Watson Creek (Neshaminy Creek tributary)

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Watson Creek
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Watson Creek
Location
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Bucks
Township Buckingham
Physical characteristics
Source 
 - coordinates 40°20′4″N75°4′50″W / 40.33444°N 75.08056°W / 40.33444; -75.08056
 - elevation360 feet (110 m)
Mouth  
 - coordinates
40°18′50″N75°3′22″W / 40.31389°N 75.05611°W / 40.31389; -75.05611 Coordinates: 40°18′50″N75°3′22″W / 40.31389°N 75.05611°W / 40.31389; -75.05611
 - elevation
207 feet (63 m)
Length2.48 miles (3.99 km)
Basin size4.26 square miles (11.0 km2)
Basin features
ProgressionWatson Creek → Mill CreekNeshaminy CreekDelaware RiverDelaware Bay
River system Delaware River
Slope61.69 feet per mile (11.684 m/km)

Watson Creek is a tributary of Mill Creek (Neshaminy Creek, Delaware River, Wrightstown Township), Bucks County, Pennsylvania., [1] contained totally in Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania flows to its confluence with Lahaska Creek to form Mill Creek. The Geographic Name Information System I.D. is 1190689, [2] U.S. Department of the Interior Geological Survey I.D. is 02626. [3]

Bucks County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Bucks County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 625,249, making it the fourth-most populous county in Pennsylvania and the 99th-most populous county in the United States. The county seat is Doylestown. The county is named after the English county of Buckinghamshire or more precisely, its shortname.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern, Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania Township in Pennsylvania, United States

Buckingham Township is a township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 20,075 at the 2010 census. Buckingham takes its name from Buckingham in Buckinghamshire, England. Buckingham Township was once known as Greenville and was once the historic county seat of the English Bucks County.

Contents

History

Watson Creek was named for the Watson family. Henry Watson was the owner of a large farm at the source who had three grist mills and a sawmill.

Gristmill mill; grinds grain into flour

A gristmill grinds cereal grain into flour and middlings. The term can refer to both the grinding mechanism and the building that holds it.

Sawmill facility where logs are cut into timber

A sawmill or lumber mill is a facility where logs are cut into lumber. Modern saw mills use a motorized saw to cut logs lengthwise to make long pieces, and crosswise to length depending on standard or custom sizes. The "portable" saw mill is iconic and of simple operation—the logs lay flat on a steel bed and the motorized saw cuts the log horizontally along the length of the bed, by the operator manually pushing the saw. The most basic kind of saw mill consists of a chainsaw and a customized jig, with similar horizontal operation.

Course

Watson Creek rises a short distance east of Doylestown Borough meandering generally south-southeast then turns and flows northeastward to Mill Creek's 6.05 river mile where it is joined by Lahaska Creek. [4]

River mile

In the United States, a river mile is a measure of distance in miles along a river from its mouth. River mile numbers begin at zero and increase further upstream. The corresponding metric unit using kilometers is the river kilometer. They are analogous to vehicle roadway mile markers, except that river miles are rarely marked on the physical river; instead they are marked on navigation charts, and topographic maps. Riverfront properties are sometimes partially legally described by their river mile.

Geology

Appalachian Mountains mountain range in the eastern United States and Canada

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps and the Rocky Mountains before experiencing natural erosion. The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east–west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east–west.

Piedmont (United States) plateau region located in the eastern United States

The Piedmont is a plateau region located in the Eastern United States. It sits between the Atlantic coastal plain and the main Appalachian Mountains, stretching from New Jersey in the north to central Alabama in the south. The Piedmont Province is a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian division which consists of the Gettysburg-Newark Lowlands, the Piedmont Upland and the Piedmont Lowlands sections.

Geology of Pennsylvania

The Geology of Pennsylvania consists of six distinct physiographic provinces, three of which are subdivided into different sections. Each province has its own economic advantages and geologic hazards and plays an important role in shaping everyday life in the state. They are: the Atlantic Coastal Plain Province, the Piedmont Province, the New England Province, the Ridge and Valley Province, the Appalachian Plateau Province, and the Central Lowlands Province.

Watson Creek begins in the Stockton Conglomerate, laid down during the Triassic, mineralogy includes conglomerate of quartz cobbles and boulders, and sandstone. Next, it flows through the Stockton Formation, also from the Triassic, consisting of sandstone, arckosic sandstone, shale, siltstone, and mudstone. Next, it passes through the Beekmantown Group, deposited during the Ordovician, and consists of limestone and dolomite with some chert and calcite. Lastly, it meets with the Lahaska Creek in the Allentown Formation, which was deposited during the Cambrian, consisting of dolomite, limestone, chert, siltstone, with some oölites, stromatolites, and sharpstone. [5]

Municipalities

Crossings and Bridges

[6]

CrossingNBI NumberLengthLanesSpansMaterial/DesignBuiltReconstructedLatitudeLongitude
Pennsylvania Route 263 (York Road)693021 feet (6.4 m)21concrete cast-in-place, bituminous surface1952
Mill Road752636.1 feet (11.0 m)21concrete arch-deck, concrete span, concrete cast-in-place1912
U.S. Route 202 (Doylestown Buckingham Pike)
Church Road

See also

Related Research Articles

Tohickon Creek river in the United States of America

Tohickon Creek is a 29.5-mile-long (47.5 km) tributary of the Delaware River. Located entirely in Bucks County, in southeastern Pennsylvania, it rises in Springfield Township and has its confluence with the Delaware at Point Pleasant. It is dammed to form Lake Nockamixon.

