Walter Winterbottom

Last updated

Sir Walter Winterbottom
CBE
Personal information
Full name Walter Winterbottom
Date of birth(1913-03-31)31 March 1913
Place of birth Oldham, England
Date of death 16 February 2002(2002-02-16) (aged 88)
Place of death Guildford, England
Position(s) Half back
Youth career
Manchester United
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1936–1938 Manchester United 26 (0)
Teams managed
1946–1962 England
1952 Great Britain
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Sir Walter Winterbottom CBE (31 March 1913 – 16 February 2002) was the first manager of the England football team (1946–1962) and FA Director of Coaching. He resigned from the FA in 1962 to become General Secretary of the Central Council of Physical Recreation (CCPR) and was appointed as the first Director of the Sports Council in 1965. He was knighted for his services to sport in 1978 when he retired. The Football Association marked the 100th anniversary of Winterbottom's birth by commissioning a bust which was unveiled by Roy Hodgson at St Georges Park on 23 April 2013 in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the development of English football.

Contents

Walter Winterbottom Walter Winterbottom.jpg
Walter Winterbottom
Roy Hodgson and Winterbottom biographer Graham Morse Roy Hodgson and Graham.jpg
Roy Hodgson and Winterbottom biographer Graham Morse

Early years

Born in Oldham, Lancashire, Walter Winterbottom was the only son of James Winterbottom, a ring frame fitter in a textile machine works. [1] At the age of 12 he was awarded a scholarship to Oldham High School where he excelled. He won a bursary to Chester Diocesan Teachers Training College, [1] graduating as the top student in 1933 and took a teaching post at the Alexandra Road School, Oldham. Whilst teaching he played football for Royton Amateurs and then Mossley [1] where he was spotted by Manchester United. He signed for United as a part-time professional in 1936 but continued teaching. [1] In his first season (1936/37) at Manchester United he showed great promise, playing 21 first team League games and 2 FA cup games, appearing as wing half and centre half. But in the following two seasons he made only 4 first team appearances. [1] and 41 Central League appearances, his playing career effectively ended by a spinal disease, later diagnosed as ankylosing spondylitis. [1] Whilst still playing for Manchester United he left his teaching position to study at Carnegie College of Physical Education, Leeds. On graduating he was appointed as a lecturer. [1]

During World War II Winterbottom served as an officer in the Royal Air Force, reaching the rank of wing commander and working at the Air Ministry with overall responsibility for training PE instructors at home and overseas. He was also a guest player with Chelsea [1] and ran coaching courses for the FA at grammar schools in London. In 1946 Stanley Rous, who was the secretary of The Football Association, persuaded the FA council to appoint Winterbottom as The FA's first Director of Coaching and suggested he take on the additional responsibility of being the first England team manager. [1]

England team manager

Walter Winterbottom has the distinction of being England's first, youngest and longest serving England team manager; he is also the only England manager to have had no previous professional managerial experience. In all matches in which he was in charge, England played 139, won 78, drew 33, and lost 28; goals for 383, against 196. At home England lost six matches in sixteen years. England won the British championship in thirteen out of his sixteen seasons (seven times outright and six times sharing top place). In the World Cup tournament England qualified on all four occasions, reaching the quarter finals twice, playing 28 matches, winning 15, drawing 7 and losing 6; goals for 75 against 35 (including World Cup qualifying matches). [2]

Although he had coaching and managerial responsibilities, Winterbottom never had the power to pick his own team (it was chosen by a selection committee). [1] Over time his technical knowledge increasingly influenced selectors. Finally, prior to Alf Ramsey's arrival in 1962, he convinced the FA that the team manager must have sole control of selection. [3] During his time Winterbottom repeatedly warned the English football establishment that countries in Continental Europe and South America were overtaking England and that English football had to change. His sixteen years as England team manager helped greatly in creating a modern and competitive national team and four years after his departure in 1966 England won the World Cup. His innovations included the introduction of England B, Under 23, youth and schoolboy teams [4] providing players with continuity and experience in international football before being selected for the full England team.

