtle or more frank depending on ones point of view." [1] His work was often criticised by modernist architects. In his acceptance speech when he was awarded the RIBA Royal Gold Medal in 1951 [2] Harris is reported to have said: "Look, a lot of you here tonight don't like what I do and I don't like what a lot of you do ...". [1]

He became an Associate of the Royal Academy in 1942. He died in Bath in 1971 and is buried in the village of Chaffcombe, Somerset.

Important works

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Julian Holder (2007), Emanuel Vincent Harris and the survival of classicism in inter-war Manchester, in: Clare Hartwell & Terry Wyke (editors), Making Manchester, Lancashire & Cheshire Antiquarian Society, ISBN   978-0-900942-01-3
  2. Allinson, Kenneth. (2008). Architects and Architecture of London. Oxford: Elsevier. p. 294. ISBN   9780750683371.
  3. "History of City Hall - formerly known as the Council House". Bristol City Council. Archived from the original on 13 April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.

Further reading