W's Tragedy

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W's Tragedy
W's Tragedy cover.jpeg
Blu-ray Disc cover
Directed by Shinichirō Sawai
Written by
Starring
Music by Joe Hisaishi [1]
Distributed by Toei Company
Release date
December 15, 1984
Running time
108 minutes
CountryJapan
LanguageJapanese

W's Tragedy (Wの悲劇, Daburyū no Higeki) is a 1984 Japanese film directed by Shinichirō Sawai, based on the novel by Shizuko Natsuki (published in English under the title Murder at Mt. Fuji ). At the 9th Japan Academy Prize it won three awards and received three other nominations.

Contents

Plot

Natsuki's original book W no Higeki, the story of a rich family torn apart by the murder of their patriarch, and their heiress being accused of the crime, becomes a play and is acted out by a troupe of actors in Osaka. The role of the heroine is contended for by young Shizuka Mita (Yakushimaru), who dreams of fame and fortune. Shizuka is taken under the wing of famous actress Sho Hatori (Y. Mita), whose rich patron died in her arms one night, and who agrees to let Shizuka stand in for her. As the play is acted out, Shizuka realizes that many scenes in the play begin to have parallels with real life...

The film takes the form of a story within a story, in which the original book's characters are acted out by the film's characters.

Cast

Theme song

This song has also been covered by Yumi Matsutoya, Yūko Andō, Akina Nakamori and Ken Hirai, the latter version being used for the 2012 iteration of the book's story into a TV drama.

Awards and nominations

9th Japan Academy Prize [2]

27th Blue Ribbon Awards [3]

10th Hochi Film Award [4]

7th Yokohama Film Festival [5]

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References

  1. W's Tragedy (1984) - Full cast and crew
  2. 第9回 日本アカデミー賞 (in Japanese). Japan Academy Prize . Retrieved 2009-11-10.
  3. ブルーリボン賞ヒストリー (in Japanese). Cinema Hochi. Archived from the original on 2009-02-07. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  4. 報知映画賞ヒストリー (in Japanese). Cinema Hochi. Archived from the original on 2013-06-27. Retrieved 2009-11-10.
  5. 1985年度 日本映画ベストテン (in Japanese). Yokohama Film Festival. Archived from the original on 2010-03-06. Retrieved 2009-11-10.