Viscount Southwell

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Viscountcy Southwell
Coronet of a British Viscount.svg
Southwell Escutcheon.png
Escutcheon: Argent three Cinquefoils pierced Gules charged on each leaf with an Annulet of the field; Crest: A Demi Indian Goat Argent armed and eared Gules ducally gorged Or and charged on the body with three Annulets in bend also Gules; Supporters: On either side an Indian Goat Argent ducally collared chained and charged on the body with three Annulets Gules [1]
Creation date18 July 1776
Monarch George III
Peerage Peerage of Ireland
First holder Thomas, 3rd Baron Southwell
Present holderRichard Andrew Pyers Southwell, 8th Viscount
Heir apparentThe Hon. Charles Anthony John Southwell
Remainder toHeirs male of the first viscount's body, lawfully begotten
Subsidiary titlesBaron Southwell
Baronet
Former seat(s)Nec Male Notus Eques (Not an unknown knight)
MottoDeo Favente

Viscount Southwell ( /ˈsʌðəl/ ), of Castle Mattress in the County of Limerick, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. [2] It was created in 1776 for Thomas Southwell, 3rd Baron Southwell. The Southwell family descends from Thomas Southwell. In 1662 he was created a Baronet, of Castle Mattress in the County of Limerick, in the Baronetage of Ireland. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He represented Limerick County in the Irish Parliament. In 1717 he was created Baron Southwell, of Castle Mattress, in the County of Limerick, in the Peerage of Ireland. [3] His grandson was the aforementioned third Baron, who was elevated to a viscountcy in 1776. Before succeeded in the barony he had represented Enniscorthy in the Irish House of Commons. His great-grandson, the fourth Viscount, served as Lord Lieutenant of County Leitrim between 1872 and 1878. As of 2019 the titles are held by his great-great-grandson, the eighth Viscount, who succeeded his father in that year.

Contents

Southwell Baronets, of Castle Mattress (1662)

Barons Southwell (1717)

Viscounts Southwell (1776)

5th Viscount, by Lafayette, 1900. James Lafayette, Lafayette Ltd., 1900, photo of Arthur R. P., 5th Viscount Southwell (1872-1944).jpg
5th Viscount, by Lafayette, 1900.

The heir presumptive and last in line to the titles is the present holder's younger brother, the Hon. Charles Anthony John Southwell (born 1962).

Ancestry

(ancestors of 7th Viscount)

Notes

  1. "Southwell, Viscount (I, 1776)".
  2. "No. 11679". The London Gazette . 29 June 1776. p. 1.
  3. "No. 5565". The London Gazette . 17 August 1717. p. 1.

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