Vincent Korda

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Vincent Korda
VincentKorda.jpg
Born(1897-06-22)22 June 1897
Túrkeve, Austria-Hungary (now Hungary)
Died4 January 1979(1979-01-04) (aged 81)
London, England
Occupation Art director
Years active1931–1964
Spouse(s)Leila Hyde
(m. 1947; d. 19??)
Gertrude Musgrove
(m. 19??)
Children2, including Michael Korda
Family Alexander Korda (brother)
Zoltan Korda (brother)
Chris Korda (granddaughter)

Vincent Korda (22 June 1897 4 January 1979) was a Hungarian-born art director, later settling in Britain. Born in Túrkeve in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, he was the younger brother of Alexander and Zoltan Korda. He was nominated for four Academy Awards, winning once. He died in London, England. He is the father of writer and editor Michael Korda, and the grandfather of Chris Korda. [1]

Contents

Academy Awards

Korda won an Academy Award for Best Art Direction and was nominated for three more:

Won

Nominated

Filmography

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References

  1. Korda, Michael (1999). Another life : a memoir of other people (1st ed.). New York: Random House. ISBN   0679456597.
  2. "The 13th Academy Awards (1941) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 12 August 2011.
  3. "The 14th Academy Awards (1942) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2011.
  4. "The 15th Academy Awards (1943) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2011.
  5. "The 35th Academy Awards (1963) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved 23 August 2011.