Warren Powers

Last updated
Warren Powers
Biographical details
Born (1941-02-19) February 19, 1941 (age 80)
Kansas City, Missouri
Playing career
1960–1962 Nebraska
1963–1968 Oakland Raiders
Position(s) Running back, defensive back
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1969–1976 Nebraska (DB)
1977 Washington State
1978–1984 Missouri
Head coaching record
Overall53–37–3 (.586)
Bowls3–2
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award (1978)

Warren Anthony Powers (born February 19, 1941) is a former American football player and coach. He was the head coach at Washington State University in 1977, and the University of Missouri from 1978 through 1984, [1] compiling an overall college football record of 53–37–3 (.586).

Contents

Early years

He was an all-state high school quarterback at Bishop Lillis High School from Kansas City, Missouri, and played college football at Nebraska, earning three letters as a Husker. As a senior, he helped lead Bob Devaney's first Nebraska team in 1962.

Powers played professionally for six years in the American Football League (AFL) with the Oakland Raiders. As a safety, he started for the 1967 AFL Champion Raiders and in the second AFL-NFL World Championship game, known now as Super Bowl II. [2]

Coaching career

Following his playing career, Powers was an assistant coach under both Bob Devaney and Tom Osborne at the University of Nebraska from 1969 through 1976.

After leaving Nebraska, Powers became the head coach at Washington State. One year after he left Nebraska, Powers took his unranked Washington State Cougars into Lincoln and knocked off the fifteenth-ranked Huskers in the season opener at Memorial Stadium. [3] [4]

The following year in 1978, Powers became the head coach at Missouri. With the Missouri Tigers, Powers again went to Lincoln with another unranked team and pulled off a victory over the second-ranked Nebraska team. Following that game, it would be another 25 years until 2003 when the Missouri Tigers would again defeat the Nebraska Cornhuskers. During his tenure at Missouri, Powers compiled a 46–33–3 (.579) record, including four straight bowl appearances from 1978 to 1981. His best seasons came in 1980 and 1981, where he posted consecutive 8–4 records. In addition, his Tiger football teams went 3–2 in bowl games, defeating LSU in the 1978 Liberty Bowl, South Carolina in the 1979 Hall of Fame Classic, and Southern Miss in the 1981 Tangerine Bowl. During Powers' tensure, Missouri also played in the 1980 Liberty Bowl, losing to Purdue, and the 1983 Holiday Bowl, losing to a BYU Cougars team led by quarterback Steve Young.

On October 24, 1979, the NCAA's Committee on Infractions publicly reprimanded Missouri for a violation of NCAA Constitution related to a failure to exercise institutional control. The violation was in regard to the use of a fund established outside the university for the purpose of paying Powers for debt he assumed while negotiating to become Missouri's head coach. NCAA regulations require the university's involvement when its coach receives a cash supplement related to duties he is performing on the institution's behalf, and the NCAA found that Missouri had failed to do so.

After a disappointing 3–7–1 season in 1984 that concluded with another loss to rival Kansas, Powers was relieved of his duties. [3]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
Washington State Cougars (Pacific-8 Conference)(1977)
1977 Washington State 7–43–4T–4th
Washington State:7–43–4
Missouri Tigers (Big Eight Conference)(1978–1984)
1978 Missouri 8–44–3T–3rdW Liberty 1415
1979 Missouri 7–53–44thW Hall of Fame Classic 20
1980 Missouri 8–45–23rdL Liberty
1981 Missouri 8–43–45thW Tangerine 2019
1982 Missouri 5–4–22–3–25th
1983 Missouri 7–55–2T–2ndL Holiday
1984 Missouri 3–7–12–4–1T–5th
Missouri:46–33–324–22–3
Total:53–37–3

See also

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References

  1. "Missouri gives one-time WSU Coach Powers the heave-ho". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. November 20, 1983. p. 3C.
  2. "Green Bay solid favorites over injury weakened Raiders". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. January 14, 1968. p. 12.
  3. 1 2 Missildine, Harry (September 11, 1977). "Confident Cougars upset Cornhuskers". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. D1.
  4. Drosendahl, Glenn (September 11, 1977). "Cougs upset Huskers". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). p. 1B.