Watt–Groce–Fickhardt House

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Watt–Groce–Fickhardt House

Watt-Groce-Fickhardt House front.jpg

Front of the house
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Location 360 E. Main St., Circleville, Ohio
Coordinates 39°36′0″N82°56′20″W / 39.60000°N 82.93889°W / 39.60000; -82.93889 Coordinates: 39°36′0″N82°56′20″W / 39.60000°N 82.93889°W / 39.60000; -82.93889
Area 0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Built 1826
Architectural style I-house
NRHP reference # 85001804 [1]
Added to NRHP August 23, 1985

The Watt–Groce–Fickhardt House is a historic house in Circleville, Ohio, United States. Located along Main Street on the city's eastern side, [1] it is a distinctive landmark and has been named a historic site.

Circleville, Ohio City in Ohio, United States

Circleville is a city in and the county seat of Pickaway County, Ohio, United States, along the Scioto River 25 miles south of Columbus. The population was 13,314 at the 2010 census. The city is best-known today as the host of the Circleville Pumpkin Show, an annual festival held since 1903.

Ohio State of the United States of America

Ohio is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Of the fifty states, it is the 34th largest by area, the seventh most populous, and the tenth most densely populated. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Circleville was platted in 1810 on a farm owned by Jacob Ziegler and Samuel Watt; later in the year, Ziegler sold his interest in the farm to Watt. With the community's rapid expansion, Watt sold more land; by 1820, only 148 acres (60 ha) remained in his ownership. Using the money from the land sales, Watt built a new farmhouse in 1826; [2] two stories high, it is a brick structure with a stone foundation and a metal roof. [3] When completed, it was a typical hall and parlor house. [2]

Plat scale map showing the divisions of a piece of land

In the United States, a plat is a map, drawn to scale, showing the divisions of a piece of land. United States General Land Office surveyors drafted township plats of Public Lands Surveys to show the distance and bearing between section corners, sometimes including topographic or vegetation information. City, town or village plats show subdivisions into blocks with streets and alleys. Further refinement often splits blocks into individual lots, usually for the purpose of selling the described lots; this has become known as subdivision.

Storey level part of a building that could be used by people

A storey or story is any level part of a building with a floor that could be used by people. The plurals are "storeys" and "stories", respectively.

Foundation (engineering) lowest and supporting layer of a structure

In engineering, a foundation is the element of a structure which connects it to the ground, and transfers loads from the structure to the ground. Foundations are generally considered either shallow or deep. Foundation engineering is the application of soil mechanics and rock mechanics in the design of foundation elements of structures.

Front and side of the house Watt-Groce-Fickhardt House angle.jpg
Front and side of the house

As Circleville continued to grow, Watt sold most of his remaining land in 1835; only 5 acres (2.0 ha) remained after the end of that year. Becoming a leading local businessman, he made an extensive addition to the house in 1852; this new structure took the form of an I-house. A smaller addition, built in 1885, is a frame structure attached to the original portion of the house. [2]

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

Framing (construction) in construction, is the fitting together of pieces to give a structure support and shape

Framing, in construction, is the fitting together of pieces to give a structure support and shape. Framing materials are usually wood, engineered wood, or structural steel. The alternative to framed construction is generally called mass wall construction, where horizontal layers of stacked materials such as log building, masonry, rammed earth, adobe, etc. are used without framing.

Today, the Watt–Groce–Fickhardt House remains a well-preserved example of antebellum architecture. [2] In 1985, the house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, [1] qualifying because of its historic architecture and because of its connection to a later resident, John G. Groce, who was a leading member of local society. [3]

History of the United States (1789–1849) aspect of history

George Washington, elected the first president in 1789, set up a cabinet form of government, with departments of State, Treasury, and War, along with an Attorney General. Based in New York, the new government acted quickly to rebuild the nation's financial structure. Enacting the program of Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton, the government assumed the Revolutionary war debts of the states and the national government, and refinanced them with new federal bonds. It paid for the program through new tariffs and taxes; the tax on whiskey led to a revolt in the west; Washington raised an army and suppressed it. The nation adopted a Bill of Rights as 10 amendments to the new constitution. The Judiciary Act of 1789 established the entire federal judiciary, including the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court became important under the leadership of Chief Justice John Marshall (1801–1835), a federalist and nationalist who built a strong Supreme Court and strengthened the national government.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Owen, Lorrie K., ed. Dictionary of Ohio Historic Places. Vol. 2. St. Clair Shores: Somerset, 1999, 1152.
  3. 1 2 Watt–Groce–Fickhardt House, Ohio Historical Society, 2007. Accessed 2010-09-16.