Wath, Harrogate

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Wath
Main street, Wath, Harrogate (2007).jpg
Wath
North Yorkshire UK location map.svg
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Wath
Wath shown within North Yorkshire
Population210 (2015)
OS grid reference SE324770
Civil parish
  • Wath
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town RIPON
Postcode district HG4
Police North Yorkshire
Fire North Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
54°11′19″N1°30′18″W / 54.18862°N 1.5049°W / 54.18862; -1.5049 Coordinates: 54°11′19″N1°30′18″W / 54.18862°N 1.5049°W / 54.18862; -1.5049

Wath (alias Wath-by-Rippon) is a village and civil parish 3.7 miles (6 km) north of Ripon [1] in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. [2] The population of the parish was estimated at 210 in 2015. [3]

Civil parish territorial designation and lowest tier of local government in England, UK

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government, they are a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s.

Ripon cathedral city in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England

Ripon is a cathedral city in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is located at the confluence of two tributaries of the River Ure, the Laver and Skell. The city is noted for its main feature, Ripon Cathedral which is architecturally significant, as well as the Ripon Racecourse and other features such as its market. The city itself is just over 1,300 years old.

North Yorkshire County of England

North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan county and largest ceremonial county in England. It is located primarily in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber but partly in the region of North East England. The estimated population of North Yorkshire was 602,300 in mid-2016.

Contents

The parish church is dedicated to St Mary. [4]

History

The name Wath derives from Old Norse and means "ford", [5] which has led to speculation that the name associates with a crossing through water, most likely Wath Beck at the east end of the village. [6] The village is noted in the Domesday Book [7] where it was in the ownership of Count Alan, having previously been owned by Archil and Rothschil in 1066. William the Conqueror granted to Count Alan. [8] [6]

Old Norse North Germanic language

Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th century.

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

William I, usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke of Normandy from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son.

The manor and village were in dispute about ownership through the first half of the 13th century. These disputes culminated in a Papal Court which decided that the two warring parties would submit a champion each in a duel. The abbot of Mont St Michel feared for his life, and that of his champion, and so renounced all claims on the village. The winner was Sir Robert Marmion, whose family were already resident at West Tanfield and who built their castle (Marmion Tower). [9]

West Tanfield village in England

West Tanfield is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. The village is situated approximately six miles north of Ripon on the A6108, which goes from Ripon to Masham and Wensleydale. The parish includes the hamlets of Nosterfield, Thornborough and Binsoe.

Marmion Tower former gatehouse of Tanfield Castle fortified manor

Marmion Tower, also known historically as Tanfield Castle, is a 15th-century gatehouse near the village of West Tanfield in North Yorkshire, England. It survived the destruction of the surrounding fortified manor and is now managed by English Heritage.

Wath was historically a large ancient parish in the North Riding of Yorkshire, which also included the townships of Melmerby, Middleton Quernhow and Norton Conyers. [8] Wath and the other townships became separate civil parishes in 1866. [10]

North Riding of Yorkshire

The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three historic subdivisions (ridings) of the English county of Yorkshire, alongside the East and West ridings. From the Restoration it was used as a lieutenancy area, having been part of the Yorkshire lieutenancy previously. The three ridings were treated as three counties for many purposes, such as having separate quarter sessions. An administrative county was created with a county council in 1889 under the Local Government Act 1888 on the historic boundaries. In 1974 both the administrative county and the Lieutenancy of the North Riding of Yorkshire were abolished, being succeeded in most of the riding by the new non-metropolitan county of North Yorkshire.

Melmerby, Harrogate village and civil parish in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England

Melmerby is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England, that lies 3.7 miles (6 km) north of Ripon and 0.6 miles (1 km) west of the A1(M) motorway. The population was 386 in the 2011 census.

Middleton Quernhow village in the United Kingdom

Middleton Quernhow is a settlement and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. The parish is included in the Wathvale Ward with a population of 3,479. North Yorkshire County Council estimated that the population of the parish was 60 in 2015. It is very near the A1(M) road and is 4 miles (7 km) north of Ripon.

Governance

Wath is part of the electoral ward of Wathvale. This ward stretches south to Norton-le-Clay with a total population taken at the 2011 Census of 3,479. [11]

The wards and electoral divisions in the United Kingdom are electoral districts at sub-national level represented by one or more councillors. The ward is the primary unit of English electoral geography for civil parishes and borough and district councils, electoral ward is the unit used by Welsh principal councils, while the electoral division is the unit used by English county councils and some unitary authorities. Each ward/division has an average electorate of about 5,500 people, but ward-population counts can vary substantially. As at the end of 2014 there were 9,456 electoral wards/divisions in the UK.

Norton-le-Clay village in United Kingdom

Norton-le-Clay is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated near the A1(M) motorway and 2 miles (3.2 km) north-west of Boroughbridge. It is one of the Thankful Villages that suffered no fatalities during the Great War of 1914 to 1918.

