Watlack Hills

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Watlack Hills ( 79°26′S85°22′W / 79.433°S 85.367°W / -79.433; -85.367 Coordinates: 79°26′S85°22′W / 79.433°S 85.367°W / -79.433; -85.367 ) is a line of mainly ice-free hills, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, bounded by the White Escarpment, Splettstoesser Glacier, and Dobbratz Glacier, in the Heritage Range. Named by the University of Minnesota Geological Party to these mountains, 1963–64, for Chief Warrant Officer Richard G. Watlack, pilot with the 62nd Transportation Detachment, who assisted the party.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

White Escarpment

White Escarpment is an escarpment in the west part of the Heritage Range, extending for 15 nautical miles (28 km) between the heads of the Splettstoesser and Dobbratz Glaciers. Named by the University of Minnesota Geological Party to these mountains, 1963–64, for Chief Warrant Officer Ronald B. White, pilot with the 62nd Transportation Detachment, who assisted the party.

Splettstoesser Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Splettstoesser Glacier is a glacier, 35 nautical miles long, draining from the plateau just south of Founders Escarpment and flowing east-northeast through the Heritage Range to the south of Founders Peaks and Anderson Massif to enter the Minnesota Glacier. Named by the University of Minnesota Ellsworth Mountains Party which explored the area in 1961-62 for John F. Splettstoesser, geologist with that party.

See also

Geographical features include:

Carnell Peak is a peak, 1,730 metres (5,680 ft) high, in the Watlack Hills, situated 2.5 nautical miles (5 km) from the southeast end of the group, in the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant D.L. Carnell, Civil Engineer Corps, U.S. Navy, maintenance officer at Williams Field, McMurdo Sound, in the 1965–66 season, who was responsible for the first piercing of the Ross Ice Shelf at 50 meters.

Dobbratz Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Dobbratz Glacier is a broad tributary glacier which drains the south part of the White Escarpment and flows northeast between the Watlack Hills and the Webers Peaks into Splettstoesser Glacier, in the Heritage Range. It was named by the University of Minnesota Geological Party, 1963–64, for Major Joseph Dobbratz, a United States Marine Corps pilot who supported the party.

Mount Twiss is a peak at the north end of Watlack Hills in the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos from 1961-66. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after John R. Twiss, Jr. Twiss served on the support staff at McMurdo Station from 1961–63, was a United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) Representative at McMurdo Station in the 1964-65 season, a USARP Representative on USNS Eltanin Cruise 34 in 1968, staff of the National Science Foundation (NSF) International Decade of Ocean Exploration from 1970–74, and Executive Director of the Marine Mammal Commission from 1974.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Watlack Hills" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Zaneveld Glacier is a broad tributary glacier, flowing from the polar plateau northwest between Roberts Massif and Cumulus Hills to enter the upper part of Shackleton Glacier. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Jacques S. Zaneveld, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at McMurdo Station, 1963–64 and 1964–65, who participated in the cruise of the USS Glacier, January–March 1965.

Gifford Peaks mountain range

Gifford Peaks are a line of sharp peaks and ridges along the escarpment at the west side of the Heritage Range, located between Watlack Hills and Soholt Peaks. They were named by the University of Minnesota Geological Party of 1963–64 for Chief Warrant Officer Leonard A. Gifford, a pilot of the 62nd Transportation Detachment who aided the party.

Bell Peak is a peak, 1,620 metres (5,300 ft) high, surmounting a southeast trending spur of the Herbert Range, just southwest of Sargent Glacier. The peak was probably observed by Roald Amundsen's south polar party in 1911, and was later roughly mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for G. Grant Bell who studied cosmic rays at McMurdo Station, winter party 1962.

The Berry Peaks are a small group of peaks 10 nautical miles (19 km) south of the terminus of Reedy Glacier, between the southeast edge of the Ross Ice Shelf and the Watson Escarpment. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for William Berry, a radioman in the Byrd Station winter party of 1961.

Burgess Glacier is a glacier, 7 nautical miles (13 km) long, flowing northwest through Otway Massif to enter Mill Stream Glacier. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Robert W. Burgess, a United States Antarctic Research Program ionospheric physicist at South Pole Station, 1963.

