Watt Ridge

Last updated

Watt Ridge ( 84°45′S173°47′W / 84.750°S 173.783°W / -84.750; -173.783 Coordinates: 84°45′S173°47′W / 84.750°S 173.783°W / -84.750; -173.783 ) is a ridge, 7 nautical miles (13 km) long, extending northwest from Mount Llano in the Prince Olav Mountains and terminating at the east side of Barrett Glacier. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Commander Robert C. Watt, U.S. Navy, Supply Officer during U.S. Navy Operation Deepfreeze 1964.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mount Llano is a mountain peak, 1,930 metres (6,330 ft) high, in the foothills of the Prince Olav Mountains of Antarctica, standing 6 nautical miles (11 km) northeast of Mount Wade. It was surveyed by the U.S. Ross Ice Shelf Traverse Party (1957–58) under A.P. Crary, and named after American biologist George A. Llano, an authority on polar lichens. Llano was Program Manager for Biological and Medical Sciences at the Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation, 1960–77, and a member of several seasonal expeditions to Antarctica from 1957–58 onwards.

The Prince Olav Mountains is a mountain range of the Queen Maud Mountains stretching from Shackleton Glacier to Liv Glacier at the head of the Ross Ice Shelf.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Watt Ridge" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


Related Research Articles

Ohio Range

The Ohio Range is a mountain range in the Transantarctic Mountains of Antarctica. It is about 48 km (30 mi) long and 16 km (10 mi) wide, extending WSW-ENE from Eldridge Peak to Mirsky Ledge. The range forms the northeast end of the Horlick Mountains and consists primarily of a large snow-topped plateau with steep northern cliffs and several flat-topped ridges and mountains. The highest point is the summit of Mount Schopf.

The Grove Mountains are a large, scattered group of mountains and nunataks extending over an area of approximately 40 by 20 miles, located 100 miles (160 km) east of the Mawson Escarpment in American Highland, Antarctica. They were first photographed from the air by aircraft of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for Squadron Leader I.L. Grove, a Royal Australian Air Force pilot with the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions, who made a November 1958 landing in these mountains.

Convoy Range is a broad mountain range in Antarctica. Much of the range has a nearly flat plateau-like summit, extending south from the Fry Saddle and ending at Mackay Glacier. The range has steep cliffs on its east side, but it slopes gently into the Cambridge Glacier on the western side.

Shoemaker Glacier is a tributary glacier in the Southern Cross Mountains of Antarctica, flowing east along the south side of Daley Hills to Aviator Glacier, in Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Lieutenant Brian H. Shoemaker, U.S. Navy, helicopter pilot with Squadron VX-6 at McMurdo Station, 1967.

Mount Inderbitzen

Mount Inderbitzen is a mountain rising to over 2,600 metres (8,500 ft), located 12 nautical miles (22 km) south-southeast of Mount Craddock and 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) south of Mount Milton in Owen Ridge, the southernmost part of the Sentinel Range of the Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica. It surmounts Wessbecher Glacier to the southeast and Sirma Glacier to the northwest.

The Lawson Nunataks are a line of nunataks about 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, located 4 nautical miles southwest of Keim Peak in the Usarp Mountains of Antarctica. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–62, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Gerald J. Lawson, a United States Antarctic Research Program biologist at McMurdo Station, 1967–68.

Williamson Ridge is a low snow-covered ridge, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long and 2 to 5 nautical miles (9 km) wide, that forms a western extension of Toney Mountain in Marie Byrd Land. It was mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959–71. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Paul R. Williamson, ionospheric physicist at Byrd Station in two austral summers, 1967–68 and 1969–70.

Anderson Ridge is a ridge 2 nautical miles (4 km) long, rising above the middle of the head of Koerwitz Glacier in the Queen Maud Mountains. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Arthur J. Anderson, a meteorologist with the South Pole Station winter party, 1960.

Anthony Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Anthony Glacier is a glacier which flows in an east-southeast direction to the east coast of Palmer Land where it terminates opposite the south tip of Hearst Island. The upper part of this glacier was seen by a sledge party of the British Graham Land Expedition under John Riddoch Rymill in 1936–37. The glacier was seen from the seaward side in 1940 by a sledging party from the East Base of the United States Antarctic Service, and in 1947 was photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE). It was named by Finn Ronne for Alexander Anthony of the J.P. Stevens Company, New York City, which contributed windproof clothing to the RARE.

