Watford City, North Dakota

Last updated
Watford City, North Dakota
City
Main Street-Watford City.jpg
Main Street Watford City
Motto(s): "Come be our guest"
ND McKenzie County Watford City.svg
Location in North Dakota
Coordinates: 47°48′9″N103°16′50″W / 47.80250°N 103.28056°W / 47.80250; -103.28056 Coordinates: 47°48′9″N103°16′50″W / 47.80250°N 103.28056°W / 47.80250; -103.28056
Country United States
State North Dakota
County McKenzie
Founded1914
Government
   Mayor Philip Riely
Area [1]
  Total1.41 sq mi (3.65 km2)
  Land1.40 sq mi (3.63 km2)
  Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation2,119 ft (646 m)
Population (2010) [2]
  Total1,744
  Estimate (2017) [3] 6,523
  Density1,200/sq mi (480/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (CST)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
ZIP code 58854
Area code(s) 701
FIPS code 38-83860
GNIS feature ID1032701 [4]
Highways US 85, ND 23, ND 23 Alt.
Website Watford City

Watford City (Hidatsa: abaʔaruʔush), [5] founded in 1914, is a city in and the county seat of McKenzie County, North Dakota, United States. [6] The population was 1,744 at the 2010 census. [7] and the Census Bureau gave the 2017 estimated population as 6,523, making Watford City the twelfth largest city in North Dakota. Because Watford City is part of the Bakken field, the North Dakota oil boom has significantly increased population and construction since the 2010 census. [8]

Hidatsa is an endangered Siouan language that is related to the Crow language. It is spoken by the Hidatsa tribe, primarily in North Dakota and South Dakota.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

McKenzie County, North Dakota County in the United States

McKenzie County is a county in the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 6,360. Its county seat is Watford City. Between 2010 and 2018, according to Census Bureau estimates, it was the fastest growing county in the United States, growing 114.3 percent. The county lies immediately adjacent to the Williston Micropolitan Statistical Area, although the Census Bureau does not include McKenzie County in that grouping.

Contents

The main offices of Frontier Energy Group, First International Bank, and the headquarters of McKenzie Electric Cooperative are in Watford City. The local newspaper is the McKenzie County Farmer .

First International Bank & Trust started in 1910 as Farmers State Bank in Arnegard, North Dakota. In 1934 the bank moved its headquarters to Watford City, North Dakota and changed the name to First International Bank. With the steady expansion across the upper Midwest and in Arizona, their strong, service-minded bank continues to make a difference. First International Bank & Trust is owned by Watford City Bancshares, Inc., which is owned by the Stenehjem family. First International Bank & Trust is a full service, independent community bank, a member of the FDIC and an equal housing lender. First International Bank & Trust has 22 locations in North Dakota, Minnesota, and Arizona.

McKenzie Electric Cooperative, Inc. (MEC) is a rural electric cooperative based in Watford City, North Dakota. It services portions of McKenzie, Dunn, Billings, Golden Valley and Mercer Counties in North Dakota and Richland and Wibaux Counties in Montana. MEC is a member of the North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives.

The McKenzie County Farmer is a weekly newspaper based in Watford City, North Dakota. It serves Watford City and all of McKenzie County, North Dakota.

History

In 1913, a few prospective businessmen located on the townsite of the future Watford City in anticipation of the arrival of the first Great Northern Railroad train. The Northern Land and Townsite Company, a division of the Great Northern, platted the town and sold lots in June 1914. Building began immediately, and many businesses and homes were moved from Schafer, which eventually became a ghost town. Watford was incorporated in June 1915, and was named by Dr. Vaughan G. Morris (1879–1940) for his hometown of Watford, Ontario. [9] [10] A year later the town added "City" to its name to differentiate itself from Wolford in Pierce County. [11]

Great Northern Railway (U.S.) defunct American Class I railway company (1889–1970)

The Great Northern Railway was an American Class I railroad. Running from Saint Paul, Minnesota, to Seattle, Washington, it was the creation of 19th-century railroad entrepreneur James J. Hill and was developed from the Saint Paul & Pacific Railroad. The Great Northern's (GN) route was the northernmost transcontinental railroad route in the U.S.

