Watkins Island

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Watkins
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Watkins
Location in Antarctica
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 66°22′S67°05′W / 66.367°S 67.083°W / -66.367; -67.083 Coordinates: 66°22′S67°05′W / 66.367°S 67.083°W / -66.367; -67.083
Archipelago Biscoe Islands
Length8 km (5 mi)
Administration
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System

Watkins Island is a low lying, ice-covered island 5 miles (8 km) long, lying 3 miles (5 km) SW of Lavoisier Island in the Biscoe Islands. The island was first mapped by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1903–05 and 1908–10, but remained unnamed until resighted by the BGLE under Rymill, 1934–37. He gave the name Mikkelsen Island after Ejnar Mikkelsen, Danish Arctic explorer. In applying the name, Rymill was unaware of the existence of Mikkelsen Islands 75 mi (121 km) southwestward, named in 1908–10 by Charcot. To avoid confusion of the two, the UK-APC recommended in 1952 that the Rymill naming be amended. The new name, Watkins Island, commemorates Gino Watkins, leader of the British Arctic Air Route Expedition, 1930–31. A new feature, Mikkelsen Bay, has been named for Ejnar Mikkelsen.

Lavoisier Island

Lavoisier Island is an island 29 km (18 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide, lying between Rabot and Watkins Islands in the Biscoe Islands, Antarctica. It is separated from Renaud Island and Rabot Island to the northeast by Pendleton Strait, from Watkins Island to the southwest by Lewis Sound, and from Krogh Island to the west-southwest by Vladigerov Passage.

Biscoe Islands archipelago

Biscoe Islands is a series of islands, of which the principal ones are Renaud, Lavoisier, Watkins, Krogh, Pickwick and Rabot, lying parallel to the west coast of Graham Land and extending 150 km (81 nmi) between Southwind Passage on the northeast and Matha Strait on the southwest. Another group of islands are the Adolph Islands.

The French Antarctic Expedition is any of several French expeditions in Antarctica.

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Renaud Island

Renaud Island is an ice-covered island, 40 km (25 mi) long and from 6.4 to 16.1 km wide, lying between the Pitt Islands and Rabot Island in the Biscoe Islands of Antarctica. It is separated from Pitt Islands to the northeast by Mraka Sound, and from Lavoisier Island to the southwest by Pendleton Strait. Zubov Bay is a 2.5 mile bay that indents the east side of the island.

Mikkelsen Bay is a bay, 27.8 kilometres (15 nmi) wide at its mouth and indenting 18.5 kilometres (10 nmi), entered between Bertrand Ice Piedmont and Cape Berteaux along the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. First seen from a distance in 1909 by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, but not recognized as a large bay. First surveyed in 1936 by the BGLE under Rymill, and resurveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1948-49. The name was proposed by members of BGLE for Ejnar Mikkelsen, Danish Arctic explorer and Inspector for East Greenland, 1934-50.

Mikkelsen Islands

The Mikkelsen Islands are a small group of islands and rocks lying off the southeast coast of Adelaide Island, 4 kilometres (2 nmi) southeast of the Léonie Islands. They were discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot in 1908–10 and named by him for Otto Mikkelsen, the Norwegian diver who inspected the damaged hull of the Pourquoi-Pas at Deception Island.

Ejnar Mikkelsen Danish explorer and writer

Ejnar Mikkelsen (1880–1971), was a Danish polar explorer and author. He is most known for his expeditions to Greenland.

Bigourdan Fjord is a sound, 12 miles (19 km) long in an east-west direction and averaging 2 miles (3 km) wide, lying between Pourquoi Pas Island and the southwest part of Arrowsmith Peninsula, along the west coast of Graham Land. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1908–10, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named by him for Guillaume Bigourdan, a noted French astronomer. It was roughly surveyed by the British Graham Land Expedition, 1934–37, under John Riddoch Rymill, and resurveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, 1948–50.

Pourquoi Pas Island

Pourquoi Pas Island is a mountainous island, 27 km (17 mi) long and from 8 to 18 km wide, lying between Bigourdan Fjord and Bourgeois Fjord off the west coast of Graham Land. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot, 1908-10. The island was charted more accurately by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Rymill, 1934–37, who named it for Charcot's expedition ship, the Pourquoi-Pas.

Bourgeois Fjord landform

Bourgeois Fjord is an inlet, 30 miles (50 km) long in a northeast–southwest direction and 3 to 5 miles wide, lying between the east sides of Pourquoi Pas Island and Blaiklock Island and the west coast of Graham Land. It separates Loubet Coast to the north from Fallières Coast to the south. The fjord was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1908–10, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named by him for Colonel Joseph E. Bourgeois, Director of the Geographic Service of the French Army. The outline of this inlet was more accurately delineated in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill.

John Rymill Australian explorer

John Riddoch Rymill was an Australian polar explorer, who had the rare second clasp added to his Polar Medal.

Cape Berteaux is a cape surmounted by a high rock peak between Mikkelsen Bay and Wordie Ice Shelf on the west coast of Graham Land. The French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot, 1908–1910, originally applied the name Berteaux to an island in essentially this position. The British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill, 1934–1937, identified the feature sighted by Charcot as the cape described above. It is named by Charcot for a Monsieur Berteaux who helped obtain funds for his expedition.

