Watsonieae

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Watsonieae
Watsonia tabularis 2.jpg
Watsonia tabularis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Iridaceae
Subfamily: Ixioideae
Tribe:Watsonieae
Genera

See text.

Watsonieae is the second largest tribe in the Ixioideae subfamily (which is included in the Iridaceae family) and named after the best-known genus in it — Watsonia . The members in this group are widely distributed in Africa, mainly in its southern parts.

Iridaceae family of plants

Iridaceae is a family of plants in order Asparagales, taking its name from the irises, meaning rainbow, referring to its many colours. There are 66 accepted genera with a total of c. 2244 species worldwide. It includes a number of other well known cultivated plants, such as freesias, gladioli and crocuses.

<i>Watsonia</i> (plant) genus of plants

Watsonia is a genus of plants in the iris family, subfamily Crocoideae. Watsonias are native to southern Africa. The genus is named after Sir William Watson, an 18th-century British botanist.

Africa The second largest and second most-populous continent, mostly in the Northern and Eastern Hemispheres

Africa is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent, being behind Asia in both categories. At about 30.3 million km2 including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth's total surface area and 20% of its land area. With 1.2 billion people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Isthmus of Suez and the Red Sea to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. The continent includes Madagascar and various archipelagos. It contains 54 fully recognised sovereign states (countries), nine territories and two de facto independent states with limited or no recognition. The majority of the continent and its countries are in the Northern Hemisphere, with a substantial portion and number of countries in the Southern Hemisphere.

They sometimes have the typical sword-shaped leaves of the Iridaceae family, but sometimes, like in Lapeirousia pyramidalis or Lapeirousia divaricata , they are very specific. The rootstock is a corm.

Corm

A corm, bulbo-tuber, or bulbotuber is a short, vertical, swollen underground plant stem that serves as a storage organ that some plants use to survive winter or other adverse conditions such as summer drought and heat (perennation).

The blooms are collected in inflorescence and sometimes have scent. They have six tepals which are identical in the most cases but sometimes has small differences. The ovary is 3-locular.

Most of these plants are not among the popular ornamental flowers. Watsonia is often used with this purpose, but the other genera are not very well known. However, they have many ornamental traits.

Plant multicellular eukaryote of the kingdom Plantae

Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes. By one definition, plants form the clade Viridiplantae, a group that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns and their allies, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, but excludes the red and brown algae.

List of genera

Cyanixia is a genus of plants in the Iridaceae, first described in 2003. It contains only one known species, Cyanixia socotrana, a perennial, herbaceous and bulbous plant species endemic to the Island of Socotra in the Indian Ocean, part of the Republic of Yemen.

<i>Lapeirousia</i> genus of plants

Lapeirousia is a genus in the plant family Iridaceae. It is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, about a third of the species occurring in fynbos.

<i>Micranthus</i> genus of plants

Micranthus is a genus of flowering plants in the family Iridaceae. The entire genus is endemic to Cape Province in South Africa.

Related Research Articles

<i>Freesia</i> genus of plants

{{taxobox |name =Freesia |image =Freesia.jpg |image_caption =Cultivated freesias |regnum =Plantae |unranked_divisio =Angiosperms |unranked_classis =Monocots |ordo =Asparagales |familia =Iridaceae |subfamilia =Ixioideae |genus =Freesia |genus_authority =Eckl. ex Klatt |type_species =Freesia refracta |type_species_authority =(Jacquin) Klatt |synonyms_ref= |synonyms=*AnomathecaKer Gawl.

<i>Gladiolus</i> genus of plants

Gladiolus is a genus of perennial cormous flowering plants in the iris family (Iridaceae).

Stigma (botany) part of a flower

The stigma is the receptive tip of a carpel, or of several fused carpels, in the gynoecium of a flower.

<i>Freesia laxa</i> species of plant

Freesia laxa, flowering grass, is a small species of cormous flowering plant in the family Iridaceae, from eastern and southern Africa, from Kenya to northeastern South Africa. It is grown in gardens as an ornamental plant.

