Volcán Tajumulco

Last updated
Volcán Tajumulco
Tajumulco Volcano.JPG
Crater of the Volcán Tajumulco
Highest point
Elevation 4,220 m (13,850 ft)
Prominence 3,980 m (13,060 ft)
Isolation 722 kilometres (449 mi)
Listing
Coordinates 15°02′37″N91°54′12″W / 15.043685°N 91.903308°W / 15.043685; -91.903308 Coordinates: 15°02′37″N91°54′12″W / 15.043685°N 91.903308°W / 15.043685; -91.903308
Geography
Relief map of Guatemala.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Volcán Tajumulco
Location in Guatemala
Location San Marcos, Guatemala
Parent range Sierra Madre
Geology
Mountain type Stratovolcano
Volcanic arc/belt Central America Volcanic Arc
Last eruption Unknown

Volcán Tajumulco is a large stratovolcano in the department of San Marcos in western Guatemala. It is the highest mountain in Central America at 4,202 metres (13,786 ft). It is part of the mountain range of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, which begins in Mexico's southernmost state of Chiapas. [1]

Stratovolcano Tall, conical volcano built up by many layers of hardened lava and other ejecta

A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano, is a conical volcano built up by many layers (strata) of hardened lava, tephra, pumice and ash. Unlike shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes are characterized by a steep profile with a summit crater and periodic intervals of explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions, although some have collapsed summit craters called calderas. The lava flowing from stratovolcanoes typically cools and hardens before spreading far, due to high viscosity. The magma forming this lava is often felsic, having high-to-intermediate levels of silica, with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma. Extensive felsic lava flows are uncommon, but have travelled as far as 15 km (9.3 mi).

San Marcos Department Department in San Marcos, Guatemala

San Marcos is a department in northwestern Guatemala, on the Pacific Ocean and along the western Guatemala-Mexico border.

Guatemala Republic in Central America

Guatemala, officially the Republic of Guatemala, is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, Belize and the Caribbean to the northeast, Honduras to the east, El Salvador to the southeast and the Pacific Ocean to the south. With an estimated population of around 16.6 million, it is the most populated country in Central America. Guatemala is a representative democracy; its capital and largest city is Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, also known as Guatemala City.

Contents

Description

Tajumulco is composed of andesitic-dacitic lavas on the top of a large escarpment of uncertain origin. It has two summits, one of which has a crater 50–70 metres (160–230 ft) wide. A lava flow from the north-western summit descends into a steep valley on the same side of the volcano. [2]

The volcano's eruptive history is unclear and the date of its last eruption is unknown. Reports from the 18th and early 19th century claim to record eruptions but these are considered unlikely. [2]

The region around Tajumulco is relatively sparsely populated. [2] The nearest town is San Marcos, located 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) to the south-east. [1] Although it is infrequently visited, [2] the volcano can be climbed in about five hours from the hamlet of Tuichán. Views are variable as the area is frequently covered in mist and cloud, with conditions at their least favorable between April and September. [3]

San Marcos, Guatemala Place in San Marcos, Guatemala

San Marcos (elevation: 7,868 feet is a city and municipality in Guatemala. It is the capital of the department of San Marcos. The municipality has a population of approximately 45,000.

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Tajumulco Volcano." Britannica Library, Encyclopædia Britannica, 27 February 2012. Accessed 22 April 2017
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Tajumulco". Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History Global Volcanism Program. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  3. Stewart, Iain (2009). The Rough Guide to Guatemala. Rough Guides Limited. p. 477. ISBN   978-1-84836-017-4.

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References

  • Encyclopædia Britannica Online. "Tajumulco Volcano". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Retrieved 2011-01-14.
  • INSIVUMEH. "Volcanes de Guatemala" (in Spanish). Guatemala City: Instituto Nacional de Sismología, Vulcanología, Meteorologíá e Hidrologíá (INSIVUMEH) - Ministerio de Comunicaciones, Infraestructura y Vivienda. Retrieved 2011-01-14.
  • Global Volcanism Program. "Tajumulco". Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2011-01-14.