Watkin Lewes

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Engraving of Lewes, c. 1880 Portrait of Sir Watkin Lewes (4671600) (cropped).jpg
Engraving of Lewes, c. 1880

Sir Watkin Lewes (1740 – 13 July 1821) [1] was a Welsh politician in England.

Welsh people nation and ethnic group native to Wales

The Welsh are a Celtic nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history and the Welsh language. Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living in Wales are British citizens.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Lewes was the second son of Reverend Watkin Lewes, of Pen-y-Benglog, Melinau, and Ann Williams, of Treamlod (Ambleston), Pembrokeshire. He was educated at Shrewsbury School and at Magdalene College, Cambridge, from which he graduated in 1763. [2] He was elected alderman for the London ward of Lime Street and Sheriff of London in 1772, and was knighted in 1773. In 1780 he was elected Lord Mayor of London.

Ambleston village in United Kingdom

Ambleston is a village, parish, and community in Pembrokeshire, Wales, lying 7 miles (11 km) north-northeast of Haverfordwest. The parish includes the hamlets of Wallis and Woodstock.

Shrewsbury School independent school in Shropshire, United Kingdom

Shrewsbury School is an English independent boarding school for pupils aged 13 to 18 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, founded by Edward VI in 1552 by Royal Charter. The present campus, to which the school moved in 1882, is on the banks of the River Severn.

Magdalene College, Cambridge constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England

Magdalene College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college was founded in 1428 as a Benedictine hostel, in time coming to be known as Buckingham College, before being refounded in 1542 as the College of St Mary Magdalene. Magdalene counted some of the greatest men in the realm among its benefactors, including Britain's premier noble the Duke of Norfolk, the Duke of Buckingham and Lord Chief Justice Christopher Wray. Thomas Audley, Lord Chancellor under Henry VIII, was responsible for the refoundation of the college and also established its motto—garde ta foy. Audley's successors in the Mastership and as benefactors of the College were, however, prone to dire ends; several benefactors were arraigned at various stages on charges of high treason and executed.

In October 1781 he was elected at a by-election as one of the four Members of Parliament (MPs) for the City of London [3] He served as an MP until his defeat [3] at the 1796 general election. [1] He stood again at the general election, in 1802, but was unsuccessful. [3]

City of London (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-1950

The City of London was a United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1950.

1796 British general election

The 1796 British general election returned members to serve in the 18th and last House of Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain. They were summoned before the Union of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. The members in office in Great Britain at the end of 1800 continued to serve in the first Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–02).

1802 United Kingdom general election First election after the union of the United Kingdom and Ireland

The 1802 United Kingdom general election was the election to the House of Commons of the second Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was the first to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. The first Parliament had been composed of members of the former Parliaments of the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland.

He took a keen interest in the history and literature of Wales and was elected the second chairman of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion

The Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, often called simply the Cymmrodorion, is a London-based Welsh learned society, with membership open to all. It was first established in 1751 as a social, cultural, literary and philanthropic institution. It fell into abeyance between 1787 and 1820, and again between 1843 and 1873. In its second and third incarnations its interests have been predominantly cultural and antiquarian. The present society claims continuity from that founded in 1751, although the three successive societies have in fact been slightly different in character and aims.

He died in a coffeehouse on Ludgate Hill, which was situated within the boundaries of the Fleet Prison where he had been imprisoned for debt.

Coffeehouse Establishment serving coffee

A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or café is an establishment that primarily serves coffee, related coffee drinks, and – depending on country – other drinks including alcoholic. Some coffeehouses may serve cold drinks such as iced coffee and iced tea; in continental Europe, cafés serve alcoholic drinks. A coffeehouse may also serve some type of food, such as light snacks, sandwiches, muffins or other pastries. Coffeehouses range from owner-operated small businesses to large multinational corporations.

Ludgate Hill hill and street in the City of London, England

Ludgate Hill is a hill in the City of London, near the old Ludgate, a gate to the City that was taken down, with its attached gaol, in 1780. It is the site of St. Paul's Cathedral, traditionally said to have been the site of a Roman temple of the goddess Diana. It is one of the three ancient hills of London, the others being Tower Hill and Cornhill. The highest point is just north of St. Paul's, at 17.6 metres (58 ft) above sea level.

Fleet Prison 12th-century prison in London

Fleet Prison was a notorious London prison by the side of the River Fleet. The prison was built in 1197, was rebuilt several times, and was in use until 1844. It was demolished in 1846.

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References

  1. 1 2 Lewis Namier; John Brooke (1985). The House of Commons 1754-1790. Boydell & Brewer. p. 40. ISBN   978-0-436-30420-0.
  2. "Lewes, Watkin (LWS759W)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  3. 1 2 3 Stooks Smith, Henry (1973) [1844–1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 210. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
George Hayley
Nathaniel Newnham
John Sawbridge
Frederick Bull
Member of Parliament for the City of London
17811796
With: Frederick Bull to 1784
Nathaniel Newnham to 1790
John Sawbridge to 1795
Brook Watson 1784–93
William Curtis 1790–1818
John William Anderson 1793–1806
William Lushington 1795–1802
Succeeded by
Harvey Christian Combe
William Curtis
John William Anderson
William Lushington