Schafer, North Dakota Unincorporated area in North Dakota, United States

Schafer is an unincorporated area and the former county seat of McKenzie County, North Dakota, United States. It faded into obscurity after the county seat was moved west to Watford City, and is now a ghost town. The town would still exist, but due to a land dispute in between the Schafer family and the Great Northern Railway, the railroad never laid tracks, but grading was done to the Missouri river.

Wolford, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Wolford is a city in Pierce County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 36 at the 2010 census. Wolford was founded in 1905.

The Great Northern planned to extend its line to New Rockford and in 1914 began building the "Madson Grade," one of the longest dirt filled railroad grades in the country about a mile west of town. Two years later the grade was ninety feet high and nearly a mile long, but the project was abandoned shortly before the United States entered World War I. [9]

New Rockford, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

New Rockford is a city in Eddy County, North Dakota, United States. It is the county seat of Eddy County. The population was 1,391 at the 2010 census. New Rockford was founded in 1883.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Village officers were elected in 1915, and they concerned themselves with such tasks as impounding stray horses and cattle, prohibiting swine and chickens from town, locating hitching posts, and removing hay stacks from Main Street. [9] The town had a band and baseball team from its founding. A school and several churches were also constructed almost immediately. During the Great Depression, a water and sanitary system was completed using labor mostly paid by the Public Works Administration. [9]

Great Depression 20th-century worldwide economic depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the world's economy can decline.

Public Works Administration administered a comprehensive public works program to promote and stabilize employment

Public Works Administration (PWA), part of the New Deal of 1933, was a large-scale public works construction agency in the United States headed by Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes. It was created by the National Industrial Recovery Act in June 1933 in response to the Great Depression. It built large-scale public works such as dams, bridges, hospitals, and schools. Its goals were to spend $3.3 billion in the first year, and $6 billion in all, to provide employment, stabilize purchasing power, and help revive the economy. Most of the spending came in two waves in 1933-35, and again in 1938. Originally called the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works, it was renamed the Public Works Administration in 1935 and shut down in 1944.

In 1940, Watford City won a hotly contested campaign for county seat, defeating Alexander and Arnegard and taking the prize from Schafer. At first there was difficulty finding suitable office space, and a recently constructed hospital was sold to the county for use as a courthouse. A new hospital was dedicated in 1952. [9] Watford City Air Force Station (formally Alexander) was opened nearby in 1979.

Alexander, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Alexander is a city in McKenzie County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 223 at the 2010 census. Alexander was founded in 1905 and is named after early North Dakota politician Alexander McKenzie.

Arnegard, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Arnegard is a city in McKenzie County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 115 at the 2010 census. Arnegard was founded in 1913.

Watford City Air Force Station is a joint United States Air Force and Federal Aviation Administration installation located about 40 km southwest of Watford City, North Dakota. It is the site of an ARSR-4 radar system, which provides air traffic surveillance along the US-Canada border, as well as limited weather radar data.

Geography

Watford City is located at 47°48′9″N103°16′50″W / 47.80250°N 103.28056°W / 47.80250; -103.28056 (47.802603, -103.280505). [12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.41 square miles (3.65 km2), of which, 1.40 square miles (3.63 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water. [1]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1920 260
1930 769195.8%
1940 1,02333.0%
1950 1,37134.0%
1960 1,86536.0%
1970 1,768−5.2%
1980 2,11919.9%
1990 1,784−15.8%
2000 1,435−19.6%
2010 1,74421.5%
Est. 20176,523 [3] 274.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [13]
2017 Estimate [14]

2010 census

As of the census [2] of 2010, there were 1,744 people, 733 households, and 445 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,245.7 inhabitants per square mile (481.0/km2). There were 873 housing units at an average density of 623.6 per square mile (240.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.6% White, 0.1% African American, 3.4% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.9% of the population.

