Warren Steller

Last updated
Warren Steller
Warren Steller.jpg
Biographical details
Born(1897-10-08)October 8, 1897
DiedAugust 6, 1974(1974-08-06) (aged 76)
Playing career
Football
1917 Oberlin
1919 Oberlin
Basketball
1917–1918 Oberlin
Baseball
c. 1918 Oberlin
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1924–1934 Bowling Green
Basketball
1922–1923 Wesleyan
1924–1925 Bowling Green
Baseball
1923 Wesleyan
1925 Bowling Green
1928–1959 Bowling Green
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1924–1941 Bowling Green
Head coaching record
Overall40–21–19 (football)
18–12 (basketball)
228–164 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
3 Northwest Ohio League (1925, 1928–1929)

Warren E. Steller (October 8, 1897 – August 6, 1974) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Bowling Green State Normal School—now known as Bowling Green State University—from 1924 to 1934, compiling a record of 40–21–19. Steller was also the head basketball coach at Wesleyan University in 1922–23 and at Bowling Green in 1924–25, tallying a career college basketball mark of 18–12. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Wesleyan in 1923 and at Bowling Green in 1925 and again from 1928 to 1959, amassing a career college baseball record of 228–164. Steller attended Oberlin College, where he played football, basketball, and baseball, and is considered one of the finest athletes ever to play for the Yeoman. In 1921, the Oberlin football team beat Ohio State, 7–6, the last time an intrastate opponent beat Ohio State. Steller scored the winning touchdown. In 1965, Bowling Green renamed its baseball stadium Warren E. Steller Field in dedication to the former coach. [1]

Contents

Playing career

In 1921, Oberlin's football team beat Ohio State, 7–6, at Columbus. The Ohio State team had gone to the Rose Bowl the previous season. That was the last time an intrastate team beat Ohio State. Steller scored the winning touchdown after the team made an 85-yard march down the field in the third quarter, culminating in a short pass across the goal line and a point-after. Ohio State's coach, John Wilce, was so upset by the loss that he made his squad stay on the field after the game for a special practice session. [2]

Coaching career

Steller's 1944 baseball team at Bowling Green was Ohio college champions.

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Bowling Green Normals/Falcons (Northwest Ohio League)(1924–1931)
1924 Bowling Green 3–42–2
1925 Bowling Green 3–1–32–0–11st
1926 Bowling Green 4–3–12–12nd
1927 Bowling Green 5–1–12–12nd
1928 Bowling Green 5–0–23–0–11st
1929 Bowling Green 4–2–13–0–1T–1st
1930 Bowling Green 6–0–22–0–22nd
1931 Bowling Green 3–1–40–1–23rd
Bowling Green Falcons (Independent)(1932)
1932 Bowling Green 3–3–1
Bowling Green Falcons (Ohio Athletic Conference)(1933–1934)
1933 Bowling Green 2–3–21–3–216th
1934 Bowling Green 2–3–22–3–2T–12th
Bowling Green:40–21–1919–11–11
Total:40–21–19
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. "BGSU Historical Campus Tour - Warren E. Steller Field". Bowling Green State University. Archived from the original on April 15, 2008. Retrieved April 27, 2008.
  2. When Oberlin Was King of The Gridiron: the Heisman Years by Nat Brandt