Watson Nunatak

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Watson Nunatak ( 67°58′S62°45′E / 67.967°S 62.750°E / -67.967; 62.750 Coordinates: 67°58′S62°45′E / 67.967°S 62.750°E / -67.967; 62.750 ) is a nunatak standing between Price and Van Hulssen Nunataks in the Trilling Peaks, Framnes Mountains, in Mac. Robertson Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936-37. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for K.D. Watson, diesel mechanic at Mawson Station, who assisted in the Framnes Mountains--Depot Peak survey by ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) in 1965.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Nunatak Exposed, often rocky element of a ridge, mountain, or peak not covered with ice or snow within an ice field or glacier

A nunatak is an exposed, often rocky element of a ridge, mountain, or peak not covered with ice or snow within an ice field or glacier. They are also called glacial islands. Examples are natural pyramidal peaks. When rounded by glacial action, smaller rock promontories may be referred to as rognons.

Trilling Peaks is a group of linear nunataks: the three main peaks standing three miles south of South Masson Range in the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37, and named Trillingnutane.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Watson Nunatak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Prince Charles Mountains mountain range

The Prince Charles Mountains are a major group of mountains in Mac. Robertson Land in Antarctica, including the Athos Range, the Porthos Range, and the Aramis Range. The highest peak is Mount Menzies. Other prominent peaks are Mount Izabelle and Mount Stinear. These mountains together with other scattered peaks form an arc about 260 miles long, extending from the vicinity of Mount Starlight in the north to Goodspeed Nunataks in the south.

Framnes Mountains

The Framnes Mountains are an Antarctic mountain range consisting of Casey Range, Masson Range, David Range, and Brown Range, and adjacent peaks and mountains. The three major ranges and other lesser features were sighted and named in February 1931 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition under Douglas Mawson. This coast was also sighted by Norwegian whalers in the same season. The whole area was mapped in detail by Norwegian cartographers from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition in January 1937. This overall name for the several ranges was given by Lars Christensen after Framnesfjellet, a hill near Sandefjord, Norway.

Scott Mountains (Antarctica) mountain range in Antarctica

The Scott Mountains are a large number of isolated peaks lying south of Amundsen Bay in Enderby Land of East Antarctica, Antarctica. Discovered on 13 January 1930 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) under Sir Douglas Mawson. He named the feature Scott Range after Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Royal Navy. The term mountains is considered more appropriate because of the isolation of its individual features.

David Range

The David Range is a mountain range 5 miles (8 km) west of the Masson Range, which it parallels, in the Framnes Mountains of Antarctica. It extends 16 miles (26 km) in a north-northeast–south-southwest direction, with peaks rising to 1,500 metres (4,900 ft).

Price Nunatak is a nunatak marking the north end of the Trilling Peaks, 3 nautical miles (6 km) south of Mount Burnett in the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936-37. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for H. Price, senior diesel mechanic at Mawson Station in 1959.

Lawson Nunatak is a small tooth-like nunatak lying 2 nautical miles (4 km) southeast of Branson Nunatak in the Masson Range of the Framnes Mountains of Antarctica. The feature was fixed by intersection from trigonometrical stations by Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions in 1968. It was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for E. J. Lawson, a diesel mechanic at Mawson Station, who assisted with the survey work in 1967.

The Masson Range is a high broken chain of mountains, consisting primarily of the North Masson, Central Masson and South Masson Ranges and the Trilling Peaks, forming a part of the Framnes Mountains. Having several peaks over 1,000 metres (3,300 ft), the range extends in a north–south direction for 15 nautical miles (28 km). It was discovered and charted by the British Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition, 1929–31, under Douglas Mawson, and named for Professor Sir David Orme Masson, a member of the Advisory Committee for this expedition as well as the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911–14, also under Mawson. The mountains were first visited by an Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions party led by John Béchervaise in 1956.

Casey Range is a jagged, razor-backed ridge and a few nunataks in a line extending north-south, standing 8 miles west of David Range, in the Framnes Mountains. Discovered by the British Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), 1929–31, under Douglas Mawson, who named it for Rt. Hon. Richard G. Casey.

Woodberry Nunataks is a group of small nunataks 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) north of Lucas Nunatak in the Casey Range, Framnes Mountains. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936-37. Visited by an ANARE party in 1962 and named for B.D. Woodberry, ionosphere physicist at Mawson Station, a member of the field party.

The Binders Nunataks are two small, light-colored nunataks standing 37 nautical miles (69 km) north of Mount Scherger in the southern Prince Charles Mountains. They were mapped from air photos and surveys by the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions, 1957–60, and named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia after a fictional character in The Ascent of Rum Doodle, a novel by W. E. Bowman.

Branson Nunatak is a nunatak between Mount Burnett and Price Nunatak in the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37, and named Horntind. It was renamed by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for J. Branson, geophysicist at Mawson Station in 1962.

Walker Nunatak is a small nunatak 10 nautical miles (18 km) east of Branson Nunatak on the east edge of the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land. Photographed from ANARE aircraft in 1962, and seen by an ANARE dog-sledge party in January 1963. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for K.G. Walker, assistant cook at Mawson Station in 1962, a member of the sledge party.

Painted Peak is a prominent peak, 710 m, on the northern spur of the North Masson Range in the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936-37. Visited by an ANARE party in 1955, and so named because of its conspicuous red-brown coloring.

Smith Peaks is a group of peaks standing close south of Mount Hordern in the David Range of the Framnes Mountains. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936-37. Remapped by ANARE, 1957–60, and named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for F.A. Smith, diesel mechanic at Mawson Station, 1957.

Filson Nunatak is a small nunatak 6 nautical miles (11 km) east of Trost Peak in the eastern part of the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land, Antarctica. It was photographed from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) aircraft in 1958 and seen by an ANARE party in December 1962. It was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for R. Filson, a carpenter at Mawson Station in 1962, and a member of the party.

Fischer Nunatak is a nunatak, 750 metres (2,460 ft) high, standing 2 nautical miles (4 km) south of Mount Henderson in the northeast part of the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37, and named "Sornuten". It was renamed by the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions for H.J.L. Fischer, a cook at Mawson Station in 1958.

Gap Nunatak is a small nunatak, 1,030 metres (3,380 ft) high, standing in the center of Hordern Gap in the David Range of the Framnes Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37, and named "Metoppen". It was renamed by the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions for its location in Hordern Gap.

Lucas Nunatak is a nunatak 1 nautical mile (2 km) south of the Woodberry Nunataks in the Casey Range of the Framnes Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37, and was visited by an Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions party in April 1962. It was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for F.M. Lucas, officer in charge at Mawson Station in 1962.

Van Hulssen Nunatak is a nunatak at the south end of the Trilling Peaks in the Framnes Mountains, Mac. Robertson Land. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37, and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for Frits Van Hulssen, a technical officer (ionosphere) at Mawson Station in 1959.