There were 733 households of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.3% were non-families. 34.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.94.

The median age in the city was 40.2 years. 24.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.6% were from 25 to 44; 26.8% were from 45 to 64; and 17.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.1% male and 48.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,435 people, 619 households, and 378 families residing in the city. The population density was 964.8 people per square mile (371.9/km²). There were 790 housing units at an average density of 531.2 per square mile (204.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.91% White, 0.21% African American, 3.83% Native American, 0.07% Asian, and 0.98% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.11% of the population.

There were 619 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.9% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.8% were non-families. 37.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 22.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 20.4% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 24.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,688, and the median income for a family was $36,850. Males had a median income of $32,250 versus $21,193 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,084. About 9.8% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.0% of those under age 18 and 13.9% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Sites of interest

Climate

This climatic region is typified by large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot (and often humid) summers and cold (sometimes severely cold) winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Watford City has a humid continental climate, abbreviated "Dfb" on climate maps. [15] The wettest time of year is late spring to early summer; winter is the driest season. Temperature variation between seasons is significant.

Climate data for Watford City, North Dakota
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)57
(14)
64
(18)
81
(27)
92
(33)
103
(39)
110
(43)
112
(44)
111
(44)
103
(39)
96
(36)
77
(25)
66
(19)
112
(44)
Average high °F (°C)20.4
(−6.4)
26.9
(−2.8)
37.7
(3.2)
54.9
(12.7)
67.3
(19.6)
75.7
(24.3)
84.5
(29.2)
83.6
(28.7)
71.5
(21.9)
58.0
(14.4)
38.9
(3.8)
26.7
(−2.9)
53.8
(12.1)
Daily mean °F (°C)10.0
(−12.2)
16.0
(−8.9)
26.4
(−3.1)
42.1
(5.6)
53.8
(12.1)
62.8
(17.1)
69.9
(21.1)
68.3
(20.2)
57.0
(13.9)
44.9
(7.2)
28.5
(−1.9)
16.6
(−8.6)
41.4
(5.2)
Average low °F (°C)−0.3
(−17.9)
5.2
(−14.9)
15.4
(−9.2)
29.2
(−1.6)
40.3
(4.6)
50.0
(10)
55.4
(13)
53.1
(11.7)
42.4
(5.8)
31.8
(−0.1)
18.1
(−7.7)
6.6
(−14.1)
28.9
(−1.7)
Record low °F (°C)−45
(−43)
−44
(−42)
−30
(−34)
−13
(−25)
12
(−11)
19
(−7)
32
(0)
29
(−2)
10
(−12)
−7
(−22)
−22
(−30)
−36
(−38)
−45
(−43)
Average precipitation inches (mm)0.5
(13)
0.4
(10)
0.7
(18)
1.3
(33)
2.1
(53)
3.4
(86)
2.3
(58)
1.5
(38)
1.3
(33)
1.0
(25)
0.6
(15)
0.5
(13)
15.6
(395)
Source: [16]

Related Research Articles

Campbell County, South Dakota County in the United States

Campbell County is a county in the U.S. state of South Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 1,466, making it the fifth-least populous county in South Dakota. Its county seat is Mound City. The county was created in 1873 and organized in 1884. It was named for Norman B. Campbell, a Dakota Territory legislator in 1873 and son of General Charles T. Campbell.

Williams County, North Dakota County in the United States

Williams County is a county in the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 22,398. Its county seat is Williston. Between 2010 and 2018, according to Census Bureau estimates, it was the second fastest growing county in the United States, trailing only neighboring McKenzie County, to its south.

Golden Valley County, North Dakota County in the United States

Golden Valley County is a county in the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 1,680, making it the fourth-least populous county in North Dakota. The county seat is Beach.

Wibaux County, Montana County in the United States

Wibaux County is a county in the U.S. state of Montana. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 1,017 making it the fourth-least populous county in Montana. Its county seat is Wibaux.

