Watkins–Coleman House

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Watkins–Coleman House

Watkins-Coleman House.jpg

Watkins–Coleman House in 1968
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Location 5 E. Main St., Midway, Utah
Coordinates 40°30′45″N111°28′16″W / 40.51250°N 111.47111°W / 40.51250; -111.47111 Coordinates: 40°30′45″N111°28′16″W / 40.51250°N 111.47111°W / 40.51250; -111.47111
Area 1.6 acres (0.65 ha)
Built 1869 (1869)
Architect Watkins,John
NRHP reference # 71000858 [1]
Added to NRHP May 14, 1971

The Watkins–Coleman House was designed and built by John Watkins in 1869 in Midway, Utah. Watkins, trained as an architect in England, emigrated to the United States in 1856 to house his polygamist family. In 1903 the house was sold to Henry T. Coleman. The 2-1/2 story Carpenter Gothic house was built in red brick, with extensive scroll-cut ornamentation on the eaves. Corners are accented with contrasting white sandstone quoins. The steeply-pitched roof is covered in green-stained wood shingles. [2]

John Watkins (architect) Anglo-American architect

John Watkins was a practical architect and builder in London and Utah.

Midway, Utah City in Utah, United States

Midway is a city in northwestern Wasatch County, Utah, United States. It is located in the Heber Valley, approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Heber City and 28 miles (45 km) southeast of Salt Lake City, on the opposite side of the Wasatch Mountains. The population was 3,845 at the 2010 census.

Polygamy is the practice of marrying multiple spouses. When a man is married to more than one wife at a time, sociologists call this polygyny. When a woman is married to more than one husband at a time, it is called polyandry. If a marriage includes multiple husbands and wives, it can be called a group marriage or mixed-orientation marriage.

The Watkins–Coleman House was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on May 14, 1971. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Smith, Melvin T. (February 22, 1971). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form: Watkins–Coleman House". National Park Service.