Virginia Fox

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Virginia Fox
Virginia Fox 1922.jpg
Fox in The Blacksmith (1922)
Born
Virginia Oglesby Fox

1906/1907
DiedOctober 14, 1982
Resting placeBuried next to her husband in Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery
NationalityAmerican
OccupationActress
Years active1915–1929
Spouse(s) Darryl F. Zanuck (1924–1979)
Children3, including Richard Darryl Zanuck
Relatives Dean Zanuck (grandson)

Virginia Fox Zanuck (born Virginia Oglesby Fox; 1906/1907 [1] – October 14, 1982) was an American actress who starred in many silent films of the 1910s and 1920s.

Contents

Life and career

Fox was born as Virginia Oglesby Fox in Wheeling, West Virginia (though her grave erroneously lists Charleston, West Virginia, as her place of birth), the daughter of Marie (née Oglesby) and Frederick Fox. [2]

While on vacation from boarding school, Fox traveled to visit a friend in Los Angeles. The two made a casual stop by the studio of Mack Sennett, where she was hired on the spot and made a bathing beauty in the studio's films. Fox went on to star as leading lady in many of the early films of Buster Keaton, including 1920's highly regarded Neighbors. [3]

In 1924 she married film producer Darryl F. Zanuck, with whom she had three children, Darrylin, Susan Marie, and Richard Darryl. Fox retired from acting, but was known as a behind-the-scenes influence on her husband's business decisions. The couple separated in 1956 over the studio mogul's affairs with other women, though they were never legally divorced; but according to Zanuck biographers, she cared for him at their home from the time he became mentally incapacitated in the early 1970s until his death in 1979.[ citation needed ] </ref>

Despite some Internet accounts to the contrary, Virginia Fox was not related to William Fox, whose name is preserved in the 20th Century Fox film studio, which Darryl Zanuck created and led for decades. William Fox founded Fox Studios, but had lost control of it by the time Zanuck acquired it and merged it into his own empire.[ citation needed ]

Death

Virginia Fox Zanuck's tomb in Westwood Memorial Park, Westwood, Los Angeles, California Virginia Fox Zanuck's tomb in Westwood Memorial Park.JPG
Virginia Fox Zanuck's tomb in Westwood Memorial Park, Westwood, Los Angeles, California

On October 14, 1982, Fox died of a lung infection complicated by emphysema at her home in Santa Monica, California after having been sick for about a year. She was 75. [1] She was buried near Darryl Zanuck at the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Westwood, Los Angeles. [4]

Filmography

YearFilmRoleNotes
1915 A Submarine Pirate
1920 Down on the Farm uncredited
Neighbors The Bride
1921 The Haunted House Bank President's Daughter
Hard Luck Virginia
The Goat Chief's daughter
The Playhouse TwinUncredited
1922 The Paleface Indian MaidenUncredited
Cops Mayor's Daughter
1922 The Blacksmith Horsewoman
The Electric House GirlUncredited
1923 The Love Nest The Girl
1926 The Caveman Party Girl

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References

  1. 1 2 "V. Zanuck, widow of film tycoon". Chicago Tribune. October 15, 1982. p. 8. Retrieved November 7, 2020 via Newspapers.com.
  2. Harris, Marlys J. (1989). The Zanucks of Hollywood: the dark legacy of an American dynasty . Crown Publishers. ISBN   9780517570203.
  3. VIRGINIA F. ZANUCK, SILENT MOVIE STAR, Obituary, The New York Times, Oct. 15, 1982, https://www.nytimes.com/1982/10/15/obituaries/virginia-f-zanuck-silent-movie-star.html
  4. The New York Times