Watson Peninsula

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Watson Peninsula is a narrow peninsula 4 km (2.5 mi) long separating Macdougal and Marr Bays on the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under Bruce, who named it for G.L. Watson, yacht designer and redesigner of the expedition ship Scotia.

Peninsula A piece of land that is bordered by water on three sides but connected to mainland

A peninsula is a landform surrounded by water on the majority of its border while being connected to a mainland from which it extends. The surrounding water is usually understood to be continuous, though not necessarily named as a single body of water. Peninsulas are not always named as such; one can also be a headland, cape, island promontory, bill, point, or spit. A point is generally considered a tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water that is less prominent than a cape. A river which courses through a very tight meander is also sometimes said to form a "peninsula" within the loop of water. In English, the plural versions of peninsula are peninsulas and, less commonly, peninsulae.

Macdougal Bay is a small bay lying between Ferguslie Peninsula and Watson Peninsula on the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands, Antarctica. It was charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who named it for J. Macdougal, third mate of the expedition ship Scotia.

Marr Bay is a bay lying between Cape Valavielle and Fraser Point along the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. It was mapped in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, and was named for James W.S. Marr, a member of the Discovery Committee zoological staff, by personnel on the Discovery II following their survey of the South Orkney Islands in 1933.

Important Bird Area

The peninsula has been identified an Important Bird Area (IBA) by BirdLife International because it supports a large breeding colony of about 13,000 pairs of chinstrap penguins. Other birds nesting at the site include Adélie and gentoo penguins as well as southern giant petrels. [1]

Important Bird Area area recognized as being globally important habitat for the conservation of birds populations

An Important Bird and Biodiversity Area (IBA) is an area identified using an internationally agreed set of criteria as being globally important for the conservation of bird populations.

BirdLife International is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats, and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.

Bird colony large congregation of birds at a particular location

A bird colony is a large congregation of individuals of one or more species of bird that nest or roost in proximity at a particular location. Many kinds of birds are known to congregate in groups of varying size; a congregation of nesting birds is called a breeding colony. Colonial nesting birds include seabirds such as auks and albatrosses; wetland species such as herons; and a few passerines such as weaverbirds, certain blackbirds, and some swallows. A group of birds congregating for rest is called a communal roost. Evidence of colonial nesting has been found in non-neornithine birds (Enantiornithes), in sediments from the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Romania.

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Buchanan Point is a headland 5 km (3.1 mi) north-west of Cape Dundas and 2 km (1.2 mi) south-east of Mackintosh Cove, at the north-eastern end of Laurie Island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica.

Cape Whitson

Cape Whitson, is a headland on the south coast of Laurie Island, the easternmost and second largest of the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It lies about 9 km south-east of Argentina’s Orcadas Base.

Cuthbertson Snowfield is a snowfield rising to 340 metres (1,120 ft) and covering the high ground of eastern Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1987 after William Cuthbertson, the artist on the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition, led by W.S. Bruce, which wintered on Laurie Island in 1903.

Cape Davidson is a cape which marks the southernmost part of Mackenzie Peninsula and the west side of the entrance to Wilton Bay, in the west part of Laurie Island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who named it for J. Davidson, first mate of the expedition ship Scotia.

The Tupinier Islands are a group of pyramid-shaped islands lying off the north coast of Trinity Peninsula, about 6 km (3.7 mi) west of Cape Ducorps. They were discovered by the French expedition under Captain Jules Dumont d'Urville, 1837–40, and named after Baron Tupinier (1779–1850), an official of the French Naval Ministry who was instrumental in obtaining government support for the expedition. The islands were recharted by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1946.

Pirie Peninsula is a narrow peninsula extending 6 km (3.7 mi) northward from the center of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. The peninsula was surveyed in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under Bruce, who named it for Dr Harvey Pirie, surgeon and geologist of the expedition.

Eillium Island

Eillium Island is a small island 2.2 km (1.4 mi) north-west of Rumbo Punta, the north-west tip of Laurie Island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was first seen and roughly charted by Captain George Powell and Captain Nathaniel Palmer during their joint cruise in 1821. It was recharted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under Dr. William S. Bruce, who named it for his son Eillium.

Ferguslie Peninsula

Ferguslie Peninsula is a peninsula 2.4 km (1.5 mi) long, lying between Browns Bay and Macdougal Bay on the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. Cape Geddes forms the tip of the peninsula. It was charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who named it for Ferguslie, the residence of James Coats, chief patron of the expedition.

Ferrier Peninsula is a narrow peninsula, 2.4 km (1.5 mi) long, forming the eastern end of Laurie Island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was roughly charted in 1823 by a British sealing expedition under James Weddell. It was surveyed in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who named it for his secretary J.G. Ferrier, who was also manager in Scotland of the expedition.

Fraser Point is a point between Marr Bay and Mackintosh Cove on the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was mapped by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition in 1903, and in 1912–13 by Captain Petter Sorlle. It was remapped in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel on the Discovery II who named it for Francis C. Fraser.

Cape Geddes

Cape Geddes is a cape which forms the northern end of the Ferguslie Peninsula on the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who named it for Professor Patrick Geddes, a noted Scottish biologist and sociologist.

Graptolite Island is an island 0.8 km (0.50 mi) long in the north-east part of Fitchie Bay, lying off the south-east portion of Laurie Island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. James Weddell's chart published in 1825 shows two islands in essentially this position. Existence of a single island was determined in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, who so named it because what were thought to be graptolite fossils were found there. Later analysis showed that the fossils on Graptolite Island were merely the remains of ancient plants.

Point Martin is a point on the east side of Mossman Peninsula, 1.5 km (0.93 mi) north-west of Cape Murdoch, on the south coast of Laurie Island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was charted in 1903 by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under Bruce, who named it for J. Martin, an able seaman on the expedition ship Scotia.

Cape Valavielle is a cape marking the north end of Watson Peninsula on the north coast of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands. Charted and named by the French expedition, 1837–40, under Captain Jules Dumont d'Urville.

Cape Robertson is a cape which marks the west side of the entrance to Jessie Bay, in the north-west part of Laurie Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It lies 2 km (1.2 mi) east of Route Point at the north end of Mackenzie Peninsula. On the map of Laurie Island by the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under Bruce, 1902–04, the name Cape Robertson appears in the position of Route Point, previously named by Captain George Powell and Captain Nathaniel Palmer in 1821. The name Route Point is retained for the north-west end of Mackenzie Peninsula; Cape Robertson is the north-east extremity. It is named for Thomas Robertson, captain of the Scotia, expedition ship of the ScotNAE.

References

  1. "Watson Peninsula, Laurie Island". BirdLife data zone: Important Bird Areas. BirdLife International. 2013. Retrieved 2013-01-22.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Watson Peninsula" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Coordinates: 60°42′S44°32′W / 60.700°S 44.533°W / -60.700; -44.533

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.