Roosevelt County, Montana County in the United States

Roosevelt County is a county in the U.S. state of Montana. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 10,425. Its county seat is Wolf Point. Roosevelt County was created by the Montana Legislature in 1919 from a portion of Sheridan County. The name honors former president Theodore Roosevelt, who had died earlier that year.

Laurie, Missouri Village in Missouri, United States

Laurie is a village in southern Morgan and northern Camden counties, Missouri, United States. The population was 945 at the 2010 census.

Killdeer, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Killdeer is a city in Dunn County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 751 at the 2010 census.

Carrington, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Carrington is a city in Foster County, North Dakota, United States. It is the county seat of Foster County. The population was 2,065 at the 2010 census. Carrington was founded in 1883.

Towner, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Towner is a city in McHenry County, North Dakota, United States. It is the county seat of McHenry County. The population was 533 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Minot Micropolitan Statistical Area. Towner was founded in 1886.

Wishek, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Wishek is a city in McIntosh County, North Dakota, in the United States. The population was 1,002 at the 2010 census.

Mandaree, North Dakota Census-designated place & Unincorporated community in North Dakota, United States

Mandaree is a census-designated place (CDP) in McKenzie County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 596 at the 2010 census.

Stanton, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Stanton is a city in Mercer County, North Dakota, United States. It is the county seat of Mercer County. The population was 366 at the 2010 census. Stanton was founded in 1883 and became the county seat when Mercer County organized in 1884.

New Town, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

New Town is a city in Mountrail County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 1,925 in 2010 census. New Town was platted in 1950 as a replacement site for the residents of Sanish and Van Hook Township, as these towns were scheduled to be flooded by the creation of Lake Sakakawea, a reservoir to provide water for irrigation.

Parshall, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Parshall is a city lying within the jurisdictional boundaries of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation. It is located on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in Mountrail County, North Dakota, United States. Its population was 903 at the 2010 census. Parshall was founded in 1914 by George Parshall, and is the home of the Paul Broste Rock Museum.

Stanley, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Stanley is a city in Mountrail County, North Dakota, United States. It is the county seat of Mountrail County. The population was 1,458 at the 2010 census. making it the nineteen largest city in North Dakota. Stanley was founded in 1902.

Rugby, North Dakota Town in North Dakota, United States

Rugby is a city in, and the county seat of, Pierce County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 2,876 at the 2010 census, making it the eighteenth largest city in North Dakota. Rugby was founded in 1886.

Gregory, South Dakota City in South Dakota, United States

Gregory is a city in western Gregory County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 1,295 at the 2010 census.

References

  1. 1 2 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-06-14.
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-02-17. Retrieved 2012-06-14.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Archived from the original on 2012-02-26. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "Hidatsa Lessons Vocab2". Hidatsa Language Program. Archived from the original on 2013-06-06. Retrieved 2012-07-17.
  6. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  7. "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  8. Shipman, Neal A. (January 30, 2013). "A Building Boom Coming". McKenzie County Farmer. Archived from the original on 16 January 2018. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 Watford City diamond jubilee, Watford City, North Dakota: 75 years of progress. Watford City, ND: The Committee. 1989. OCLC   23135720.
  10. After graduating from Wayne State University, Morris first homesteaded near Schafer and then became Watford City's first doctor. Eventually Morris moved to Beach. He is buried in a cemetery between Watford City and Schafer.
  11. Wick, Douglas A. (1988). North Dakota Place Names. Bismarck, North Dakota: Hedemarken Collectibles. ISBN   0-9620968-0-6. OCLC   191277027.
  12. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Archived from the original on 2012-03-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  13. "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 21, 2014.
  14. "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  15. "Watford City, North Dakota Köppen Climate Classification (Weatherbase)". Weatherbase. Archived from the original on 21 September 2015. Retrieved 24 April 2018.
  16. "Monthly Averages for Watford City, ND". weatherbase.com. Retrieved 2017-11-29.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Watford City, North Dakota at Wikimedia Commons