Notable victories during his era were 10—0 away to Portugal in 1947, 4—0 away to Italy in 1948, 3—1 at home to recently crowned World Champions West Germany in 1954 after the 4—2 at home to Brazil in 1956 and 9—3 at home to Scotland in 1961. Notable defeats were losing 2–0 to the Republic of Ireland at Goodison Park, losing 1—0 to the USA in the 1950 World Cup and 6—3 at home to Hungary in 1953 when England lost their unbeaten home record to a foreign team at Wembley, followed by a 7—1 away defeat to the same team in 1954.

Also while he was manager, England visited Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Denmark, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, the Soviet Union, United States and Uruguay for the first time.

FIFA World Cup record

Winterbottom led England to four consecutive World Cup finals, a record subsequently equalled only by Helmut Schön of West Germany. England entered the World Cup for the first time in 1950, qualifying for the tournament in Brazil by winning the British Home Championship. England had never before played in South America. They beat Chile by 2—0 but lost 1—0 to the USA and 1—0 to Spain to be eliminated in the first round. Winterbottom again led England to qualification in Switzerland in 1954 by winning the British Home championship. A 4—4 draw against Belgium and a 2—0 victory against Switzerland took them to the quarter finals where they were beaten 4—2 by the defending champions, Uruguay.

England qualified for the 1958 FIFA World Cup in Sweden with wins over the Republic of Ireland and Denmark, with a team that had lost only once in 17 games. Three months before the tournament began the Munich air disaster robbed the team of key players from Manchester United: Roger Byrne, Tommy Taylor and Duncan Edwards died. England drew against the USSR, Brazil and Austria but lost to the Soviet Union in a playoff for a quarter-final place.

Winterbottom again led his team to qualification for the 1962 World Cup in Chile with wins over Portugal and Luxembourg. After progressing from their group on goal average, England reached the quarter-finals but were beaten 3—1 by the eventual winners, Brazil.

FA Director of Coaching

Although Winterbottom is best known as the England team manager, it is in coaching that he made important contributions to the development of English football. He made no secret of his belief that his job as Director of Coaching was the more important of his two roles at the FA. [5]

When he joined the FA in 1946, club directors, managers and players were cynical about the need for coaching [6] but Winterbottom had a passion for coaching and a vision of how it should develop. He soon created a national coaching scheme with summer residential courses at Lilleshall, Shropshire, and persuaded some of his international players to take the courses that led to exams for the FA preliminary and full coaching badges. This gave the scheme credibility. They developed their teaching skills by coaching in schools and then moved into part-time coaching positions in junior clubs. He gathered around him a cadre of young FA staff coaches: men like Bill Nicholson, Don Howe, Alan Brown, Ron Greenwood, Dave Sexton, Malcolm Allison, Joe Mercer, Vic Buckingham, Jimmy Hill and Bobby Robson. Over time a new breed of managers emerged in the League clubs and began to change attitudes to coaching.

Winterbottom's courses were expanded to include professional players, referees, schoolmasters, club trainers, schoolboys and youth leaders. In addition to Lilleshall they were held at Loughborough College, Carnegie College, Bisham Abbey and Birmingham University. In 1947 three hundred had taken the full coaching award and the numbers of qualified coaches grew each year.

The courses attracted international participation and praise. Winterbottom was regarded by many as a leading technical thinker and exponent of association football, of his generation, in the world and lectured internationally.

He inspired a new generation of managers, most notably Ron Greenwood and Bobby Robson, who graduated through every level of coaching, both eventually becoming England team manager.

Criticism

In assessing Winterbottom's tenure as England manager, Goldblatt writes that "[Winterbottom] introduced a measure of tactical thinking and discussion to the England squad, though his inability to anticipate or learn significantly from the Hungarian debacle suggests that his grasp of tactics and communication with the players was limited." [7] William Baker writes that Winterbottom, because of his "upper-class origins [sic]", could not "effectively instruct, much less inspire, working-class footballers." [8] Football journalist Brian Glanville said in an interview: "I got on very well with Walter Winterbottom, but he was a rotten manager." [9]

Publishing

Winterbottom was also responsible for the publishing at the FA. The first coaching bulletin was launched in 1946 and this became the FA Bulletin and then the FA News. The FA Year Book was introduced in 1948 along with the FA Book for Boys annual. [10] The first coaching films and film strips followed in 1950.

An important landmark was the publication of Winterbottom's book, Soccer Coaching, the first modern soccer coaching manual. This was followed by three more books, Skilful Soccer, Modern Soccer and Training for Soccer.

