Watson Peaks

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Watson Peaks ( 73°45′S62°36′W / 73.750°S 62.600°W / -73.750; -62.600 Coordinates: 73°45′S62°36′W / 73.750°S 62.600°W / -73.750; -62.600 ) is a linear group of peaks that trend in a NW-SE direction for 9 nautical miles (17 km), located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northeast of Rivera Peaks, in Palmer Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-67. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for George E. Watson, biologist on the Palmer Station-Eastwind Expedition, summer 1965-66; author of the handbook Birds of the Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic, 1975.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Rivera Peaks is a wedge-shaped range of peaks, 14 nautical miles (26 km) long, between Swann Glacier and Watson Peaks, in Palmer Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos in 1961-67 and named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for James P. Rivera, electronics technician at South Pole Station in 1967.

Palmer Land geographic region

Palmer Land is the portion of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica that lies south of a line joining Cape Jeremy and Cape Agassiz. This application of Palmer Land is consistent with the 1964 agreement between US-ACAN and UK-APC, in which the name Antarctic Peninsula was approved for the major peninsula of Antarctica, and the names Graham Land and Palmer Land for the northern and southern portions, respectively. The line dividing them is roughly 69 degrees south.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Watson Peaks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Berwick Glacier is a tributary glacier, 14 nautical miles (26 km) long, flowing southeast between the Marshall Mountains and the Adams Mountains to enter Beardmore Glacier at Willey Point in Antarctica. It was named by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, (BrAE) after HMS Berwick, a vessel on which Lieutenant Jameson B. Adams of the BrAE had served. The map of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, and some subsequent maps transpose the positions of Berwick Glacier and Swinford Glacier. The latter lies 12 nautical miles (22 km) southwestward, and the original 1907–09 application of Berwick Glacier is the one recommended.

Billie Peak is a peak, 725 metres (2,380 ft) high, which rises 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) east-northeast of Bay Point on the southeast coast of Anvers Island, in the Palmer Archipelago. It was discovered by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Gerlache. The name appears on a chart based on a 1927 Discovery Investigations survey, but may reflect an earlier naming.

Briesemeister Peak is a peak, 690 metres (2,260 ft) high, which stands 7 nautical miles (13 km) west-northwest of Cape Rymill on the east coast of Palmer Land. This peak was photographed from the air by Sir Hubert Wilkins on December 20, 1928, and by the United States Antarctic Service in 1940. It was named by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, 1947–48, after William A. Briesemeister, Chief Cartographer of the American Geographical Society, 1913–63, who by recognizing this peak on two photographs taken by Wilkins established their continuity, an important clue to the identity and correct position of Stefansson Strait; he supervised the preparation of maps of Antarctica for use during the International Geophysical Year (IGY) (1957–58) and post-IGY programs of the United States Antarctic Research Program, including continental maps published at a scale of 1:6,000,000 (1956) and 1:5,000,000 (1962).

The Carey Range is a mountain range, about 35 nautical miles (65 km) long and 5 nautical miles (10 km) wide with peaks rising to 1,700 metres (5,600 ft), between Mosby Glacier and Fenton Glacier in southeast Palmer Land. The range was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1966–69. In association with the names of continental drift scientists grouped in this area, it was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Samuel W. Carey, Australian geologist; Professor of Geology, University of Tasmania, 1946–1970.

Cole Peak is a peak, 2,140 metres (7,020 ft) high, located 6 nautical miles (11 km) northeast of Mount Doumani at the north side of the Watson Escarpment. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Jerry D. Cole, airman with U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 at McMurdo Sound, 1957 and 1960.

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Daggoo Peak

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Potter Peak

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