<i>Hesperantha coccinea</i> species of plant

Hesperantha coccinea is a flowering plant in the family Iridaceae, native to Southern Africa and Zimbabwe.

Iridoideae subfamily of plants

Iridoideae is one of the two main subfamilies in the popular Iridaceae family. It contains the best-known genus - Iris. The members of this subfamily are widely distributed worldwide. They grow in all continents except Antarctica.

Crocoideae subfamily of plants

Crocoideae is one of the major subfamilies in the Iridaceae family.

Irideae tribe of plants

Irideae is a tribe included in the well-known Iridaceae family. It contains many species in five genera which are widely distributed in the Old World. The tribe derives its name from Iris, which is the largest genus of the tribe.

<i>Romulea bulbocodium</i> species of plant

Romulea bulbocodium is one of the best-known species from the genus Romulea. The plant, a member of the Iridaceae family, is native to the Mediterranean region and Sudan. It has many varieties and is occasionally used as ornamental plant.

Mariceae tribe of plants

Mariceae is a tribe included in the Iridaceae family, Iridoideae subfamily. It's the smallest tribe in this subfamily because It contains only three closely related genera.

Sisyrinchieae tribe of plants

Sisyrinchieae is the second largest tribe in the Iridoideae subfamily. The group is included in the Iridaceae family. It contains many perennials which are widely distributed in the New World.

<i>Crocus flavus</i> species of plant

Crocus flavus, known as yellow crocus or Dutch yellow crocus, is a species of flowering plant of the Crocus genus in the Iridaceae family. It grows wild on the slopes of Greece, former Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Romania and northwestern Turkey, with fragrant bright orange-yellow flowers which Tennyson likened to a fire. It is a small crocus (5–6 cm, despite the names of some cultivars, compared to the Giant Dutch crocuses. Its cultivars are used as ornamental plants.

<i>Watsonia marginata</i> species of plant

Watsonia marginata is a species of flowering plant in the iris family known by the common name fragrant bugle-lily. It is native to the Cape Provinces of South Africa, but it is well known as an ornamental plant grown in gardens for its showy spikes of flowers. Its native range is an area with winter rainfall and dry summers. It is a perennial herb growing from a corm and growing to a maximum height well over one metre when in flower, sometimes reaching two metres. Each corm produces three or four erect leaves that measure up to 80 cm long by 5 wide. They are blue-green with thickened yellow margins. The inflorescence is a dense spike of 30 to 50 flowers which may be any shade of pink or sometimes dark red or white. The flower is actinomorphic, or radially symmetrical, unlike those of other Watsonia, which are zygomorphic. The flowers are several cm long.

<i>Watsonia meriana</i> species of plant

Watsonia meriana is a species of flowering plant in the iris family (Iridaceae) known by the common name bulbil bugle-lily. It is one of several Watsonia species known as wild watsonia. It is native to the Cape Provinces of South Africa, but it is well known as an ornamental plant grown in gardens for its showy spikes of flowers and an invasive species in areas where it has escaped cultivation. It is a perennial herb growing from a fibrous-coated corm and growing to a maximum height well over one meter when in flower, sometimes reaching two meters. Each corm produces three or four erect, lance-shaped leaves that measure up to 60 centimeters long by 6 wide. They have thickened midribs and margins. The inflorescence is an open spike of 8 to 25 flowers which may be any most any shade of orange to reddish or purplish. The flower is up to 8 centimeters long with a long, tubular throat and spreading tepals. The flowers sometimes yield capsule fruits which contain seed, but the plant often reproduces via bulbils that form in clusters in the axils of bracts at nodes along the peduncle. The bulbils can sprout if dropped into the soil, sometimes forming dense colonies, as can sections of corm that are chopped and dispersed by plowing or by non-intensive feeding by root-eating animals. The plant is accordingly ecologically valuable as feed to local mole-rats and to Cape porcupines

<i>Watsonia borbonica</i> species of plant

Watsonia borbonica, the Cape bugle-lily, is a species of plant in the family Iridaceae that is native to South Africa.

Peter Goldblatt is a South African botanist, working principally in the United States.

References