Watson Glacier

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Watson Glacier
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Watson Glacier
TypeMountain glacier
Coordinates 48°39′22″N121°34′55″W / 48.65611°N 121.58194°W / 48.65611; -121.58194 Coordinates: 48°39′22″N121°34′55″W / 48.65611°N 121.58194°W / 48.65611; -121.58194 [1]
Length1,150 ft (350 m)
TerminusBarren
StatusRetreating

Watson Glacier is in Snoqualmie National Forest in the U.S. state of Washington, on the north slope of Mount Watson. [2] Watson Glacier retreated 430 ft (130 m) between 1950 and 2007 and is now only 1,150 ft (350 m) in length. [3] Watson Glacier descends from 6,000 to 5,700 ft (1,800 to 1,700 m). [2]

Snoqualmie National Forest

Snoqualmie National Forest is a United States National Forest in the State of Washington. It was established on 1 July 1908, when an area of 961,120 acres was split from the existing Washington National Forest. Its size was increased on 13 October 1933, when a part of Rainier National Forest was added. In 1974 Snoqualmie was administratively combined with Mount Baker National Forest to make Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. In descending order of land area, Snoqualmie National Forest lies in parts of King, Snohomish, Pierce, and Kittitas counties. There are local ranger district offices in North Bend and Skykomish. Its main base is in Everett, Washington. As of 30 September 2007, it had an area of 1,258,167 acres, representing about 49 percent of the combined forest's total acreage.

Washington (state) State of the United States of America

Washington, officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Named for George Washington, the first president of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty in the settlement of the Oregon boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital; the state's largest city is Seattle. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.

See also

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Sulphide Glacier glacier in Washington state, United States

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Middle Cascade Glacier glacier in the United States

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Daniel Glacier glacier in the United States

Daniel Glacier is in Wenatchee National Forest in the U.S. state of Washington and is on the north slope of Mount Daniel. Daniel Glacier retreated almost 500 m (1,600 ft) between 1950 and 2005. Daniel Glacier is separated from Lynch Glacier to the west by a ridge.

Foss Glacier glacier in the United States

Foss Glacier is within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness of Snoqualmie National Forest in the U.S. state of Washington and is on the northeast slope of Mount Hinman. Foss Glacier retreated almost 500 m (1,600 ft) between 1950 and 2005. Foss Glacier is separated from the nearly vanished Hinman Glacier to the west by a ridge.

Silver Glacier glacier in Washington state, United States

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Redoubt Glacier glacier in the United States

Redoubt Glacier is in North Cascades National Park in the U.S. state of Washington, on the east slopes of Mount Redoubt. Redoubt Glacier descends from the 8,400-foot (2,600 m) point on the east slope of Mount Redoubt then has a south terminus near 7,200 ft (2,200 m). The glacier then has a shallow gradient for most of its course before descending north on a wide 1.5 mi (2.4 km) front to 6,500 ft (2,000 m). Melt from the glacier feeds into Depot Creek which flows into Chilliwack Lake. The Depot Glacier lies to the west of Redoubt Glacier.

Depot Glacier (Washington) glacier in the United States

Depot Glacier is in North Cascades National Park in the U.S. state of Washington, on the northeast slopes of Mount Redoubt. Depot Glacier descends from the 7,400 to 6,000 ft. Melt from the glacier feeds into Depot Creek which flows into Chilliwack Lake. The Redoubt Glacier lies to the east while the West Depot Glacier is separated from Depot Glacier by a ridge.

West Depot Glacier glacier in Washington state, United States

West Depot Glacier is in North Cascades National Park in the U.S. state of Washington, on the north slopes of Mount Redoubt. Depot Glacier descends from 7,400 to 5,900 ft. Melt from the glacier feeds into Depot Creek which flows into Chilliwack Lake. A ridge separates West Depot Glacier from Depot Glacier to the east.

S Glacier glacier in Washington state, United States

S Glacier is in North Cascades National Park in the U.S. state of Washington, on the east slopes of Hurry-up Peak. S Glacier is disconnected in several spots. The uppermost sections terminate in icefalls, while the lower section ends in talus. Total descent of the glacier is from 7,600 to 5,500 ft. Yawning Glacier lies .75 mi (1.21 km) to the north.

References

  1. "Mount Watson". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  2. 1 2 Bacon Peak, WA (Map). TopoQwest (United States Geological Survey Maps). Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  3. Pelto, Mauri. "North Cascade Glacier Terminus Behavior". North Cascade Glacier Climate Project. Nichols College. Retrieved May 11, 2013.