Related Research Articles

Borough of Harrogate Borough in England

The Borough of Harrogate is a local government district and borough of North Yorkshire, England. Its population at the census of 2011 was 157,869. Its council is based in the town of Harrogate, but it also includes surrounding towns and villages and almost all of the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is the most populous district of North Yorkshire. The district is part of the Leeds City Region. It borders the City of Leeds, and the City of Bradford, districts of West Yorkshire.

Ainderby Quernhow village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England

Ainderby Quernhow is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton District of North Yorkshire, England. The village is situated on the B6267 Thirsk to Masham road just east of the A1(M) and is about five miles west of Thirsk. The population of the civil parish was estimated at 70 in 2014.

Aldfield village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England

Aldfield is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England, about three miles west of Ripon. It is the closest village to Fountains Abbey and became part of the abbey estate in 1356. The population of the parish was estimated at 80 in 2013.

Azerley village in the United Kingdom

Azerley is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is about 4 miles (6 km) north-west of Ripon.

Asenby village in the United Kingdom

Asenby is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England, with a population of 285, increasing to 311 at the 2011 census. The village is about 5 miles (8.0 km) south-west of Thirsk and 7 miles (11 km) east of Ripon. It is 12 miles (19 km) south of the County Town of Northallerton on the south bank of the River Swale.

Bishop Thornton village in United Kingdom

Bishop Thornton is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 521, decreasing to 507 at the 2011 census. The village is about seven miles north of Harrogate.

Burneston village in the United Kingdom

Burneston is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. According to the 2001 Census it had a population of 244, increasing to 311 at the 2011 Census. The village is close to the A1(M) road and is about 4 miles (6 km) south-east of Bedale.

Holme, North Yorkshire village in the United Kingdom

Holme is a small village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is located near Pickhill, Sinderby and Ainderby Quernhow, on the west bank of the River Swale. The population of the civil parish was estimated at 60 in 2014.

Swinton, Harrogate village in United Kingdom

Swinton is a small village in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated to the immediate south-west of Masham and separated from it by the River Burn. The village is at the eastern end of Swinton Park and shares a civil parish with Warthermarske.

Howe, North Yorkshire village in the United Kingdom

Howe is a small village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated near Ainderby Quernhow and the A61 and 5 miles west of Thirsk. The population of the civil parish was estimated at 20 in 2015.

Hutton Conyers village in the United Kingdom

Hutton Conyers is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated near the River Ure and 1-mile (1.6 km) north-east of Ripon. The parish extends from the River Ure to the A1(M) motorway, and includes the village of Nunwick.

Langthorpe village in the United Kingdom

Langthorpe is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. The population of the civil parish taken at the census 2011 was 812. It is situated to the immediate north of Boroughbridge on the A168 road.

Milby village in United Kingdom

Milby is a hamlet and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated to the immediate north of Boroughbridge.

Cundall, North Yorkshire village in United Kingdom

Cundall is a hamlet in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is one of the Thankful Villages that suffered no fatalities during the Great War of 1914 to 1918.

Fountains Earth is a civil parish in Harrogate district, North Yorkshire, England. The principal village in the parish is Lofthouse, and the parish also includes the hamlet of Bouthwaite and the northern part of the village of Wath. The population of the parish in the 2011 census was 197.

Norton Conyers is a civil parish in North Yorkshire, England, 3 miles (5 km) north of Ripon. There is no modern village in the parish. Most of the parish is occupied by the grounds of Norton Conyers House, which cover the site of a deserted medieval village.

Grantley, North Yorkshire civil parish in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England

Grantley is a village and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England. It lies 5 miles (8 km) west of Ripon. The parish also includes the hamlet of Low Grantley. The population of the parish was estimated at 130 in 2013.

References

  1. "99" (Map). Northallerton & Ripon. 1:50,000. Landranger. Ordnance Survey. 2016. ISBN   978-0-3192619-7-2.
  2. "Wath". ordnancesurvey.co.uk. Ordnance Survey. Retrieved 21 March 2017.
  3. "Population estimates" (PDF). North Yorkshire County Council. Retrieved 10 July 2017. In the 2011 census the population was included with Middleton Quernhow and Norton Conyers, and not counted separately. "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 7 August 2015.
  4. "Photograph of St Mary's Church, Wath, Yorkshire". GENUKI. Retrieved 7 February 2012.
  5. Ekwall, Eilert (1960). The concise Oxford dictionary of English place-names (4 ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press. p. 501. ISBN   0-19-869103-3.
  6. 1 2 Wath ca 2011, p. 3.
  7. Powell-Smith, Anna. "Wath Domesday Book". opendomesday.org. Retrieved 21 March 2017.
  8. 1 2 William Page, ed. (1914). "Parishes: Wath". Victoria County History. A History of the County of York North Riding: Volume 1. pp. 390–396. Retrieved 4 April 2017.
  9. Wath ca 2011, p. 4.
  10. Vision of Britain website
  11. "Key Figures for 2011 Census: Key Statistics - Area: Wathvale (Ward)". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 18 March 2017.

Sources

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Wath juxta Ripon at Wikimedia Commons