Wagner Ice Piedmont

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Wagner Ice Piedmont ( 69°28′S72°38′W / 69.467°S 72.633°W / -69.467; -72.633 Coordinates: 69°28′S72°38′W / 69.467°S 72.633°W / -69.467; -72.633 ) is an ice piedmont, 9 nautical miles (17 km) long in a NW-SE direction and 4 nautical miles (7 km) wide, overlying the southwest part of Rothschild Island.

Observed and photographed from the air by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS), 1939–41. Mapped from air photos taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48, by Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1960.

Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for Richard Wagner (1813–1883), German composer.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Wagner Ice Piedmont".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

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