Watson Heston

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Watson Heston's depiction of himself WatsonHeston.png
Watson Heston's depiction of himself

Watson Heston (September 25, 1846 January 27, 1905) [1] was an American Editorial cartoonist who peaked in popularity during the Golden Age of Freethought in the late 19th century.

Editorial cartoonist artist drawing editorial cartoons that contain political or social commentary

An editorial cartoonist, also known as a political cartoonist, is an artist who draws editorial cartoons that contain some level of political or social commentary. Their cartoons are used to convey and question an aspect of daily news or current affairs in a national or international context. Political cartoonists generally adopt a caricaturist style of drawing, to capture the likeness of a politician or subject. They may also employ humor or satire to ridicule an individual or group, emphasize their point of view or comment on a particular event.

The Golden Age of Freethought is the socio-political movement promoting freethought that developed in the mid 19th-century United States. The period roughly from 1875 to 1914 is referred to as "the high-water mark of freethought as an influential movement in American society". It began around 1856 and lasted at least through the end of the century; author Susan Jacoby places the end of the Golden Age at the start of World War I.

Contents

Biography

Born in Ohio, he spent the majority of his life in Carthage, Missouri. He published cartoons satirising the Republican party in People's Party publications, and his cartoons satirising religion in general and Christianity in particular, appeared in the famous freethought newspapers Truth Seeker, Etta Semple's Free-Thought Ideal, and other regional papers. [2] Later, he would write and illustrate The Old Testament Comically Illustrated (1892), [3] and The New Testament Comically Illustrated (1898), which caricature scenes from the Bible. In 1890, Heston published a critique of the involvement of religious clergy in politics, calling for strict separation of church and state. [4]

Ohio State of the United States of America

Ohio is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Of the fifty states, it is the 34th largest by area, the seventh most populous, and the tenth most densely populated. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus.

Carthage, Missouri City in Missouri, United States

Carthage is a city in Jasper County, Missouri, United States. The population was 14,378 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Jasper County and is nicknamed "America's Maple Leaf City."

Cartoon Form of two-dimensional illustrated visual art

A cartoon is a type of illustration, possibly animated, typically in a non-realistic or semi-realistic style. The specific meaning has evolved over time, but the modern usage usually refers to either: an image or series of images intended for satire, caricature, or humor; or a motion picture that relies on a sequence of illustrations for its animation. Someone who creates cartoons in the first sense is called a cartoonist, and in the second sense they are usually called an animator.

The Bible Comically Illustrated was published in 1900 by the Truth Seeker Company and sold at least 10,000 copies. Few copies of this book or his earlier works survive, as most were apparently destroyed by those who did not appreciate such blasphemy. His works can be found on sale from time to time, with the asking prices usually reaching $2,000.

Blasphemy is the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence to a deity, or sacred objects, or toward something considered sacred or inviolable.

Cartoons by Watson Heston
Famous among his caricatures of bible scenes are his depiction of Elisha watching two female bears mauling forty-two boys in 2 Kings 2:24. Heston-Elisha.png
Famous among his caricatures of bible scenes are his depiction of Elisha watching two female bears mauling forty-two boys in 2 Kings 2:24.
Famous among his caricatures of bible scenes are his depiction of Elisha watching two female bears mauling forty-two boys in 2 Kings 2:24. 
In another cartoon, Heston calls on readers to reflect on the incest between Lot and his daughters in Genesis 19:30-38. Heston-LotDaughters.png
In another cartoon, Heston calls on readers to reflect on the incest between Lot and his daughters in Genesis 19:30-38.
In another cartoon, Heston calls on readers to reflect on the incest between Lot and his daughters in Genesis 19:30-38. 
Heston caricatures Moses killing an Egyptian Heston-Moses1.png
Heston caricatures Moses killing an Egyptian
Heston caricatures Moses killing an Egyptian 
Heston caricatures the Ten Commandments, changing "thou shalt not commit adultery" to "thou shalt not do as the preachers are wont to do" Heston-10commandments.png
Heston caricatures the Ten Commandments, changing "thou shalt not commit adultery" to "thou shalt not do as the preachers are wont to do"
Heston caricatures the Ten Commandments, changing "thou shalt not commit adultery" to "thou shalt not do as the preachers are wont to do" 

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