Sports administrator

In 1962 Winterbottom resigned from the FA and took up an appointment as General Secretary of the Central Council of Physical Recreation [4] and two years later became the Director of the newly formed Sports Council. He stepped onto the wider stage of sport and emerged to have a profound effect on sport in Britain during the second half of the twentieth century. [11]

Central Council of Physical Recreation

At the Central Council of Physical Education (CCPR) Winterbottom worked to provide coaches and better facilities for sports governing bodies. He soon became involved in the ongoing political debate about the recommendations of the 1960 Report of the Wolfenden Committee on Sport, which had recommended the establishment of a Sports Council responsible for distributing government money to sport. He was in favour but the CCPR was divided on the issue. In 1965 the Government under set up a Sports Council and Winterbottom was seconded to become the first Director of the Sports Council [1] with Denis Howell as his chairman.

Sports Council

Winterbottom believed that participation in a sport played a much more important role in society that was generally accepted. For 16 years he battled to win significantly more investment in sport from national and local government to support a Sport for All campaign. Despite a harsh economic climate great progress was made in providing new facilities. In ten years 499 sports centres were built and 524 new swimming pools. [12] Under his leadership sports governing bodies were helped to develop more professional organisations and provide more coaches. He conceived the idea of the Sports Aid Foundation, raising money from industry to back young elite sportsmen and women with Olympic medal winning chances.

He was a member of the Council of Europe and Chairman of the Committee for the Development of Sport and was influential in the acceptance of the Sport For All concept by Canada and UNESCO. [12]

Later life

In 1978, after reaching the age of 65, Winterbottom retired from the Sports Council and was knighted for his services to sport. He became an advisor to the British government on ways in which British manufacturers of sports equipment could work with foreign firms. In 1979, he visited Australia and New Zealand to help their governments to support sport in the community.

He was head of the FIFA Technical Studies Group for the World Cup in 1966, 1970, 1974, 1978 and a member in 1982. [13] In 1985 The Winterbottom Report, an FA enquiry into artificial playing surfaces was published and in 1987–89 he was a member of the Football League enquiry into artificial pitches. [14]

He died in the Royal Surrey Hospital after an operation for cancer on 16 February 2002. He was 88 years old. A memorial service was held at St. Nicolas Church, Cranleigh, Surrey on 1 March 2002.

Managerial statistics

TeamNatFromToRecord
GWDLGFGA+/–Win %
England Flag of England.svg September 1946July 1962139783328385195+190056.12

England matches under Winterbottom

England's goal tally first.

