Watson Valley

Last updated

Watson Valley ( 77°14′23″S161°34′05″E / 77.23972°S 161.56806°E / -77.23972; 161.56806 Coordinates: 77°14′23″S161°34′05″E / 77.23972°S 161.56806°E / -77.23972; 161.56806 ) is a valley east of Mount Lewis in the Saint Johns Range of Victoria Land. The valley, which opens southward to Victoria Upper Glacier, is ice free except for a small glacier at the head wall. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 2007 after HM2 Donald E. Watson, U.S. Navy (Seabees), who at the time was Medical Assistant and member of the construction crew which built the original Little America V Station and the original Byrd Station in the 1955-57 pre-IGY period. He was the medical person on the oversnow Byrd Traverse to Byrd Station, 1956. [1]

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mount Lewis is a mountain rising to 1,450 metres (4,760 ft) at the southwest end of Rutherford Ridge in the Saint Johns Range. A rock gable on the southwest face of the mountain provides an easily recognized landmark when viewed from southward. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 2007 after Adam R. Lewis, research assistant professor at North Dakota State University who has made significant contributions to understanding the Late Cenozoic vegetation history of the McMurdo Dry Valleys.

Saint Johns Range is a crescent-shaped mountain range about 20 nautical miles (37 km) long, in Victoria Land. It is bounded on the north by the Cotton, Miller and Debenham Glaciers, and on the south by Victoria Valley and the Victoria Upper and Victoria Lower Glaciers. Named by the New Zealand Northern Survey Party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1956–58, which surveyed peaks in the range in 1957. Named for St. Johns College at Cambridge, England, with which several members of the British Antarctic Expedition (1910–13) were associated during the writing of their scientific reports, and in association with the adjacent Gonville and Caius Range.

Related Research Articles

Skelton Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Skelton Glacier is a large glacier flowing from the polar plateau into the Ross Ice Shelf at Skelton Inlet on the Hillary Coast, south of Victoria Land, Antarctica.

Hammond Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hammond Glacier is located on the northeast side of the Haines Mountains, flowing northwest for about 40 nautical miles (70 km) to Sulzberger Ice Shelf in the Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. It was discovered in 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, and named by Richard E. Byrd for John Hays Hammond, an American mining engineer and philanthropist.

The Quartermain Mountains are a group of exposed mountains in Antarctica, about 32 kilometers long, typical of ice-free features of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Victoria Land, located south of Taylor Glacier and bounded by Finger Mountain, Mount Handsley, Mount Feather and Tabular Mountain; also including Knobhead, Terra Cotta Mountain, New Mountain, Beacon Heights, Pyramid Mountain, Arena Valley, Kennar Valley, Turnabout Valley and the several valleys and ridges within Beacon Valley.

Haskell Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Haskell Glacier is a small glacier descending from the Christoffersen Heights and draining west between Prism Ridge and the Forbidden Rocks, in the Jones Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the University of Minnesota Jones Mountains Party, 1960–61, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Hugh B. Haskell, U.S. Navy, co-pilot on a pioneer flight of November 25, 1961 from Byrd Station to establish Sky-High Camp at 75°14′S77°6′W.

Amos Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Amos Glacier is a 3-nautical-mile (6 km) long glacier that flows southeast from Bettle Peak to a juncture with the Blue Glacier, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named in 1992 by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Larry Leon Amos, a civil engineer with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and a member of the USGS two man astronomic surveying team to South Pole Station and Byrd Station in the 1969–70 field season. Among other work, the team established the position of the Geographic South Pole and established a tie to the Byrd Ice Strain net which had been under study for several years.

Arthur Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Arthur Glacier is a valley glacier in Antarctica. It is about 25 nautical miles (50 km) long, and flows west to Sulzberger Ice Shelf between the Swanson Mountains on the north and Mount Rea and Mount Cooper on the south, in the Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land. It was discovered by members of West Base of the United States Antarctic Service, in aerial flights and from ground surveys in November–December 1940. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Rear Admiral Arthur C. Davis, a leader in aviation in the U.S. Navy.

