Walker Brooke

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Walker Brooke
WBrooke.jpg
Deputy from Mississippi
to the Provisional Congress
of the Confederate States
In office
February 4, 1861 February 17, 1862
Preceded byNew constituency
Succeeded byConstituency abolished
United States Senator
from Mississippi
In office
February 18, 1852 March 3, 1853
Servingwith
Preceded by Henry S. Foote
Succeeded by Albert G. Brown
Member of the Mississippi Senate
In office
1850–1852
Member of the Mississippi House of Representatives
In office
1848
Personal details
Born(1813-12-25)December 25, 1813
Clarke County, Virginia
DiedFebruary 18, 1869(1869-02-18) (aged 55)
Vicksburg, Mississippi
Resting place Cedar Hill Cemetery,
Vicksburg, Mississippi
Political party Democratic
Other political
affiliations
Whig
Alma mater University of Virginia

Walker Brooke (December 25, 1813 – February 18, 1869) was an American politician who served as a Deputy from Mississippi to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States from 1861 to 1862. He was also a U.S. Senator from 1852 to 1853, representing the state of Mississippi.

Mississippi U.S. state in the United States

Mississippi is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Mississippi is the 32nd largest and 34th-most populous of the 50 United States. Mississippi is bordered to the north by Tennessee, to the east by Alabama, to the south by the Gulf of Mexico, to the southwest by Louisiana, and to the northwest by Arkansas. Mississippi's western boundary is largely defined by the Mississippi River. Jackson is both the state's capital and largest city. Greater Jackson, with an estimated population of 580,166 in 2018, is the most populous metropolitan area in Mississippi and the 95th-most populous in the United States.

Provisional Congress of the Confederate States historic legislature of the provisional government of the Confederate States

The Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, also known as the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America, was a congress of deputies and delegates called together from the Southern States which became the governing body of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America (CSA) from February 4, 1861, to February 17, 1862. It sat in Montgomery, Alabama, until May 20, 1861, when it adjourned to meet in Richmond, Virginia, on July 20, 1861. It added new members as other states seceded and directed the election on November 6, 1861, at which a permanent government was elected.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress which, along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

Contents

Biography

Born on December 25, 1813, in Clarke County, Virginia, Walker Brooke was the son of Humphrey Brooke and Sarah Walker Page. He attended the public schools in Richmond, Virginia and Georgetown, D.C. He graduated from the University of Virginia at Charlottesville in 1835, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1838 and commenced practice in Lexington, Mississippi. He was a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives in 1848 and was a member of the Mississippi Senate in 1850 and 1852.

Clarke County, Virginia County in Virginia

Clarke County is a county in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,034. Its county seat is Berryville. Clarke County is included in the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Richmond, Virginia Capital of Virginia

Richmond is the capital city of the Commonwealth of Virginia. It is the center of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and the Greater Richmond Region. Richmond was incorporated in 1742 and has been an independent city since 1871.

University of Virginia University in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States

The University of Virginia is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was founded in 1819 by Declaration of Independence author Thomas Jefferson. It is the flagship university of Virginia and home to Jefferson's Academical Village, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. UVA is known for its historic foundations, student-run honor code, and secret societies.

Brooke was elected as a Whig to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Henry S. Foote and served from February 18, 1852, to March 3, 1853; he was not a candidate for reelection and resumed the practice of law. In 1857 he moved to Vicksburg and continued the practice of law; he was a delegate to the constitutional convention in 1861 and became affiliated with the Democratic Party that year. He was elected a member of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States from Mississippi in 1861 and served one year; he was then appointed a member of the permanent military court of the Confederate States.

The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States. Alongside the Democratic Party, it was one of the two major parties in the United States during the late 1830s, the 1840s, and the early 1850s, part of the period some scholars describe as the Second Party System. Four presidents aligned with the party for at least part of their respective terms. Other influential party leaders include Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, William Seward, John J. Crittenden, and Truman Smith.

Henry S. Foote American politician

Henry Stuart Foote was a United States Senator from Mississippi and the chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations from 1847 to 1852. He was a Unionist Governor of Mississippi from 1852 to 1854, and an American Party supporter in California. During the American Civil War, he served in the First and Second Confederate Congresses. A practicing attorney, he published two memoirs related to the Civil War years, as well as a book on Texas prior to its annexation, and a postwar book on the legal profession and courts in the South.

Vicksburg, Mississippi City in Mississippi, United States

Vicksburg is a historic American city, located on a high bluff on the east bank of the Mississippi River across from Louisiana.

See also

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

Find a Grave is an American website that allows the public to search and add to an online database of cemetery records. It is owned by Ancestry.com.

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