England Match Record 1946–1962
#DateVenueOpponentResultCompetition
128 September 1946 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, Belfast Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 7–2 1946–47 British Home Championship
230 September 1946 Flag of Ireland.svg Dalymount Park, Dublin Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 1–0International Match
313 November 1946 Flag of England.svg Maine Road, Manchester Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 3–0 1946–47 British Home Championship
427 November 1946 Flag of England.svg Leeds Road, Huddersfield Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 8–2International Match
512 April 1947 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, London Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–1 1946–47 British Home Championship
63 May 1947 Flag of England.svg Highbury, London Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg  France 3–0International Match
718 May 1947 Flag of Switzerland.svg Hardturm, Zürich Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 0–11947 European tour
825 May 1947 Flag of Portugal.svg Estádio Nacional, Lisbon Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 10–0
929 September 1947 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Heysel Stadium, Brussels Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5–2International Match
1018 October 1947 Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg Ninian Park, Cardiff Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 3–0 1947–48 British Home Championship
115 November 1947 Flag of England.svg Goodison Park, Liverpool Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 2–2 1947–48 British Home Championship
1219 November 1947 Flag of England.svg Highbury, LondonFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 4–2International Match
1310 May 1948 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, Glasgow Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–0 1947–48 British Home Championship
1416 May 1948 Flag of Italy.svg Stadio Comunale, Turin Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 4–0International Match
1526 September 1948 Flag of Denmark.svg Idrætspark, Copenhagen Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 0–0International Match
169 October 1948 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastSaint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 6–2 1948–49 British Home Championship
1710 November 1948 Flag of England.svg Villa Park, Birmingham Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 1–0 1948–49 British Home Championship
1810 November 1948 Flag of England.svg Highbury, LondonFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 6–0International Match
199 April 1949 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–3 1948–49 British Home Championship
2013 May 1949 Flag of Sweden.svg Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1–31949 European tour
2118 May 1949 Flag of Norway.svg Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4–1
2222 May 1949 Flag of France (1794-1815).svg Stade Colombes, Paris Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg  France 3–1
2321 September 1949 Flag of England.svg Goodison Park, LiverpoolFlag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 0–2 International Match
2415 October 1949 Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg Ninian Park, CardiffFlag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 4–1 1949–50 British Home Championship
2516 November 1949 Flag of England.svg Maine Road, ManchesterSaint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 9–2 1949–50 British Home Championship
2630 November 1949 Flag of England.svg White Hart Lane, London Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 2–0International Match
2725 May 1950 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–0 1949–50 British Home Championship
2814 May 1950 Flag of Portugal.svg Estádio Nacional, LisbonFlag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 5–31950 European tour
2918 May 1950 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Heysel Stadium, BrusselsFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 4–1
3025 June 1950 Flag of Brazil (1960-1968).svg Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 2–0 1950 FIFA World Cup
3119 June 1950 Flag of Brazil (1960-1968).svg Estádio Independência, Belo Horizonte Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 0–1 1950 FIFA World Cup
322 July 1950 Flag of Brazil (1960-1968).svg Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de JaneiroFlag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 0–1 1950 FIFA World Cup
337 October 1950 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 4–1 1950–51 British Home Championship
3415 November 1950 Flag of England.svg Roker Park, Sunderland Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 6–2 1950–51 British Home Championship
3515 November 1950 Flag of England.svg Highbury, LondonFlag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 2–2International Match
3614 April 1951 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 2–3 1950–51 British Home Championship
379 May 1951 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2–1International Match
3819 May 1951 Flag of England.svg Goodison Park, LiverpoolFlag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 5–2International Match
393 October 1951 Flag of England.svg Highbury, LondonFlag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg  France 2–2International Match
4020 October 1951 Flag of Wales (1807-1953).svg Ninian Park, CardiffFlag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 1–1 1951–52 British Home Championship
4114 November 1951 Flag of England.svg Villa Park, BirminghamUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 2–0 1951–52 British Home Championship
4228 November 1951 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Austria.svg  Austria 2–2International Match
435 April 1952 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 2–0 1951–52 British Home Championship
4418 May 1952 Flag of Italy.svg Stadio Comunale, Florence Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1–11952 European tour
4525 May 1952 Flag of Austria.svg Praterstadion, Vienna Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 3–2
4628 May 1952 Flag of Switzerland.svg Hardturm, ZürichFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3–0
474 October 1952 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 2–2 1952–53 British Home Championship
4812 November 1952 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Wales (1807-1953).svg  Wales 5–2 1952–53 British Home Championship
4926 November 1952 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5–0International Match
5018 April 1953 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 2–2 1952–53 British Home Championship
5117 May 1953 Flag of Argentina.svg Estadio Monumental, Buenos Aires Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 0–01953 American tour
5224 May 1953 Flag of Chile.svg Estadio Nacional, Santiago Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 2–1
5331 May 1953 Flag of Uruguay.svg Estadio Centenario, Montevideo Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 1–2
548 June 1953 Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Polo Grounds, New York City Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 6–3
5510 October 1953 Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg Ninian Park, CardiffFlag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 4–1 1953–54 British Home Championship
5621 October 1953 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, London FIFA XI4–4International Match
5711 November 1953 Flag of England.svg Goodison Park, LiverpoolUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 3–1 1953–54 British Home Championship
5825 November 1953 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary 3–6 International Match
593 April 1954 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 4–2 1953–54 British Home Championship
6016 May 1954 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Partizan Stadium, Belgrade Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 0–11954 European tour
6123 May 1954 Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary 1–7
6217 June 1954 Flag of Switzerland.svg St. Jakob-Park, Basel Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 4–4 1954 FIFA World Cup
6320 June 1954 Flag of Switzerland.svg Wankdorf Stadium, Bern Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 2–0 1954 FIFA World Cup
6426 June 1954 Flag of Switzerland.svg St. Jakob-Park, BaselFlag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 2–4 1954 FIFA World Cup
652 October 1954 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 2–0 1954–55 British Home Championship
6610 November 1954 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 3–2 1954–55 British Home Championship
671 December 1954 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Germany.svg  West Germany 3–1International Match
682 April 1955 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 7–2 1954–55 British Home Championship
