W. Durant Berry

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W. Durant Berry
W Durant Berry.jpg
Berry pictured in The Cincinnatian 1895, Cincinnati yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1870-09-03)September 3, 1870
Warren, Massachusetts
DiedJuly 9, 1953(1953-07-09) (aged 82)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1891–1893 Centre
1894–1895 Cincinnati
Head coaching record
Overall19–7

Walter Durant Berry (September 3, 1870 – July 9, 1953) [1] was an American football coach. He was the first head football coach at the University of Cincinnati, serving from 1894 to 1895 and compiling a record of 6–6. [2] Berry later worked as a doctor in New England. In 1903, he married Helen Warren Upham.

Berry had previously been a head football coach at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky from 1981 to 1893, compiling a record of 13 wins and 1 loss. [3] He died in 1953. [4]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Centre (Independent)(1891–1893)
1891 Centre4–0
1892 Centre 6–0
1893 Centre 4–1
Centre:13–1
Cincinnati (Independent)(1894–1895)
1894 Cincinnati 3–3
1895 Cincinnati 3–3
Cincinnati:6–6
Total:19–7

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References

  1. W. Durant Berry Biographical Information. Family Search: Mormon Database. Retrieved on March 5, 2016.
  2. W. Durant Berry. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on March 5, 2016
  3. Grace, Kevin (2003). Cincinnati Hoops. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN   9780738532011 . Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  4. "United States, Veterans Administration Master Index, 1917-1940," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP8D-S82P  : 5 December 2018), Walter D Berry, 12 Oct 1917; citing Military Service, NARA microfilm publication 76193916 (St. Louis: National Archives and Records Administration, 1985), various roll numbers.