Vincent Korda

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Vincent Korda
Born(1897-06-22)22 June 1897
Túrkeve, Austria-Hungary (now Hungary)
Died4 January 1979(1979-01-04) (aged 81)
London, England
Occupation Art director
Years active1931–1964
Spouse(s)Leila Hyde
(m. 1947; d. 19??)
Gertrude Musgrove
(m. 19??)
Children2, including Michael Korda
Family Alexander Korda (brother)
Zoltan Korda (brother)

Vincent Korda (22 June 1897 4 January 1979) was a Hungarian-born art director, later settling in Britain. Born in Túrkeve in the then Austro-Hungarian Empire, he was the younger brother of Alexander and Zoltan Korda. He was nominated for four Academy Awards, winning once. He died in London, England. He is the father of writer and editor Michael Korda. [1]

Túrkeve Town in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok, Hungary

Túrkeve is a town in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok county, in the Northern Great Plain region of Hungary.

Alexander Korda Hungarian-born British film producer and director

Sir Alexander Korda was a British film producer and director and screenwriter, who founded his own film production studios and film distribution company.

Zoltan Korda film director, film producer

Zoltan Korda was a Hungarian-born motion picture screenwriter, director and producer. He made his first film in Hungary in 1918, and worked with his brother Alexander Korda on film-making there and in London. They both moved to the United States in 1940 to Hollywood and the American film industry.

Contents

Academy Awards

Korda won an Academy Award for Best Art Direction and was nominated for three more:

The Academy Award for Best Production Design recognizes achievement for art direction in film. The category's original name was Best Art Direction, but was changed to its current name in 2012 for the 85th Academy Awards. This change resulted from the Art Director's branch of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) being renamed the Designer's branch. Since 1947, the award is shared with the set decorator(s). It is awarded to the best interior design in a film.

Won

Nominated

<i>That Hamilton Woman</i> 1941 film by Alexander Korda

That Hamilton Woman, also known as Lady Hamilton and The Enchantress, is a 1941 black-and-white historical film drama, produced and directed by Alexander Korda for his British company during his exile in the United States. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, the film tells the story of the rise and fall of Emma Hamilton, dance-hall girl and courtesan, who married Sir William Hamilton, British ambassador to the Kingdom of Naples. She later became mistress to Admiral Horatio Nelson. The film was a critical and financial success, and while on the surface the plot is both a war story and a romance set in Napoleonic times, it was also intended to function as a deliberately pro-British film that would portray Britain positively within the context of World War II which was being fought at that time. At the time the film was released France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Denmark had all surrendered to the Nazis and the Soviet Union was still officially allied to them, correspondingly the British were fighting against the Nazis alone and felt the need to produce films that would both boost their own morale, and also portray them sympathetically to the foreign world, and in particular, to the United States.

<i>Rudyard Kiplings Jungle Book</i> 1942 film by Zoltan Korda

Jungle Book is a 1942 independent Technicolor action-adventure film by the Hungarian Korda brothers, based on a screenplay adaptation by Laurence Stallings of Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book, about a wild boy who is kidnapped by villagers who are cruel to animals as they attempt to steal a dead king's cursed treasure.

<i>The Longest Day</i> (film) 1962 war film by Ken Annakin, Andrew Marton, and Bernhard Wicki

The Longest Day is a 1962 epic war film based on Cornelius Ryan's 1959 book The Longest Day (1959) about the D-Day landings at Normandy on June 6, 1944, during World War II. The film was produced by Darryl F. Zanuck, who paid author Ryan $175,000 for the film rights. The screenplay was by Ryan, with additional material written by Romain Gary, James Jones, David Pursall, and Jack Seddon. It was directed by Ken Annakin, Andrew Marton, and Bernhard Wicki.

Filmography

<i>Marius</i> (1931 film) 1931 film by Alexander Korda

Marius is a 1931 French drama film directed by Alexander Korda. It is based on the play with the same title by Marcel Pagnol. The film is a part of a trilogy which includes the films Fanny and César. The film was selected to be screened in the Cannes Classics section of the 2015 Cannes Film Festival. The restored film was also given a limited re-release in the United States by Janus Films on January 4, 2017, first premiering at Film Forum.

<i>Men of Tomorrow</i> 1932 film by Zoltan Korda, Leontine Sagan

Men of Tomorrow is a 1932 British drama film, directed by Zoltan Korda and Leontine Sagan, produced by Alexander Korda and written by Anthony Gibbs and Arthur Wimperis. It stars Maurice Braddell, Joan Gardner and Emlyn Williams and features Robert Donat's movie debut.

Wedding Rehearsal is a 1932 British romantic comedy film directed by Alexander Korda and starring Roland Young as a bachelor forced to seek a wife.

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London Films

London Films Productions is a British film and television production company founded in 1932 by Alexander Korda and from 1936 based at Denham Film Studios in Buckinghamshire, near London. The company's productions included The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), Things to Come (1936), Rembrandt (1936), and The Four Feathers (1939). The facility at Denham was taken over in 1939 by Rank and merged with Pinewood to form D & P Studios. The outbreak of war necessitated that The Thief of Bagdad (1940) was completed in California, although Korda's handful of American-made films still had Big Ben for their opening corporate logo.

Arthur Edeson American cinematographer

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References

  1. Korda, Michael (1999). Another life : a memoir of other people (1st ed.). New York: Random House. ISBN   0679456597.
  2. "The 13th Academy Awards (1941) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 12 August 2011.
  3. "The 14th Academy Awards (1942) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2011.
  4. "The 15th Academy Awards (1943) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2011.
  5. "The 35th Academy Awards (1963) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved 23 August 2011.