6915 May 1955 Flag of France (1794-1815).svg Stade Colombes, ParisFlag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg  France 0–11955 European tour
7018 May 1955 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Santiago Bernabéu, Madrid Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 1–1
7122 May 1955 Flag of Portugal.svg Estádio das Antas, Porto Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1–3
722 October 1955 Flag of Denmark.svg Idrætspark, CopenhagenFlag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 5–1International Match
7322 October 1955 Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg Ninian Park, CardiffFlag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 1–2 1955–56 British Home Championship
742 November 1955 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 3–0 1955–56 British Home Championship
7530 November 1955 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 4–1International Match
7614 April 1956 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–1 1955–56 British Home Championship
779 May 1956 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 4–2International Match
7816 May 1956 Flag of Sweden.svg Råsunda Stadium, StockholmFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 0–01956 European tour
7920 May 1956 Flag of Finland.svg Olympic Stadium, Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 5–1
8026 May 1956 Flag of Germany.svg Olympic Stadium, West Berlin Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 3–1
816 October 1956 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 1–1 1956–57 British Home Championship
8214 November 1956 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 3–1 1956–57 British Home Championship
8328 November 1956 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 3–0International Match
845 December 1956 Flag of England.svg Molineux, Wolverhampton Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 5–2 1958 FIFA World Cup qualification
856 April 1957 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 2–1 1956–57 British Home Championship
868 May 1957 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 5–11958 FIFA World Cup qualification
8715 May 1957 Flag of Denmark.svg Idrætspark, CopenhagenFlag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 4–11958 FIFA World Cup qualification
8819 May 1957 Flag of Ireland.svg Dalymount Park, DublinFlag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 1–11958 FIFA World Cup qualification
8919 October 1957 Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg Ninian Park, CardiffFlag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 4–0 1957–58 British Home Championship
906 November 1957 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 2–3 1957–58 British Home Championship
9127 November 1957 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of France.svg  France 4–0International Match
9219 April 1958 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 4–0 1957–58 British Home Championship
937 May 1958 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 2–1International Match
9411 May 1958 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Partizan Stadium, BelgradeFlag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 0–51958 European tour
9518 May 1958 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Lenin Stadium, Moscow Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 1–1
968 June 1958 Flag of Sweden.svg Ullevi, Gothenburg Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 2–2 1958 FIFA World Cup
9711 June 1958 Flag of Sweden.svg Ullevi, GothenburgFlag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 0–0 1958 FIFA World Cup
9815 June 1958 Flag of Sweden.svg Ryavallen, Borås Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 2–2 1958 FIFA World Cup
9919 June 1958 Flag of Sweden.svg Ullevi, GothenburgFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 0–1 1958 FIFA World Cup
1004 October 1958 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 3–3 1958–59 British Home Championship
10122 October 1958 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 5–0International Match
10226 November 1958 Flag of England.svg Villa Park, BirminghamFlag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 2–2 1958–59 British Home Championship
10311 April 1959 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–0 1958–59 British Home Championship
1046 May 1959 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Italy.svg  Italy 2–2International Match
10513 May 1959 Flag of Brazil (1960-1968).svg Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de JaneiroFlag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 1–41959 American tour
10617 May 1959 Flag of Peru.svg Estadio Nacional, Lima Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 1–4
10724 May 1959 Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).svg Estadio Olímpico Universitario, Mexico City Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).svg  Mexico 1–2
10828 May 1959 Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Wrigley Field, Los Angeles Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 8–1
10917 October 1959 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ninian Park, CardiffFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 1–1 1959–60 British Home Championship
11028 October 1959 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2–3International Match
11118 November 1959 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 2–1 1959–60 British Home Championship
1129 April 1960 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–1 1959–60 British Home Championship
11311 May 1960 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 3–3International Match
11415 May 1960 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Santiago Bernabéu, MadridFlag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 0–31960 European tour
11522 May 1960 Flag of Hungary.svg Népstadion, BudapestFlag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 0–2
1168 October 1960 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 5–2 1960–61 British Home Championship
11719 October 1960 Flag of Luxembourg.svg Stade Municipal, Luxembourg City Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 9–0 1962 FIFA World Cup qualification
11826 October 1960 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 4–2International Match
11923 November 1960 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 5–1 1960–61 British Home Championship
12015 April 1961 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 9–3 1960–61 British Home Championship
12110 May 1961 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Mexico (1934-1968).svg  Mexico 8–0International Match
12221 May 1961 Flag of Portugal.svg Estádio Nacional, LisbonFlag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1–11962 FIFA World Cup qualification
12324 May 1961 Flag of Italy.svg Stadio Olimpico, Rome Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 3–21961 European tour
12427 May 1961 Flag of Austria.svg Praterstadion, ViennaFlag of Austria.svg  Austria 1–3
12528 September 1961 Flag of England.svg Highbury, LondonFlag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 4–11962 FIFA World Cup qualification
12614 October 1961 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ninian Park, CardiffFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 1–1 1961–62 British Home Championship
12725 October 1961 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 2–01962 FIFA World Cup qualification
12822 November 1961 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 1–1 1961–62 British Home Championship
1294 April 1962 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Austria.svg  Austria 3–1International Match
13014 April 1962 Flag of Scotland.svg Hampden Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 0–2 1961–62 British Home Championship
1319 May 1962 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3–1International Match
13220 May 1962 Flag of Peru.svg Estadio Nacional, LimaFlag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 4–0International Match
13331 May 1962 Flag of Chile.svg Estadio El Teniente, Rancagua Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 1–2 1962 FIFA World Cup
1342 June 1962 Flag of Chile.svg Estadio El Teniente, RancaguaFlag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 3–1 1962 FIFA World Cup
1357 June 1962 Flag of Chile.svg Estadio El Teniente, RancaguaFlag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg  Bulgaria 0–0 1962 FIFA World Cup
13610 June 1962 Flag of Chile.svg Estadio Sausalito, Viña del Mar Flag of Brazil (1960-1968).svg  Brazil 1–3 1962 FIFA World Cup
1373 October 1962 Flag of England.svg Hillsborough, Sheffield Flag of France.svg  France 1–1 1964 European Nations' Cup qualifying
13820 October 1962 Ulster Banner.svg Windsor Park, BelfastUlster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 3–1 1962–63 British Home Championship
13921 November 1962 Flag of England.svg Wembley Stadium, LondonFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 4–0 1962–63 British Home Championship