Neshaminy Creek river in the United States of America

Neshaminy Creek is a 40.7-mile-long (65.5 km) stream that runs entirely through Bucks County, Pennsylvania, rising south of the borough of Chalfont, where its north and west branches join. Neshaminy Creek flows southeast toward Bristol Township and Bensalem Township to its confluence with the Delaware River. The name "Neshaminy" originates with the Lenni Lenape and is thought to mean "place where we drink twice". This phenomenon refers to a section of the creek known as the Neshaminy Palisades, where the course of the water slows and changes direction at almost a right angle, nearly forcing the water back upon itself. These palisades are located in Dark Hollow Park, operated by the county, and are flanked by Warwick Township to the south and Buckingham Township to the north.

Pennsylvania Route 263 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 263 is a north–south state highway located in southeast Pennsylvania. The southern terminus of the route is at PA 611 in Willow Grove, Montgomery County. The northern terminus is at the Centre Bridge-Stockton Bridge over the Delaware River in Centre Bridge, Bucks County, where it continues into Stockton, New Jersey as Bridge Street to an intersection with Route 29. It follows the routing of Old York Road, a historic road that connected Philadelphia to New York City, and carries the name York Road from the southern terminus to Lahaska and Upper York Road north of there. From Willow Grove to Buckingham, PA 263 runs mostly through suburban areas as a four-lane road, passing through Hatboro, Warminster, and Jamison. The route forms a concurrency with U.S. Route 202 and narrows to a two-lane road, splitting with that route in Lahaska. From here, the route continues through rural areas to Centre Bridge.

Newtown Creek (Neshaminy Creek tributary)


Newtown Creek is a tributary, rising near Stoop Road in Newtown Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is part of the Delaware River watershed and is located entirely in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The Newtown Creek Bridge over Centre Avenue was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Mill Creek (Neshaminy Creek tributary, Northampton Township)

Mill Creek is a tributary of Neshaminy Creek rising in Upper Southampton Township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is one of at least six creeks in Bucks County bearing the same name. The upper portion of Mill Creek was formerly known as Broad Axe Creek.

Pine Run (Mill Creek, Neshaminy Creek tributary)

Pine Creek is a tributary of Mill Creek, which, in turn, is a tributary of the Neshaminy Creek, part of the Delaware River watershed.

Ironworks Creek stream in Bucks County, United States of America

Ironworks Creek is a tributary of Mill Creek in Northampton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, part of the Neshaminy Creek, and of the Delaware River watersheds.

Mill Creek (Neshaminy Creek tributary, Wrightstown Township)


Mill Creek is a tributary of Neshaminy Creek, one of three tributaries of the Neshaminy which all share the same name, and one of six in Bucks County, Pennsylvania which share the name. The Geographic Name Information System I.D. is 1181118, U.S. Department of the Interior Geological Survey I.D. is 02596.

Robin Run


Robin Run is a tributary of Mill Creek, rising in Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania flows generally southeast to its confluence with Mill Creek in Wrightstown Township. The Geographic Name Information System I.D. is 1185219, U.S. Department of the Interior Geological Survey I.D. is 02598.

Lahaska Creek stream in Wrightstown Township, United States of America

Lahaska Creek is a tributary of Mill Creek in Wrightstown Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The Geographic Name Information System I.D. is 1178763, U.S. Department of the Interior Geological Survey I.D. is 02632.

Pine Run (North Branch Neshaminy Creek)

Pine Run is a tributary of the North Branch Neshaminy Creek, part of the Delaware River watershed. Pine Run flows entirely in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, rising in Plumstead Township, passing through Buckingham Township and New Britain Township, meeting its confluence with the North Branch in the Borough of Chalfont.

Paunnacussing Creek (Delaware River)


Paunnacussing Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River contained wholly within Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It rises from a pond north of Mechanicsville, in Buckingham Township and drains into the Delaware at Bull Island just upstream of Lumberville in Solebury Township.

Core Creek (Neshaminy Creek)

Core Creek is a tributary of the Neshaminy Creek in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Rising in Lower Makefield Township, it flows in the Stockton Formation until it meets its confluence with the Neshaminy in Middletown Township. At one time it powered seven mills along its length.

Wolf Run (Tohickon Creek)

Deep Run is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Bedminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Deer Run (Tohickon Creek)

Deer Run is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Bedminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Threemile Run (Tohickon Creek)

Threemile Run is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States and is part of the Delaware River watershed.

Falls Creek (Delaware River)

Falls Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River wholly contained in Bridgeton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The creek boasts the highest falls in Bucks County.

Cooks Creek (Delaware River)

Cooks Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in the United States, rising in Springfield Township and passing through Durham Township before emptying into the Pennsylvania Canal and the Delaware.

References

  1. MacReynolds, George, Place Names in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Doylestown, Bucks County Historical Society, Doylestown, PA, 1942, P1.
  2. http://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=gnispq:3:::NO::P3_FID:1185219
  3. http://www.lycoming.edu/cwi/pdfs/paGazetterOfStreams.pdf
  4. https://www.google.com/maps/place/Buckingham+Township,+PA/@40.3140358,-75.0582887,17.14z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89c401f726bc8b7b:0x384ca34de7e34ff4!8m2!3d40.3149535!4d-75.0494329
  5. "Pennsylvania Geological Survey". PaGEODE. Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  6. "National Bridge Inventory Data". UglyBridges. James Baughn. Retrieved 14 October 2017.