Canterbury Spur is a flat-topped ridge leading north from the north face of Mount Glossopteris, 1.3 nautical miles (2.4 km) east of Discovery Ridge, Ohio Range. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1958–59. The spur is named after the Canterbury Museum, Christchurch, New Zealand, home of the National Antarctic Exhibition, Research and Reference Centre. Geologists Jane Newman and Margaret Bradshaw of the Canterbury Museum worked on this ridge during the 1984–85 field season.

Otago Spur is a small spur projecting northward from the Buckeye Table, west of Discovery Ridge, Ohio Range. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1958-59. The spur was studied by a New Zealand Antarctic Research Program (NZARP) geological party, 1983–84, and named after Otago University, the alma mater of Jonathan Aitchison, a member of the field party.

Mount Osborne

Mount Osborne is a mountain standing 5 nautical miles (9 km) east of Mount Craddock, at the end of a side ridge running from the latter and featuring Sanchez Peak and Stolnik Peak, in the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. It surmounts Thomas Glacier to the northeast and Saltzman Glacier to the south.

Newcomer Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Newcomer Glacier is a glacier 20 nautical miles long transecting the north part of the Sentinel Range, flowing from the vicinity of Allen Peak southeast between Gromshin Heights and the main ridge of range, and then east between Gromshin Heights and Sostra Heights to where it leaves the Sentinel Range north of Bracken Peak and south of Foros Spur. Named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Commander Loyd E. Newcomer of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6, pilot on photographic flights over the range on December 14–15, 1959.

Sullivan Ridge is a massive ridge, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, displaying a steep, irregular east slope overlooking Ramsey Glacier and a low gradient, ice-covered west slope overlooking Muck Glacier. The ridge extends generally north from Husky Heights and terminates at the confluence of Muck and Ramsey Glaciers. Discovered and photographed by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–47) and named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Walter S. Sullivan of the New York Times staff, who has written extensively on Antarctic research and exploration.

Mount Pollock is a symmetrical mountain (2,640 m) that rises above the mid-portion of Recoil Glacier just south of Archambault Ridge, in the Deep Freeze Range, Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and US. Navy air photos, 1960–64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Herbert W. Pollock, U.S. Navy, construction electrician at McMurdo Station, 1962 and 1967.

Lishness Peak

Lishness Peak is a peak, 2,200 metres (7,200 ft) high, in Owen Ridge near the south end of the Sentinel Range of the Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica, rising at the east side of Nimitz Glacier, 1 nautical mile (2 km) southeast of Wilson Peak and 8.8 nautical miles (16 km) northwest of Bowers Corner. It was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos from 1957–59, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Alton R. Lishness, a radio operator on a U.S. Navy R4D exploratory flight to this area on January 28, 1958.

Held Glacier is a tributary glacier, 3 nautical miles (6 km), flowing east from the Anderson Heights to enter Shackleton Glacier just south of Epidote Peak, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant George B. Held of the U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps, a Public Works Officer at McMurdo Station during 1964.

Hudson Ridge is a narrow rock ridge 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, lying 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of Heiser Ridge in the Neptune Range of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Peter M. Hudson, an aviation machinist at Ellsworth Station, winter 1958.

Hochstein Ridge is a ridge 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, extending north from Cotton Plateau between Prince Edward Glacier and Prince of Wales Glacier in the Queen Elizabeth Range of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from tellurometer surveys and Navy air photos, 1960–62, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Manfred Hochstein, a United States Antarctic Research Program glaciologist at Roosevelt Island, 1961–62, 1962–63 and 1963–64.

Mount Lanning

Mount Lanning is a mountain, 1,820 metres (5,970 ft) high, located at the south side of Newcomer Glacier, 5 nautical miles (9 km) southeast of Mount Warren, in the northern portion of the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. It forms the north extremity of Sostra Heights, and surmounts Sabazios Glacier to the southwest and Anchialus Glacier to the southeast.