War effort

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{{small industry to complete command of society.

Although many societies were retroactively perceived to be engaged in a war effort, the concept was not generally used until the last decade of the 18th century, when the leaders of the French Revolution called for the levée en masse and a general mobilization of society to prevent monarchist forces from reclaiming control of the French government.

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The concept was subsequently adapted and used by Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, especially during World War I and World War II. The term war effort was coined in conjunction with these efforts.[ citation needed ]

Economy

Although certain societies, especially nomadic raiders and mobile cavalry societies such as the Mongols, specialized in providing war-effort-like support for their armies, the idea of a specialized war effort that diverted supplies, means of production, and people to military support came into general use only with the increased specialization of the industrial revolution. Previously, most military supplies were either common elements of the economy (food, clothing, horses) or specialized instruments produced only for war purposes by industries dedicated to the task (mainly weapons and military vehicles).

Moreover, in feudal societies, peasants, the great majority of the population, often perceived war as the business of the aristocrats and did not feel especially obliged to make an extra effort to help their country's aristocracy win a war with that of another country. The modern concept of a state belonging to its

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World War 2:

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United States home front during World War II The civilian population and activities of the United States during World War II

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Latinas and World War II

Latina women, or women of Latin-American descent, contributed much to the U.S. war effort during World War II. This period gave Latina women the opportunity to express their own agency and examine their roles as women and Latinas in the context of American society. Through their support of U.S. war efforts both overseas and on the homefront, these women began to question their societal status and call for changes within their culture and country.

United Kingdom home front during World War II The civilian population and activities of the United Kingdom during World War II

The United Kingdom home front during World War II covers the political, social and economic history during 1939–1945. See also Timeline of the United Kingdom home front during World War II, Military history of the United Kingdom during World War II and Diplomatic history of World War II.

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