Walter A. Brown

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Walter A. Brown
Walter A. Brown, Boston Celtics, 1960.jpg
Brown in 1960
Born(1905-02-10)February 10, 1905
DiedSeptember 7, 1964(1964-09-07) (aged 59)
Nationality United States
Occupation Basketball team owner
Ice hockey coach and team owner
Known for Boston Celtics
Honors Hockey Hall of Fame (1962)
Basketball Hall of Fame (1965)
IIHF Hall of Fame (1997)

Walter A. Brown (February 10, 1905 – September 7, 1964) was the founder and original owner [1] of the Boston Celtics as well as an important figure in the development of ice hockey in the United States.

Boston Celtics professional basketball team in the National Basketball Association

The Boston Celtics are an American professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Celtics compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Eastern Conference Atlantic Division. Founded in 1946 as one of the league's original eight teams, the team play their home games at TD Garden, which they share with the National Hockey League (NHL)'s Boston Bruins. The Celtics are one of the most successful teams in NBA history; the franchise has won the most championships in the NBA with 17, accounting for 23.9 percent of all NBA championships since the league's founding.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually consisting of six players each: one goaltender, and five players who skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team.

Contents

Life

He was born in Hopkinton, Massachusetts and attended Boston Latin from 1922 to 1923 and Phillips Exeter Academy from 1923 to 1926. After succeeding his father, George V. Brown, as manager of the Boston Garden, he stated his belief that, "Boston should have a basketball team." Taking a mortgage out on his home, he founded the Celtics in 1945. He then helped to found the Basketball Association of America in 1946, and was instrumental in merging the BAA and the National Basketball League into the National Basketball Association in 1949. He oversaw the transformation of the Celtics into a dynasty, as they won six championships in the seven years before his death. He is buried in St. John the Evangelist Cemetery in Hopkinton, Massachusetts.

Hopkinton, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Hopkinton is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, less than 30 miles (48 km) west of Boston. The town is best known as the starting point of the Boston Marathon, held annually on Patriots' Day in April, and as the headquarters for the enterprise-oriented Dell EMC. At the 2010 census, the town had a population of 14,925. The US Census recognizes a village within the town known as Woodville, reporting a population of 2,550.

Boston Latin School first public school in the United States

The Boston Latin School is a first build public exam school in Boston, Massachusetts. It was established on April 23, 1635, making it both the oldest school in America and the first public school in the United States. The Public Latin School was a bastion for educating the sons of the Boston "Brahmin" elite, resulting in the school claiming many prominent New Englanders as alumni. Its curriculum follows that of the 18th century Latin school movement, which holds the classics to be the basis of an educated mind. Four years of Latin are mandatory for all pupils who enter the school in the 7th grade, three years for those who enter in the 9th. In 2007, the school was named one of the top 20 high schools in the United States by U.S. News & World Report magazine. It was named a 2011 "Blue Ribbon School of Excellence", the Department of Education's highest award. As of 2018, it is listed under the "gold medal" list, ranking 48 out of the top 100 high schools in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.

Phillips Exeter Academy American private college preparatory school

Phillips Exeter Academy is a coeducational independent school for boarding and day students in grades 9 through 12, and offers a postgraduate program. Located in Exeter, New Hampshire, it is one of the oldest secondary schools in the United States. Exeter is based on the Harkness education system, a conference format of student interaction with minimal teacher involvement. It has the largest endowment of any New England boarding school, which as of June 30, 2017, was valued at $1.25 billion. On January 25, 2019, William K. Rawson was appointed by the Academy's trustees as the 16th Principal Instructor. He is the 4th alumnus of Exeter to serve as Principal Instructor, after Gideon Lane Soule (1838–1873), Harlan Amen, and William Saltonstall (1946–1963).

Brown was the President of the Boston Athletic Association from 1941 to 1964. [2] In 1951 during the height of the Korean War, Brown denied Koreans entry into the Boston Marathon. He stated: "While American soldiers are fighting and dying in Korea, every Korean should be fighting to protect his country instead of training for marathons. As long as the war continues there, we positively will not accept Korean entries for our race on April 19." [3]

The Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) is a non-profit, running-focused, organized sports association for the Greater Boston area. The B.A.A. hosts such events as the Boston Marathon, the B.A.A. 5K, the B.A.A. 10K, the B.A.A. Half Marathon, the B.A.A. Distance Medley, and the B.A.A. Invitational Mile.

Korean War 1950–1953 war between North Korea and South Korea

The Korean War was a war between North Korea and South Korea. The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following a series of clashes along the border.