England record versus other countries

Walter Winterbottom international managerial record
CountryGWDLGFGA+/–Win %
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 321052+3066.67
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 52211110+1040.00
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 4310187+11075.00
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 411269−3025.00
Flag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg  Bulgaria 101000+0000.00
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 220041+3100.00
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 4310144+10075.00
FIFA XI101044+0000.00
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 110051+4100.00
Flag of France.svg  France 6321136+7050.00
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 4004517−12000.00
Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 4310248+16075.00
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5320125+7060.00
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 2200131+12100.00
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 210192+7050.00
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 110082+6100.00
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 138413316+17061.54
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 110041+3100.00
Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 210152+3050.00
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 75112610+16071.43
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 421174+3050.00
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 169433921+18056.25
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 412184+4025.00
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 521298+1040.00
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 411278−1025.00
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 5401142+12080.00
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 3201145+9066.67
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 200236−3000.00
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 1712415117+34070.59
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 220062+4100.00
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 5122811−3020.00
Total139783328385195+190056.12

Honours

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Anthony, Mason (2008). New Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  2. "englandfootballonline.com".
  3. Dave, Bowler (1999). Alf Ramsey:Winning isn't Everything.
  4. 1 2 Mason, Anthony (2008). New Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
  5. "BBC Radio, 1963, People Today". 1963.
  6. Mason, Anthony (2008). New Oxford Dictionary Biography.
  7. Goldblatt, David (2008). The Ball Is Round: A Global History of Soccer. Penguin. p. 443. ISBN   978-1-59448-296-0.
  8. Baker, William Joseph (1988). Sports in the Western world . University of Illinois Press. p.  308. ISBN   0-252-06042-3.
  9. MacIntosh, Iain. "Vox in the Box: Brian Glanville". The Set Pieces. Retrieved 15 April 2019.
  10. Mason, Tony, Holt, Richard. Sport in Britain 1945–2000.
  11. Holt, Richard, Mason, Anthony. Sport in Britain 1945–2000.
  12. 1 2 Coghlan, John. Sport and British Politics since 1960.
  13. "Public FIFA Records".
  14. "Indianfootball.com".

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