Watkins Manor House

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Watkins Manor House
Paul Watkins House

Watkins Manor House 01.jpg

The Paul Watkins House viewed from the north
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Location 175 East Wabasha Street, Winona, Minnesota
Coordinates 44°2′49.3″N91°38′7.6″W / 44.047028°N 91.635444°W / 44.047028; -91.635444 Coordinates: 44°2′49.3″N91°38′7.6″W / 44.047028°N 91.635444°W / 44.047028; -91.635444
Area 4 acres (1.6 ha)
Built 1924–27
Architect Cram & Ferguson
Architectural style Jacobethan
NRHP reference # 84000255 [1]
Designated  November 8, 1984

The Watkins Manor House is a historic mansion in Winona, Minnesota, United States. It was built from 1924 to 1927 for Paul Watkins (1865–1931), second-generation leader of the J.R. Watkins Company and progenitor of its famous door-to-door sales strategy. It was designed in the Jacobethan style by architect Ralph Adams Cram. [2] The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 as the Paul Watkins House for having local significance in the themes of architecture and commerce. [3] It was nominated for its associations with Paul Watkins and the Watkins Company, and for its architecture, being a rare and unaltered example of a house designed by an architect better known for his churches and institutional buildings. [2]

Winona, Minnesota City in Minnesota, United States

Winona is a city in and the county seat of Winona County, in the state of Minnesota. Located in picturesque bluff country on the Mississippi River, its most noticeable physical landmark is Sugar Loaf. The city is named after legendary figure Winona, said to have been the first-born daughter of Chief Wapasha (Wabasha) III. The total population of the city was estimated to be 27,592 at the time of the 2018 census.

Watkins Incorporated manufacturer of health remedies, baking products, and other household items

Watkins Incorporated is a manufacturer of health remedies, baking products, and other household items. The entire catalog includes 400 products. It is based in Winona, Minnesota, United States, which utilizes an Omni channel marketing strategy which includes a national retail sales force which focuses on selling to the retail channel as well as an independent sales force of 25,000 people to distribute its products. This independent sales force sells the products using various methods, including the Internet, person to person, trade shows, party planning, and fund-raising. In order to increase overall awareness for the brand, the company began offering products in national retail outlets such as Walmart, Target, Walgreens, Kroger and other mass, drug and grocery retail stores in 2005.

Door-to-door is a canvassing technique that is generally used for sales, marketing, advertising, or campaigning, in which the person or persons walk from the door of one house to the door of another, trying to sell or advertise a product or service to the general public or gather information. People who use this sales approach are often called traveling salesmen, or the archaic name drummer, to "drum up" business. This technique is also sometimes called direct sales. A variant of this involves cold calling first, when another sales representative attempts to gain agreement that a salesperson should visit.

Contents

The manor is now part of a senior housing complex, containing apartments and community spaces. [4]

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Winona County, Minnesota Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Winona County, Minnesota. It is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Winona County, Minnesota, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in an online map.

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References

  1. National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 Frame III, Robert M. (August 1984). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Watkins, Paul, House". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-07-17.
  3. "Watkins, Paul, House". Minnesota National Register Properties Database. Minnesota Historical Society. 2009. Retrieved 2017-09-17.
  4. "Senior Living at Watkins". Winona Health. 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-17.