Boston Marathon marathon running race held in Boston, Untied States

The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon race hosted by several cities in greater Boston in eastern Massachusetts, United States. It is always held on Patriots' Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897, the event was inspired by the success of the first marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics. The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. It is one of six World Marathon Majors. Its course runs from Hopkinton in southern Middlesex County to Copley Square in Boston.

Hockey

Brown also played an important role in the development of hockey; he coached the amateur Boston Olympics to five Eastern Hockey League championships and guided the USA to its first gold medal in the Ice Hockey World Championships in 1933. In February 1940, Brown and eight other arena managers organized the Ice Capades. [4] In 1951, he bought the financially strapped Boston Bruins; he had been the Bruins' landlord since becoming the Garden's manager. He served as the president of the International Ice Hockey Federation from 1954 to 1957.

The Boston Olympics are a defunct farm team for the Boston Bruins. They began play during the 1940–41 Eastern Amateur Hockey League season. The Olympics were often referred to by the shortened name the ‘Pics and the franchise remained active until the 1951–52 season.

Eastern Hockey League

The Eastern Hockey League was a minor professional United States ice hockey league.

Gold medal medal, generally awarded for first place or a high achievement

A gold medal is a medal awarded for highest achievement in a non-military field. Its name derives from the use of at least a fraction of gold in form of plating or alloying in its manufacture.

Honors

The Boston Celtics retired uniform number "1" in Brown's honor in 1964. Celtics1.png
The Boston Celtics retired uniform number "1" in Brown's honor in 1964.

Brown was honored by having the NBA championship trophy named after him after he died in 1964.

The Larry O'Brien NBA Championship Trophy is the championship trophy awarded annually by the National Basketball Association (NBA) to the winner of the NBA Finals. The name of the trophy was the Walter A. Brown Trophy until 1984.

He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1965, and IIHF Hall of Fame in 1997, its inaugural year. [5] [6]

Hockey Hall of Fame award

The Hockey Hall of Fame is an ice hockey museum located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dedicated to the history of ice hockey, it is a museum and a hall of fame. It holds exhibits about players, teams, National Hockey League (NHL) records, memorabilia and NHL trophies, including the Stanley Cup. Founded in Kingston, Ontario, the Hockey Hall of Fame was established in 1943 under the leadership of James T. Sutherland. The first class of honoured members was inducted in 1945, before the Hall of Fame had a permanent location. It moved to Toronto in 1958 after the NHL withdrew its support for the International Hockey Hall of Fame in Kingston, Ontario. Its first permanent building opened at Exhibition Place in 1961. The hall was relocated in 1993, and is now in downtown Toronto, inside Brookfield Place, and a historic Bank of Montreal building.

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Professional sports hall of fame in Springfield, Massachusetts

The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame is an American history museum and hall of fame, located at 1000 Hall of Fame Avenue in Springfield, Massachusetts. It serves as the sport's most complete library, in addition to promoting and preserving the history of basketball. Dedicated to Canadian-American physician and inventor of the sport James Naismith, it was opened and inducted its first class in 1959.

IIHF Hall of Fame award

The IIHF Hall of Fame is a hall of fame operated by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). It was founded in 1997, and has resided at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto since 1998. Prior to 1997, the IIHF housed exhibits at the International Hockey Hall of Fame in Kingston, Ontario. Inductions are made annually at the medal presentation day of the Ice Hockey World Championships. As of 2019, the IIHF has inducted 224 members.

See also

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References

  1. "Significant Owners: Walter A. Brown (Celtics)" at Real Clear Sports
  2. Pave, Marvin (April 17, 2008). "Legacy on the line". Boston Globe.
  3. Sport: Banned in Boston. Time, February 12, 1951.
  4. Hamilton, F. F. , Jr. (1974). Ice Capades "years of entertainment". Washington, DC: Penchant Publishing Company, Ltd.
  5. "Hockey Hall of Fame" . Retrieved December 2, 2007.
  6. "Basketball Hall of Fame". Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved December 2, 2007.
Preceded by
George V. Brown
General Manager of the Boston Garden
1937–64
Succeeded by
Edward J. Powers
Preceded by
First
President of the Boston Celtics
1946–63
Succeeded by
Louis Pieri
Preceded by
First
Boston Celtics general manager
1946–1951
Succeeded by
Red Auerbach
Preceded by
Boston Garden-Arena Corporation
Boston Celtics principal owner
1950–1964
Succeeded by
Louis Pieri and Marjorie Brown
Preceded by
Weston Adams, Sr.
President of the Boston Bruins
1951–64
Succeeded by
Weston Adams, Sr.
Preceded by
Fritz Kraatz
President of the IIHF
1954–57
Succeeded by
Bunny Ahearne