Kukri Hills

Kukri Hills is a prominent east-west trending range, about 25 nautical miles (46 km) long and over 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) high, forming the divide between Ferrar Glacier on the south and Taylor Glacier and Taylor Valley on the north, in Victoria Land, Antarctica.

Knobhead is a massive ice-free mountain, 2,400 metres (7,900 ft) high, standing south of the western end of the Kukri Hills and overlooking Ferrar Glacier and Taylor Glacier at their point of apposition, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04) and so named because of its appearance.

Plane Table is a distinctive ice free mesa in the north part of the Asgard Range, Victoria Land. This flattish feature surmounts the area between Nibelungen Valley and the Sykes Glacier and commands an extensive view of Wright Valley. A descriptive name given by New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee (NZ-APC).

Fenrir Valley is a small, mainly ice-free valley between the upper reaches of Heimdall Glacier and Rhone Glacier in the Asgard Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The name, applied by the New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee and the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in consultation, is one in a group in the range derived from Norse mythology, wherein Fenrir is a wolf chained by Tīw.

Frazier Glacier is a glacier between the Clare Range and Detour Nunatak, flowing northeast to join Mackay Glacier east of Pegtop Nunatak, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1964 for Lieutenant W.F. Frazier, officer in charge at Byrd Station, 1963.

Mime Glacier is a small glacier at the south (upper) end of Tiw Valley in the Asgard Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The name is one in a group given by the New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee from Norse mythology. In Der Ring des Nibelungen, Mime is the smith who aids Siegfried to win the ring and is slain by the hero for his treachery.

Heimdall Glacier is a small glacier just east of Siegfried Peak and Siegmund Peak on the south side of Wright Valley in the Asgard Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The name, given by the New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee, is one in a group derived from Norse mythology, Heimdall being the warden of Asgard.

Mount Hercules is a large, flat-topped, elevated feature between Mount Aeolus and Mount Jason in the Olympus Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (1958–59) for Hercules, a figure in Greek mythology.

Victoria Upper Glacier is a glacier occupying the upper northwest end of Victoria Valley in Antarctica. It was named by the Victoria University of the Wellington Antarctic Expedition (1958–59) for their Alma Mater which sponsored the expedition.

Anu Whakatoro Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Anu Whakatoro Glacier is an Antarctic glacier 0.7 nautical miles (1.3 km) long, between Tūkeri Peak and Spain Peak on the headwall of Ringer Valley in the Saint Johns Range, Victoria Land. “Anu Whakatoro” is a Māori word, meaning force of wind, and was applied descriptively to this glacier by the New Zealand Geographic Board in 2005.

Turnbull Peak is a peak rising to 1,600 metres (5,200 ft) at the head of Hernandez Valley in the Apocalypse Peaks of Victoria Land. Named by the New Zealand Geographic Board (NZGB) (2005) after Ian Turnbull, an Institute of Geology and Nuclear Sciences geologist, who was a member of geology mapping parties at Asgard Range, Victoria Valley, Saint Johns Range, and at the Mackay Glacier and Wilson Piedmont Glacier areas in several field seasons 1988-89 to 1997-98.

The Cruzen Range is a mountain range that rises to 1600 m in Vashka Crag and extends west to east for 10 nautical miles (19 km) between Salyer Ledge and Nickell Peak in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Victoria Land. The range is bounded to north, east, south and west by the Clare Range, Victoria Valley, Barwick Valley, and the Webb Glacier. Named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 2005 after Rear Admiral Richard H. Cruzen, commander of Task Force 68 during the U.S. Navy Antarctic Developments Project, 1946-47.

Broady Valley is a steeply inclined valley, 1.5 nautical miles long, lying west of Lanyon Peak in the Saint Johns Range of Victoria Land. The valley opens southwest to the snout of the Victoria Upper Glacier. Named by the New Zealand Geographic Board in 2005 after Paul Broady, University of Melbourne, a microbial biologist who worked with the New Zealand Antarctic Research Programme for eight seasons from 1981, at McMurdo Dry Valleys, Ross Island, Marie Byrd Land and other areas; with the British Antarctic Survey at Signy Island in the 1970s, and with the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions in the early 1980s.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Watson Valley" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.