Anagram Islands

The Anagram Islands are a group of small islands and rocks lying between Roca Islands and Argentine Islands, in the Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. The area was charted by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Adrien de Gerlache, 1897–99, the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1903–05 and 1908–10, and the British Graham Land Expedition under John Riddoch Rymill, 1934–37. The names Argentine, Roca and Cruls were variously applied to the four island groups on the south side of French Passage. The islands were mapped in detail by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey from photos taken from the helicopter of HMS Protector and from information obtained by the British Naval Hydrographic Survey Unit in 1958, and the three names positioned as originally given by the Belgian and French expeditions. The remaining island group was named Anagram Islands by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959, anagram meaning a transposition of parts.

The Baudin Peaks are a group of peaks rising above 750 metres (2,460 ft), standing at the southeast corner of Mikkelsen Bay, immediately southwest of the mouth of Clarke Glacier, and 9 nautical miles (17 km) east-northeast of Cape Berteaux, on the west coast of Graham Land. This general area was first sighted and roughly charted in 1909 by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, who gave the name "Cap Pierre Baudin" to a cape in this vicinity. The peaks themselves were roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, but no name was assigned to them. They were resurveyed in 1948–49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, who subsequently identified them as the feature named "Cap Pierre Baudin" by Charcot. Charcot gave the name for Pierre Baudin, then port engineer at Pernambuco, where the Pourquoi-Pas put in on her return from the Antarctic.

Uruguay Island island in Antarctica

Uruguay Island is an island 1 km (0.62 mi) long with a cove indenting its west side, lying between Irizar Island and Corner Island in the Argentine Islands of the Wilhelm Archipelago of Antarctica. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition of 1903–05, under J.B. Charcot who named it after the Argentine corvette ARA Uruguay. The island was recharted in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Rymill.

Mount Nicholas is a mountain, 1,465 m, standing 5.5 nautical miles (10 km) south-southwest of Cape Brown and forming the northern limit of the Douglas Range on the east side of Alexander Island, Antarctica.

Waldeck-Rousseau Peak mountain in Antarctica

Waldeck-Rousseau Peak is a conspicuous monolith 3 nautical miles (6 km) east-northeast of Cape Evensen on Stresher Peninsula on Graham Coast, Antarctic Peninsula. The French Antarctic Expedition (1903–05) under Jean-Baptiste Charcot charted a cape in this area which they named for French statesman Pierre Waldeck-Rousseau. On re-exploring this area, the French Antarctic Expedition (1908–10) under Charcot sighted the feature from Pendleton Strait, 25 nautical miles (46 km) distant, and charted it as an island near the coast. Correlating its work with that of Charcot, the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Rymill charted this portion of the coast by land and from the air in 1935. Waldeck-Rousseau Peak as here applied is in accord with the interpretation of the BGLE.

DHainaut Island

D'Hainaut Island is a small island lying in Mikkelsen Harbor, Trinity Island, in the Palmer Archipelago. It was charted by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1908–10, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named by the sixth Chilean Antarctic Expedition (1952) for Lieutenant Ladislao D'Hainaut.

Mount Edgell mountain in Antarctica

Mount Edgell is a mountain, 1,675 metres (5,500 ft) high, rising eastward of Cape Jeremy, the east side of the north entrance to George VI Sound, on the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition of 1908–10 under Jean-Baptiste Charcot. Charcot saw it first from a great distance and thinking it to be an island, he named it "Ile Gordon Bennett" for James Gordon Bennett, Jr. of the New York Herald, who gave financial aid to the expedition. The British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, surveying this area in 1936–37 and finding no island, applied the name Mount Edgell to the feature now recognized as Charcot's "Ile Gordon Bennett." The name Mount Edgell, after Sir John Augustine Edgell, Hydrographer of the Navy from 1932–45, has since become established through international usage.

Ryder Bay is a bay 6 nautical miles (11 km) wide at its mouth and indenting 4 nautical miles (7 km), lying 5 nautical miles (9 km) east of Mount Gaudry on the southeast coast of Adelaide Island. The Leonie Islands lie across the mouth of this bay. Discovered and first surveyed in 1909 by the French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot. Resurveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill, and in 1948 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The bay is named for Lisle C.D. Ryder, second mate on the Penola during the BGLE, 1934-37. Ives Bank is a submarine bank in the Bellingshausen Sea on the southern approaches to Ryder Bay.

Lagoon Island

Lagoon Island is the northernmost of the Léonie Islands, lying in the entrance to Ryder Bay on the southeast side of Adelaide Island, Antarctica. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1908–10, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot. The island was charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill in February 1936 and was so named because with the island on its west side it forms a lagoon.

LĂ©onie Islands

The Léonie Islands are a group of small islands lying in the entrance to Ryder Bay along the southeast side of Adelaide Island, Antarctica. The French Antarctic Expedition, 1908–10, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, discovered these islands and gave the name Léonie Island to the largest island in the group. The British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, 1934–37, extended the coverage of the name to the entire group.