Conard Peak is a peak, 2,230 metres (7,320 ft) high, along the north side of Hearfield Glacier, about 5 nautical miles (9 km) north of Aldridge Peak, in the Cartographers Range, Victory Mountains, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Ralph W. Conard, a member of the aircraft ground handling crew with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 at Williams Field, Ross Island, during Operation Deep Freeze 1968.

Webers Peaks is a line of peaks on a ridge bounded by Splettstoesser Glacier on the north, Balish Glacier on the east and Dobbratz and Fendorf Glaciers on the west, in the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains. They were named by the University of Minnesota Ellsworth Mountains Party of 1962–63 for geologist Gerald F. Webers, a member of that party.

The Gross Hills are the line of rugged hills and peaks located east of Schmidt Glacier, in the Heritage Range of Antarctica. They were named by the University of Minnesota Geological Party, 1963–64, for Barton Gross, a geologist with the party.

Grimes Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Grimes Glacier is a steep glacier descending from the east side of Anderson Massif, in the Heritage Range of the Ellsworth Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Master Chief Equipmentman Paul D. Grimes, U.S. Navy, who supervised the construction crews during relocation of Williams Air Field at McMurdo Sound in the closing month of U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze 1965.

Gowan Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Gowan Glacier is a glacier about 15 nautical miles long in the Heritage Range of the Ellsworth Mountains of Antarctica, flowing north from the vicinity of Cunningham Peak in the Founders Escarpment to enter Minnesota Glacier just east of Welcome Nunatak. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Jimmy L. Gowan, U.S. Navy Medical Corps, officer in charge and doctor at Plateau Station in 1966.

Plummer Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Plummer Glacier is a short glacier descending east through the Enterprise Hills to the north of Lippert Peak and the Douglas Peaks, in the Heritage Range in Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Charles C. Plummer, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) glaciologist at Palmer Station in 1965.

The Edson Hills are a group of mainly ice-free hills lying south of Drake Icefall and west of Union Glacier in the Heritage Range of the Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica. They were named by the University of Minnesota Ellsworth Mountains Party, 1962–63, for Dean T. Edson, a United States Geological Survey topographic engineer with the party.

Feeley Peak is a peak, 1,730 metres (5,680 ft) high, standing 3 nautical miles (6 km) northwest of Sheets Peak, between Davisville Glacier and Quonset Glacier on the north side of the Wisconsin Range in Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Keith E. Feeley, a construction mechanic in the Byrd Station winter party, 1959.

Foreman Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Foreman Glacier is a glacier flowing south-southeast from the Havre Mountains in the northern portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. It drains the southwest slopes of Dimitrova Peak and the west slopes of Breze Peak and flows into Palestrina Glacier north of Balan Ridge in Sofia University Mountains. The glacier was surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1975–76, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1980 after David Alexander Foreman, a BAS aircraft mechanic at Adelaide Station, 1973–76.

Goff Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Goff Glacier is a broad glacier flowing from Parker Peak into the head of Koether Inlet on the north side of Thurston Island, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Lieutenant Robert G. Goff, co-pilot of PBM Mariner aircraft in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of Thurston Island and adjacent coastal areas, 1946–47.

Harbour Glacier

Harbour Glacier is a through glacier 3 nautical miles (6 km) long and 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) wide, lying on the northwest side of Wiencke Island and extending in a northeast direction from Port Lockroy to the cove 1 nautical mile (2 km) east of Noble Peak, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was probably first seen by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Gerlache. The glacier was charted in 1944 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, who so named it because of its proximity to the harbour of Port Lockroy.

Roe Glacier is a tributary glacier, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, flowing northwest through the Tapley Mountains to enter Scott Glacier just south of Mount Durham. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Derrell M. Roe, a member of summer parties at McMurdo Station in 1963-64 and 1964–65 and station engineer with the McMurdo winter party in 1966.

Schmidt Glacier (Antarctica)

Schmidt Glacier is a glacier, 20 nautical miles long, in the Pioneer Heights of the Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica. The glacier originates near Hall Peak and drains north along the west side of Thompson Escarpment and Gross Hills to coalesce with the lower part of Splettstoesser Glacier, north of Mount Virginia. It was named by the University of Minnesota Ellsworth Mountains Party, 1961-62, for Paul G. Schmidt, geologist with the party.