Walter Forde

Last updated
Walter Forde
Born
Thomas Seymour Woolford

(1898-04-21)21 April 1898
London, England
Died7 January 1984(1984-01-07) (aged 85)
Los Angeles, California, US
Occupation
  • Actor
  • Writer
  • Film director

Walter Forde (born Thomas Seymour Woolford, 21 April 1898 7 January 1984) [1] was a British actor, screenwriter and director. [2] Born in Lambeth, south London in 1898, he directed over fifty films between 1919 from the silent era through to 1949 in the sound era. [1] [3] He died in Los Angeles, California in 1984.

Contents

Forde was the son of the music hall comedian Tom Seymour. During the 1920s, he was a silent film comedian, acting in a series of shorts before shifting into directing feature films. Emerging as an established film director in the 1930s, he directed films for Gainsborough Pictures and Ealing Studios.

Filmography

Actor

Director

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References

  1. 1 2 "Walter Forde". IMDb.
  2. "Walter Forde". BFI. Archived from the original on 2012-07-22.
  3. "BFI Screenonline: Forde, Walter (1898-1984) Biography". screenonline.org.uk.

Bibliography